Information Technology field

jhagberg88

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Does anyone here work in the IT field? I’m attending Salem State for IT and looking for any resources that you all think would be useful.

Jason
 

chrbla2000

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I work in IT. Asking for resources is kinda vague though, what kind of resources? IT Security? DevOps? Datacenter operations and support? It goes on and on... For what it's worth, I've been an IT 'Generalist' for about 24 years.

-chris
 

DarthRevan

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None of the IT people here are particularly happy in their roles... most of the work is patching security updates and audits of our closed areas. If you like mind numbing repetitive work you’ll be happy. Maybe consider Comp. Engineeing?
 

drgrant

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None of the IT people here are particularly happy in their roles... most of the work is patching security updates and audits of our closed areas. If you like mind numbing repetitive work you’ll be happy. Maybe consider Comp. Engineeing?
Says who? [rofl] Lol every IT department is different, and the scope of work is different.

Then again, I will concede that if the OP knows how to write software, or do some systems engineering shit, DBA stuff (SQL) blah blah, he's going to make way more
money. The only gravy train shit (eg, 150K+ jobs) left in typical IT are some kinds of IT security jobs etc.

The guys that can write software though pretty much write their own paycheck- even in a shitty f***ing garbage down economy, programmers and app SW developers etc, are always in
demand.

-Mike
 

new guy

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Information security seems to be the place to be. One of our practices does incident response work and they're raking it in these days.
 

C. Stockwell

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IT is a very broad area. The "resources" OP probably has in mind are employment/internship ones.
 

Tinkermatic

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I’m currently in school for business with some database management sprinkled in for applicable tech skills. Learning database modeling and SQL has been trying. It’s still like a foreign language to me, though I’m not very far in. If there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that the community is just as opinionated and literal as this one. Hour of code is geared towards kids, but got my feet wet. There’s an interactive SQL site (don’t know it off the top of my head) that’s working well for me, YMMV. IT is quite a broad subject, are you studying it as an all around broad field?
 

Night_solstice

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Lots of different answers, but threads of similarity. At this stage in the game, you will probably want to specialize (hardware, networking, security, OS specialty (database, Exchange, AD, etc). What about this field interests you? Why are you getting into it? (Back at the Hospital, the folks in HR would laugh out loud when they got a resume, that would say that the applicant wanted to get in to the medical field because they felt it would be a rewarding career)

Security is a very popular and can be a well paying field. I say specialize for 2 reasons, it allows you to focus your training to get through the door, and remember, this is what you're going to be doing as a career, make sure it's an aspect of the field you enjoy. This is a field that you will likely need thick skin for, if you do your job right, everyone just assumes that nothing happened (and you're not needed), and if something does go wrong, it's screaming, wailing, and allegations that some how your fault they didn't save, listen to you that the equipment needed to be replaced, or that some how you didn't tell Microsoft and warn them that the software is buggy.

It can be rewarding, I actually really still enjoy it, but I would be lying if I said there wasn't aspects that make me want to just keep driving down the highway past my exit (the 2am phone call that power has been restored and office X needs to be powered back up, or the maintenance window that is always scheduled on a long weekend 'so it doesn't impact anyone)). If you have people skills, help desk can be a great door opener, most people don't want to deal with the end user's complaints, and being able to stay calm, and keep the user calm also, can work for you. If you find programming interesting, then that can propel you into a lot of different avenues (and if you're good, $). Myself, I hate it, makes no sense to me. I can follow the logic profile of it, but the actual coding it's garbage to my eyes, and I knew that was nothing I would ever want to touch.

Whatever specialty you choose, build a home lab. Build something and break it. Figure out what broke and how to fix it. Repeat. When you call someone (to fix a problem or to sit in a high level meeting to plan), and they react to your problem like it's the most common thing in the world, calming reviewing the issue, the options, and present how to implement the solution, it's not because this is the first time they ever saw this before, it's because they have, they've struggled, and solved it, and it got added to the 'I've seen this before" pile.
 

EddieZoom

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Been making a living in tech for 30 years now...don't choose this line of work for the sole purpose of chasing money. Do it because you love this stuff...and if you stick around long enough and take some chances...the money might show up.

It's a demanding, stressful, 24x7 gig...you better love this stuff.

When I first started I remember I used to feel like I was getting away with something because some company was willing to pay me to play with tech stuff all day...
 

Broccoli Iglesias

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Does anyone here work in the IT field? I’m attending Salem State for IT and looking for any resources that you all think would be useful.

Jason
Go into cyber security. There is already a shortage of people and things are getting worse, you will make good $$$.

Try to stay away from networking, unless you love workingate nights and weekends, especially when a big hardware refresh is needed.

Also, networking, although still big, it is slowly shrinking. With next gen firewalls on the cloud, soon all you will be doing will be playing with routers, switches and APs. You wont even get to play with the cool security software they bring (like Meraki) because that is usually for the security guys.

Networking guys are still doing stuff like vulnerability management. But Cloud Sec is so much sexier.

Another advantage of security is being able to eventually switch. When you get tired of defending companies, you can become a client exec at Gartner, you can work at Cisco on the sales side, Palo Alto, IBM, Zscaler ... they all love to hire people with security experience to build relationships with security guys. They all offer professional services, and for those services they need people that know their sh*t.

So, security not only is growing today, but it will open your door to other future jobs (good paying jobs).

And get every Cisco certification, it will be better than a Masters.
 
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If you work in an MSP, esp as a consultant or high-level engineer, you'll either sink or swim, be consumed by hell or thrive on chaos. If you can manage getting a job and working in a good MSP then the sky is the limit as to the amount of money you can make. There are plenty of other sub-fields of IT that are more easy going and accessible, but if you want to learn quick (because you have to), work long days, be on call, and commit to studying for the rest of your days then MSPs are for you.
 

WanMan99

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Definitely pick a specialty. The field is too broad for you to be a jack-of-all-trades. I started that way as a system admin and as our data center got larger I picked Storage and VMware as my specialty. Went from technical slave over to Pre-Sales Solutions Architecture and I now have trouble spending all of the money....
 

chrbla2000

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Go into cyber security. There is already a shortage of people and things are getting worse, you will make good $$$.

Try to stay away from networking, unless you love workingate nights and weekends, especially when a big hardware refresh is needed.

Also, networking, although still big, it is slowly shrinking. With next gen firewalls on the cloud, soon all you will be doing will be playing with routers, switches and APs. You wont even get to play with the cool security software they bring (like Meraki) because that is usually for the security guys.

Networking guys are still doing stuff like vulnerability management. But Cloud Sec is so much sexier.

Another advantage of security is being able to eventually switch. When you get tired of defending companies, you can become a client exec at Gartner, you can work at Cisco on the sales side, Palo Alto, IBM, Zscaler ... they all love to hire people with security experience to build relationships with security guys. They all offer professional services, and for those services they need people that know their sh*t.

So, security not only is growing today, but it will open your door to other future jobs (good paying jobs).

And get every Cisco certification, it will be better than a Masters.
Heh..... you go from "stay away from networking" to "get every Cisco cert" If you get every Cisco cert, your life will be networking....
 

chrbla2000

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Definitely pick a specialty. The field is too broad for you to be a jack-of-all-trades. I started that way as a system admin and as our data center got larger I picked Storage and VMware as my specialty. Went from technical slave over to Pre-Sales Solutions Architecture and I now have trouble spending all of the money....
Dunno man, I like being a generalist, it suits my personality. I support a product development lab, VMWare Integrated Openstack environment, and do network/VoIP/desktop/laptop/end user support. No 2 of my days are the same and I get to work on a large breadth of technology.

-chris
 

drgrant

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Definitely pick a specialty. The field is too broad for you to be a jack-of-all-trades. I started that way as a system admin and as our data center got larger I picked Storage and VMware as my specialty. Went from technical slave over to Pre-Sales Solutions Architecture and I now have trouble spending all of the money....
I wouldn't go that far.... some jobs need 10 hat people but the fun thing is you can be a 10 hat guy and not even cover a quarter of the bases.... so an anchor thing is still important
 

kurtb

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Im in information security - what kind of resources are you talking about?
 

Ecosystem3

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If you're getting your degree in business and you're interested in DB's, look into data analytics. If you know how to analyze and use data, there are many industries you can move into.
 
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Is CISSP a worthwhile venture? A few folks I work with got theirs and left the company after getting sick of their silly hiring practices. I haven't attempted a cert since graduating college over a decade ago. Not sure if this is the right place to start.
 

42!

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A surprising amount of IT here, and I like working in IT, maybe not my current boss, but generally I like it. And we span all levels and have widely varying skill sets

Hmmmm, maybe we need to start NES Consulting Inc.
 

HarryPottar

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I've been in IT related fields for 35 plus years now. Mainly engineering but involved in DevOps, security etc.

DevOps is a good field to get into, puts you between engineers and operations, gets you noticed if you're good, which means promotions.

If you're leaning towards databases, one of my area of specialties, data normalization, data warehousing and data mining etc.
I would recommend looking at NoSQL databases such a Mongo, look at only writing to a database and using elastic search to index and for reads.
If this is your interest, start learning Docker, dockerfile and docker-compose, this allow you to spin up a bunch of containers within their own network with Web Server, MongoDB and Elastic Search.

If engineering is your thing, learn Java, master it and master JVM and garbage collection

I second Artie, my middle son works in healthcare IT, thats only growing and due to security will mostly be kept on-shore

Pick your poisons, I work in a Unix world with very little windows, but my son is all windows in the healthcare world.

Find what you're good at, master it, then move on to the next thing. I take in a lot of interns in our dev office and I have to tell you the self taught ones out shine the fresh B.Sc

Harry
 

DarkNet

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The knowledge requirements are, to me, shallow but broad, so you'll at least have some understanding of diverse disciplines of technology security. It could be a differentiator when looking for a job. Same if you're a consultant, and in some cases the customer may require it. In the group that I work with, we all have it (among other certs). I think any certs may be of benifit when looking for a job (at least it's one thing I consider when interviewing). You do have to have ~five years paid experience and have to be signed off by an existing CISSP.
Is CISSP a worthwhile venture? A few folks I work with got theirs and left the company after getting sick of their silly hiring practices. I haven't attempted a cert since graduating college over a decade ago. Not sure if this is the right place to start.
 
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