Input on Buying a new Single Stage Press

greencobra

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running a rcbs rock chucker i bought in the early 70's. still going strong, still on the bench, and still use it frequently in conjunction with my progressive. i load small batches...or sometimes when i need mental therapy, i put on music and load giant lots and get lost in the moment for hours. rcbs still has a fantastic warranty and my 50 year old press still gets vip attention from them.
 
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Morning - I want to purchase a new single stage press for loading handgun and some rifle (223 - 6mm Creedmoor - 6.5mm Creedmoor) just wondering if anyone has had great or not so good experience with any of the major brands - TY in advance for your thoughts and experiences - Bob

If I had to buy another single, it'd be a co-ax forster or an r.c.b.s.
If I needed it just to de-cap brass, it'd be the cheapest hunk of garbage I could find

What is so junk about it?

The shafts start to walk after a year or so.
Decent for de-priming and resizing straight walled brass, but with anything that has a shoulder to it, you'll never get it to land in the same spot. It'll kind of flop in until it gets past the halfway point in the die, then the die centers it.
Any of em made within the last 10 years don't last as long as the ones made 20 years ago.
They might spec aluminum for one piece, but go with a lesser grade aluminum thats not really up to the task to begin with.
 
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Been reloading for 50 years the only single stage presses I've had RCBS Rockchucker and a Redding Big Boss. Use the Redding it for case forming and resizing rifle case that my 650s can't do.
 

widnerkj

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Dang you just started a thread akin to 9mm vs 45, or Ford vs Dodge. That said,
Everyone has the single stage they prefer for their own reasons. I've used a majority of the major brands over the years. I do have my own preferences. And I tend to lean to team green. Currently on my bench I have a RCBS summit. And it's a fantastic, compact press. I've loaded more 6.5, 308, 223, 300blk, 9mm, and 10mm with it than I'd care to admit. I do kind of like the rock chucker a little better. But that's just what I'm the most used to. I did recently take down my Dillon XL750, because with the case feeder and everything, it was way too big for the little room I have setup to load and work in at the moment. I've looked hard at that zero reloading press. And I'll likely end up buying one when we move to a larger house.
I did load a ton of 7mm magnum with a lee hand press while I was stationed in texas. (only real option I had in that apartment) If you were only doing bolt action rifle, I'd suggest something like a Sinclair arbor press, and LE wilson dies. But with you doing some handgun, and some rifle. I'd go with a simple setup like a rock chucker, lee classic, or the type. I never tried the turret single stages. But it'd be convenient to have all the dies setup in the turret, and go. Rock chucker gets the nod if you start looking into swaging you own projectiles. (Think 55 grain .224 bullets from spent 22 casings and wheel weight lead.)
 

1903Collector

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Ok, so dies missing pieces or being broken does not equal sh*t press. Half my dies are Lee, about 2 or 3 dies are Hornady, 2 Dillon and the rest are Redding. I never had an issue with any die.

The auto disk, I can't speak to that, I only have the auto drum. But anyway, does not necessarily mean the press is sh*t.

So, your problem is with the company, not necessarily their press.
The company and what they make yes, they may have some stuff that is ok, occasionally they hit the mark. Like you I have also heard that Hornandy is shit but my experience with their products has been quite different than with Lee over the last 30 something years of reloading. Now I will admit I wrote Lee off a long time ago sans the dies I mentioned which I bought more out of desperation as that's all I could get so maybe their stuff has improved.
 
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I have a Lee classic cast press, I use it to decap brass and that's all its good for IMHO. I have bought so many Lee products over the years that have turned out to be junk.
Toss all that junk lee shit in a box I will pay shipping so you can make room for better stuff. Im a poor man and thats what Lee is for
 

whacko

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Not trying to be a dick but the OP is asking for guidance on a single stage press and is being told to get a 750 with all the bells and whistles.

I still use my original single stage press just as much as I use my 550, if not more. Mine's a Lee Classic Cast, but others work great as well. Get one with the "O" vs the "C" frame.
Yeah I caught that too. I'm sure that post from the guy about his Dillon 750 wasn't really advice for the op.....he just couldn't resist the opportunity to brag about his setup. 😂
 

whacko

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Toss all that junk lee shit in a box I will pay shipping so you can make room for better stuff. Im a poor man and thats what Lee is for
I've made thousands and thousands of 357 and 45 on my classic turret. It's good for that. I would never want to reload rifle cal on it but for churning out pistol cal it's fine.....and didn't break the bank.
 

50wt

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I bought the Hornady LNL Iron press for 223 and 6.5 because it came with just about everything . Its a rock solid press that might cost a bit more than the others, but is well built and for sale 😉 .

I had a lyman tmag 2 years ago that worked ok.

An O frame press would be cheap money and good for a single stage.
 
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I have another foolish question when I was reloading in the past (some time ago) I only loaded pistol and 22-250 but it was therapy for me not a speed issue so what is the difference between loading 223 - 243 - 6mm & 6.5 Creedmoor and the hand gun loads other than the obvious (size - powder charge etc) as someone not sure who stated something to the effect that they would not want to do too much rifle reloading on a SS press keep in mind I am loading only for myself and more concerned about turning out an accurate/quality reload vs volume - Thank's again for your input
 

whacko

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I have another foolish question when I was reloading in the past (some time ago) I only loaded pistol and 22-250 but it was therapy for me not a speed issue so what is the difference between loading 223 - 243 - 6mm & 6.5 Creedmoor and the hand gun loads other than the obvious (size - powder charge etc) as someone not sure who stated something to the effect that they would not want to do too much rifle reloading on a SS press keep in mind I am loading only for myself and more concerned about turning out an accurate/quality reload vs volume - Thank's again for your input
Reloading rifle on a single stage is fine if it's a solid one. I said I would not reload rifle on a Lee brand turret.....reason is those turrets are not built as strong as other brands like Dillon and ribs. Rifle resizing takes alot more pressure on the handle and a Lee turret just won't take that much abuse for too long
 

ddraper

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I started out in the mids 80s with an RCBS Rock Chucker. I still have that press and continue to use it. Rock Chuckers are basically indestructable. Find a decent used one and you won't go wrong.
 

gerrycaruso

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Any particular reason you want a single stage? I use one for certain operations but do all by loading on progressives. I don't want to spend all my time at the loading bench and a single stage is way too slow.
 

murf4321

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I've got the Lee classic cast single stage for resizing rifle brass - works well so far. No experience with Turret presses but others here seem to like them. Once rifle brass is prepped it gets loaded on the Hornady LNL progressive.

Curious, what are the stages you use on the progressive since you resize separately.
 

paul73

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I also resize on a single than on a 550 I run mandrel, prime, drop powder, than seat bullet.
It has to be incredibly tedious to do it all on a single stage.
.223 brass I shoot the most is set in 4 200 shell batches. I take usually 200 or 400 rounds a time to shoot.

First time after an initial depriming it takes some time to prep it, size it, work primer pockets- but now after the tumbling the batch goes into motorized shell feeder, and then runs via FL die, then primes, and gets into a box for storage. A round per sec speed. It is it crazy fast on xl750, I would not even dream to do it on a single stage.
 

Mudflap621

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It has to be incredibly tedious to do it all on a single stage.
.223 brass I shoot the most is set in 4 200 shell batches. I take usually 200 or 400 rounds a time to shoot.

First time after an initial depriming it takes some time to prep it, size it, work primer pockets- but now after the tumbling the batch goes into motorized shell feeder, and then runs via FL die, then primes, and gets into a box for storage. A round per sec speed. It is it crazy fast on xl750, I would not even dream to do it on a single stage.
work primer pocket[banghead]
 

Mudflap621

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90% of brass is picked up, it takes time to uniform it and set into batches of similar brand and size. Uniformed primer pockets is a part of the process, but, it is a do once job.
Just razzing ya. For my 223 use range pickups as well and luckily most is LC which I use for the precision stuff. Have you compared groups with untouched pockets vs uniformed and cleaned?
 

paul73

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Just razzing ya. For my 223 use range pickups as well and luckily most is LC which I use for the precision stuff. Have you compared groups with untouched pockets vs uniformed and cleaned?
Not really, as working pockets is just a part of a prep routine for new brass.
I see 0 difference from fresh prepared brass groups to a twice shot prepped brass, if that matters.
 
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Can't go wrong with an RCBS Rockchucker - 40 years of making my mistakes one-at-a-time, instead of by the thousands ;)

Also, remember the John Ruskin quote that used to be inside the Brownells paper catalogs:

“There is hardly anything in the world that someone cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price alone are that person’s lawful prey. It’s unwise to pay too much, but it’s worse to pay too little. When you pay too much, you lose a little money — that is all. When you pay too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do. The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot — it can’t be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run, and if you do that you will have enough to pay for something better.”
 

Michael J. Spangler

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Snag a Herters 234 Turret. A lightweight at 42 pounds. It can handle 3 die sizes from tru-line jr/310 dies up to the big old 50BMG fellas.

I have one on the bench and love it. I think I’m going to swap it out so all my Lee push through bullet sizing dies are on it.

 
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Snag a Herters 234 Turret. A lightweight at 42 pounds. It can handle 3 die sizes from tru-line jr/310 dies up to the big old 50BMG fellas.

I have one on the bench and love it. I think I’m going to swap it out so all my Lee push through bullet sizing dies are on it.

That looks like the Hollywood Press I learned on.
 
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