HUGE Riots all over the USA/Other places too. Mr. Floyd is forgotten now. Rioting/Looting/Antifa-Anarchy/Soros & Co. MEGATHREAD!!!

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Fauci is trying to make his 15 minutes of fame last a whole lot longer ... but he's just making himself look incompetent (not hard to do IMO). Jim Jordan has more balls than the entire GOP.
Jordan is a piece of shit. I have a hard time believing he wasn't looking the other way when the OSU doctor was feeling up his wrestlers.
 
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Junior314

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xtry51

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10thSFFD

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Special level of stupid to the guy in a mask while indoors.

There’s a guy that refuses to be outwoken by anyone else.
Special level of stupidity to publisher following BU dude. He has reached The Master Level!
Soon after delving into the fundamentals of digital computing and binary code this past spring, Santiago Gomez, a Boston University engineering student, came across two words in his textbook that stopped him cold: master and slave.

In engineering and computer programming parlance, they are used to describe the control relationship between circuits or codes, to emphasize how one component can trigger others, from brake and clutch systems in cars to Bluetooth technology.

But for Gomez, 28, who had recently started the graduate engineering program, it evoked a violent history of human trafficking and America’s enduring struggle with slavery and racism.

“How is this the type of language that exists in science and engineering?” Gomez said. “It’s just a word — but language, it shapes how we see the world and what we create.”


In mid-June, amid the Black Lives Matter protests, the toppling of Confederate statues and the re-evaluation of racial justice by government and businesses, Gomez decided to do something about it — and it worked.

He urged the textbook publishing giant Pearson to banish the master-slave metaphor from its technology and engineering books, and the publisher quickly agreed.

Pearson is removing and replacing the “master and slave” language in more than 600 print and digital titles, said Marcia Horton, vice president of product management at Pearson.

In the next six months, the terms will be replaced by, for example, “leader and follower,” or “first and second,” she said.

“We are motivated to do it, and do it as quickly as we can,” Horton said. “We wish we might have figured it out without a student complaint. This summer has caused a lot of reflection on the part of a lot of people.”

In the past, the process of changing the textbook language would have taken much longer, Horton said. But the death of George Floyd at the hands of police in May and the calls for racial justice have prompted swifter action.

Pearson, the world’s largest education publisher, has committees that routinely review textbooks for bias and lack of diversity, but its priority has been on psychology and sociology titles, which were considered more at risk for outdated and offensive language. Texts in the hard sciences, such as engineering, technology, and math, were considered less problematic, Horton said.

But this case has made the publishing company more eager to reach out to students for input in their textbooks, she said.

Pearson’s move is part of a larger drive in the tech community to acknowledge how racial bias can penetrate algorithms and lines of code, determining everything from who qualifies for home mortgages and which neighborhoods get more frequent online delivery orders. The push to remove the master and slave language in technology is a small part of that broader conversation and it has gained momentum this summer.

Separately, earlier this month Twitter announced that it would no longer use the master and slave language, along with other words such as blacklist and dummy value, in its code and documentation. Microsoft-owned GitHub, a site for developers to share and store code, announced in June that it would abandon the master and slave terminology and use more neutral words.

And Pearson has asked the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, a nonprofit professional group that sets industry standards, to consider changing the language.
 
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Please do this Seattle. I'm excited to see how much faster than Detroit a metropolis can fully destroy itself.
Bill Gates has offered to supply 5,000 autonomous Clippy-bots, Bob-bots, and Tay-bots, each available in 57 color schemes, to respond to citizen calls, if they have a major credit card and pre-register for the stand-by fee of just $69.95 a month (or $998.95 per year). Bots arrive loaded with Microsoft Office, Febreze, and celery sticks, and are programmed to resolve 42 different social incidents.
 

timbo

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Special level of stupidity to publisher following BU dude. He has reached The Master Level!
Soon after delving into the fundamentals of digital computing and binary code this past spring, Santiago Gomez, a Boston University engineering student, came across two words in his textbook that stopped him cold: master and slave.

In engineering and computer programming parlance, they are used to describe the control relationship between circuits or codes, to emphasize how one component can trigger others, from brake and clutch systems in cars to Bluetooth technology.

But for Gomez, 28, who had recently started the graduate engineering program, it evoked a violent history of human trafficking and America’s enduring struggle with slavery and racism.

“How is this the type of language that exists in science and engineering?” Gomez said. “It’s just a word — but language, it shapes how we see the world and what we create.”


In mid-June, amid the Black Lives Matter protests, the toppling of Confederate statues and the re-evaluation of racial justice by government and businesses, Gomez decided to do something about it — and it worked.

He urged the textbook publishing giant Pearson to banish the master-slave metaphor from its technology and engineering books, and the publisher quickly agreed.

Pearson is removing and replacing the “master and slave” language in more than 600 print and digital titles, said Marcia Horton, vice president of product management at Pearson.

In the next six months, the terms will be replaced by, for example, “leader and follower,” or “first and second,” she said.

“We are motivated to do it, and do it as quickly as we can,” Horton said. “We wish we might have figured it out without a student complaint. This summer has caused a lot of reflection on the part of a lot of people.”

In the past, the process of changing the textbook language would have taken much longer, Horton said. But the death of George Floyd at the hands of police in May and the calls for racial justice have prompted swifter action.

Pearson, the world’s largest education publisher, has committees that routinely review textbooks for bias and lack of diversity, but its priority has been on psychology and sociology titles, which were considered more at risk for outdated and offensive language. Texts in the hard sciences, such as engineering, technology, and math, were considered less problematic, Horton said.

But this case has made the publishing company more eager to reach out to students for input in their textbooks, she said.

Pearson’s move is part of a larger drive in the tech community to acknowledge how racial bias can penetrate algorithms and lines of code, determining everything from who qualifies for home mortgages and which neighborhoods get more frequent online delivery orders. The push to remove the master and slave language in technology is a small part of that broader conversation and it has gained momentum this summer.

Separately, earlier this month Twitter announced that it would no longer use the master and slave language, along with other words such as blacklist and dummy value, in its code and documentation. Microsoft-owned GitHub, a site for developers to share and store code, announced in June that it would abandon the master and slave terminology and use more neutral words.

And Pearson has asked the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, a nonprofit professional group that sets industry standards, to consider changing the language.
It should be interesting to see what neutered terms they come up with instead of master/slave.
 

xtry51

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Special level of stupidity to publisher following BU dude. He has reached The Master Level!

Soon after delving into the fundamentals of digital computing and binary code this past spring, Santiago Gomez, a Boston University engineering student, came across two words in his textbook that stopped him cold: master and slave.

In engineering and computer programming parlance, they are used to describe the control relationship between circuits or codes, to emphasize how one component can trigger others, from brake and clutch systems in cars to Bluetooth technology.

But for Gomez, 28, who had recently started the graduate engineering program, it evoked a violent history of human trafficking and America’s enduring struggle with slavery and racism.

“How is this the type of language that exists in science and engineering?” Gomez said. “It’s just a word — but language, it shapes how we see the world and what we create.”


In mid-June, amid the Black Lives Matter protests, the toppling of Confederate statues and the re-evaluation of racial justice by government and businesses, Gomez decided to do something about it — and it worked.

He urged the textbook publishing giant Pearson to banish the master-slave metaphor from its technology and engineering books, and the publisher quickly agreed.

Pearson is removing and replacing the “master and slave” language in more than 600 print and digital titles, said Marcia Horton, vice president of product management at Pearson.

In the next six months, the terms will be replaced by, for example, “leader and follower,” or “first and second,” she said.

“We are motivated to do it, and do it as quickly as we can,” Horton said. “We wish we might have figured it out without a student complaint. This summer has caused a lot of reflection on the part of a lot of people.”

In the past, the process of changing the textbook language would have taken much longer, Horton said. But the death of George Floyd at the hands of police in May and the calls for racial justice have prompted swifter action.

Pearson, the world’s largest education publisher, has committees that routinely review textbooks for bias and lack of diversity, but its priority has been on psychology and sociology titles, which were considered more at risk for outdated and offensive language. Texts in the hard sciences, such as engineering, technology, and math, were considered less problematic, Horton said.

But this case has made the publishing company more eager to reach out to students for input in their textbooks, she said.

Pearson’s move is part of a larger drive in the tech community to acknowledge how racial bias can penetrate algorithms and lines of code, determining everything from who qualifies for home mortgages and which neighborhoods get more frequent online delivery orders. The push to remove the master and slave language in technology is a small part of that broader conversation and it has gained momentum this summer.

Separately, earlier this month Twitter announced that it would no longer use the master and slave language, along with other words such as blacklist and dummy value, in its code and documentation. Microsoft-owned GitHub, a site for developers to share and store code, announced in June that it would abandon the master and slave terminology and use more neutral words.

And Pearson has asked the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, a nonprofit professional group that sets industry standards, to consider changing the language.
He should have asked them to ban all references to computers because they all work on binary and that is a clear reflection of there only being 2 genders.
 
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In 1943, in the midst of World War II, then-Vice President Henry Wallace gave a speech on racism in Detroit that would ultimately lead to the Democratic Party kicking him off the ticket the following year.

“We cannot fight Nazism abroad and condone race riots,” Wallace warned a mass meeting of community and labor groups, following a series of riots and protests that police said killed 17 African Americans. “Those who fan the fires of racial clashes for the purpose of making political capital here at home are taking the first step toward Nazism.” He highlighted those trying to undermine President Franklin Roosevelt’s domestic progress. “Some people call these powerful groups ‘isolationists,’ others call them ‘reactionaries,’ and still others call them ‘American Fascists.’”



When Henry Wallace Warned of ‘American Fascism’


Its almost as if they seen it coming...
 

10thSFFD

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He should have asked them to ban all references to computers because they all work on binary and that is a clear reflection of there only being 2 genders.

CHECK OUT THE COMMENTS!
santiago.jpg
The actual letter:
I write to you as a recent student of your book, Digital Design, 6th Edition. This textbook provided valuable instruction regarding logic circuits. However, the use of the “master/slave” metaphor to describe the phenomenon of combining two D Flip Flops is abhorrent. As a Latinx student of computer engineering, I request that you update your terminology to prevent further disruption to the learning experience and to take a concrete step towards dismantling systemic racism within engineering.

Studying a new subject always has a learning curve. I spent countless hours identifying essential prime implicants on a Karnaugh Map and understanding the nuance of a Carry-Look-Ahead Adder Circuit. However, the most difficult element of my Logic Design semester was deconstructing the fact that my engineering textbook invoked slavery as a teaching principle. The “master/slave” flip flop terminology proved detrimental to my learning environment. It reminded me that Black people’s presence in the sciences is not fully respected. This issue can be remedied by updating the term to reflect current understandings of race in America. Github recently pledged to remove the terms master and slave from its platform, and you can take a powerful stance by doing so as well.

Racism forms the foundation of American society. Yet, I was still dumbstruck to learn that it is embedded in the basic principles of modern digital computing. The “master/slave” metaphor is proof that a black scientist did not coin this term. What is more troubling is that multiple generations of influential academics did not take pause to critique this metaphor as an ill-conceived teaching tool. This is an example of how systemic racism functions in America. It seeps into the most mundane elements of daily life and is perpetuated by white Americans when they take these elements for granted. Systemic racism in computer engineering starts with a simple flip flop, but it can culminate into algorithmic bias that has life and death consequences for black and brown people. Updating your text will stop reinforcing America’s problematic racial history. More importantly, your actions will teach future engineers to be conscious of their biases and to build computers that are inclusive of many different lived experiences.

Every facet of American society is in the midst of reckoning with its racial elements. Updating how you teach flip flops will remove learning obstacles for students of color and it will send a signal to the broader engineering community that we matter. The time is now to establish a new engineering vocabulary that reflects not only the advance computers that we want to build but also the equal and just America that we want to create.
---------------

The reaction from The Academia:

Giles, one of the longest-serving Black faculty members at BU, has encountered the terminology for many years. “I’ve been bothered by it all my life,” he said, noting that it also appears in other engineering contexts and even in photography. “I had come to see it as undesirable, but unavoidable.”

But, when Gomez emailed him with the idea to write the letter and asked for his feedback, Giles said he saw the matter in a renewed light.

“The letter reminded me I should have been more outraged by it,” Giles said. “Continuing encounters with an irritation can make you build up a callus. I had built up a callus for this language that I wish I hadn’t built up.”

+

ARI TRACHTENBERG

JULY 19, 2020 AT 9:40 AM
Much as I appreciate students taking the initiative to improve their world, this particular effort strikes me as misguided.
The terminology in question refers to inanimate objects, and has neither historical nor actual connection to human slavery (or racism). Coercing a change in terminology largely serves to entrench politically correct speech in a field that has traditionally eschewed politics.
 
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Brewer

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Well, I guess I need to update my resume to remove reference to my masters degrees.

How about Big Swinging Dick in Business Administration.
BS = bull sh!t
MS = more sh!t
PhD = piled higher and deeper

"I earned More Sh!t in business administration from Northeastern University."
 
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Special level of stupidity to publisher following BU dude. He has reached The Master Level!
Soon after delving into the fundamentals of digital computing and binary code this past spring, Santiago Gomez, a Boston University engineering student, came across two words in his textbook that stopped him cold: master and slave.

In engineering and computer programming parlance, they are used to describe the control relationship between circuits or codes, to emphasize how one component can trigger others, from brake and clutch systems in cars to Bluetooth technology.

But for Gomez, 28, who had recently started the graduate engineering program, it evoked a violent history of human trafficking and America’s enduring struggle with slavery and racism.

“How is this the type of language that exists in science and engineering?” Gomez said. “It’s just a word — but language, it shapes how we see the world and what we create.”


In mid-June, amid the Black Lives Matter protests, the toppling of Confederate statues and the re-evaluation of racial justice by government and businesses, Gomez decided to do something about it — and it worked.

He urged the textbook publishing giant Pearson to banish the master-slave metaphor from its technology and engineering books, and the publisher quickly agreed.

Pearson is removing and replacing the “master and slave” language in more than 600 print and digital titles, said Marcia Horton, vice president of product management at Pearson.

In the next six months, the terms will be replaced by, for example, “leader and follower,” or “first and second,” she said.

“We are motivated to do it, and do it as quickly as we can,” Horton said. “We wish we might have figured it out without a student complaint. This summer has caused a lot of reflection on the part of a lot of people.”

In the past, the process of changing the textbook language would have taken much longer, Horton said. But the death of George Floyd at the hands of police in May and the calls for racial justice have prompted swifter action.

Pearson, the world’s largest education publisher, has committees that routinely review textbooks for bias and lack of diversity, but its priority has been on psychology and sociology titles, which were considered more at risk for outdated and offensive language. Texts in the hard sciences, such as engineering, technology, and math, were considered less problematic, Horton said.

But this case has made the publishing company more eager to reach out to students for input in their textbooks, she said.

Pearson’s move is part of a larger drive in the tech community to acknowledge how racial bias can penetrate algorithms and lines of code, determining everything from who qualifies for home mortgages and which neighborhoods get more frequent online delivery orders. The push to remove the master and slave language in technology is a small part of that broader conversation and it has gained momentum this summer.

Separately, earlier this month Twitter announced that it would no longer use the master and slave language, along with other words such as blacklist and dummy value, in its code and documentation. Microsoft-owned GitHub, a site for developers to share and store code, announced in June that it would abandon the master and slave terminology and use more neutral words.

And Pearson has asked the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, a nonprofit professional group that sets industry standards, to consider changing the language.
The problem I have with this elite level of woke is the simple fact there is SLAVERY going on today, real f'ing SLAVERY. Why aren't these people actually out kitted up going after the slave trade today? Oh, you might get some dirt on your hands?

Oh, it's being done by brown and black people (mostly), so is it still woke to be against slavery today?
 

Reptile

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"You be on yous own."



LAPD officers are seen shooting Marine veteran in the head with a rubber bullet while his hands are in the air during Black Lives Matter protest

  • CJ Montano, 24, was taking part in protest on May 30 in Los Angeles when he was shot with rubber bullets
  • One of the projectiles hit him in the head, causing severe bleeding
  • Body camera video released by LAPD shows Montano had his hands in the air when officers opened fire
  • He reportedly suffered temporary vision, hearing and memory loss
  • Incident is being investigated as 'unintentional head strike'
 

Spanz

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Special level of stupidity to publisher following BU dude. He has reached The Master Level!
Soon after delving into the fundamentals of digital computing and binary code this past spring, Santiago Gomez, a Boston University engineering student, came across two words in his textbook that stopped him cold: master and slave.

In engineering and computer programming parlance, they are used to describe the control relationship between circuits or codes, to emphasize how one component can trigger others, from brake and clutch systems in cars to Bluetooth technology.

But for Gomez, 28, who had recently started the graduate engineering program, it evoked a violent history of human trafficking and America’s enduring struggle with slavery and racism.

“How is this the type of language that exists in science and engineering?” Gomez said. “It’s just a word — but language, it shapes how we see the world and what we create.”


In mid-June, amid the Black Lives Matter protests, the toppling of Confederate statues and the re-evaluation of racial justice by government and businesses, Gomez decided to do something about it — and it worked.

He urged the textbook publishing giant Pearson to banish the master-slave metaphor from its technology and engineering books, and the publisher quickly agreed.

Pearson is removing and replacing the “master and slave” language in more than 600 print and digital titles, said Marcia Horton, vice president of product management at Pearson.

In the next six months, the terms will be replaced by, for example, “leader and follower,” or “first and second,” she said.

“We are motivated to do it, and do it as quickly as we can,” Horton said. “We wish we might have figured it out without a student complaint. This summer has caused a lot of reflection on the part of a lot of people.”

In the past, the process of changing the textbook language would have taken much longer, Horton said. But the death of George Floyd at the hands of police in May and the calls for racial justice have prompted swifter action.

Pearson, the world’s largest education publisher, has committees that routinely review textbooks for bias and lack of diversity, but its priority has been on psychology and sociology titles, which were considered more at risk for outdated and offensive language. Texts in the hard sciences, such as engineering, technology, and math, were considered less problematic, Horton said.

But this case has made the publishing company more eager to reach out to students for input in their textbooks, she said.

Pearson’s move is part of a larger drive in the tech community to acknowledge how racial bias can penetrate algorithms and lines of code, determining everything from who qualifies for home mortgages and which neighborhoods get more frequent online delivery orders. The push to remove the master and slave language in technology is a small part of that broader conversation and it has gained momentum this summer.

Separately, earlier this month Twitter announced that it would no longer use the master and slave language, along with other words such as blacklist and dummy value, in its code and documentation. Microsoft-owned GitHub, a site for developers to share and store code, announced in June that it would abandon the master and slave terminology and use more neutral words.

And Pearson has asked the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, a nonprofit professional group that sets industry standards, to consider changing the language.
he's right, this is SOOOO frickin raciss

1596269794753.png

and just what the hell is up with Q and QNOT? ALL Q's are created equal.

And clearly we need to change the term "Reset" to "Triggered" from now on!

This douche bag is going to go FAR in engineering!!!
 
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