Hope you don't need anything at Stop & Shop

Spanz

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I'm familiar with Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Are there others or do unions use the calendar equivalent of the Metric system or something?
well, you left out the "phantom days" of Equinox day, Leftover day, and so on
 

Broccoli Iglesias

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When I listen to the Union people, you all make it sound like without the union, workers have no rights, no one makes any money, people are worked to death...

But I have always worked in the private sector and it is not like that at all.

From all the people I know at Unions, this is what I take:

1. The Union makes it harder to fire you.
2. The Union forces the company to sometimes pay an unrealistic wage (S&S cashiers for example).
3. Sometimes, the Union creates laziness. There is no need to work for that promotion or pay raise, you just get it with time.
4. Creates an entry barrier to the market, which affects new people.

Why does MB have every cash register with someone working and S&S is going the way of Walmart with 2 cashiers at a time? ... could it be because those 2 cost more than 4 or 5 somewhere else due to unrealistic wages and union flrced BS?
 

Bt74

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While reading this whole Union vs Non Union thread, I keep remembering the sight of a non-union employee working a store fitup in the mall. A Guatemalan illegal alien, standing to the TOP of an 8' ladder, hugging a steel column with his eyes closed, and shooting a Ramset pin into it, about 4" from his ear. The GC was rabidly anti union, and his initial "carpenters" for the project came from an ad on Craigslist. He was crying like a little baby at the end of the first day...30' of track and 9 studs up! $15 an hour gets a hell of a carpenter!
 

GM-GUY

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F Stop&Shop, the Gardner store closed awhile back. My biggest thing was bottle return, their machines were always full and it would take over an hour for someone to come and ‘service’ them. Notice, I didn’t say empty - they would open the machine, shake the bin and leave - then not come back. The longest time I know of was over two hours as I had shopping and other errands in the same plaza - I drive by the returns area and the machine was still blinking.

I was so happy when Price Chopper opened - although lately I think they hired former Stop&Shop employees.
 
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Do full time supervisors make more or less than you.

ETA: Your welcome to do the math “per hour” if you’d like.

ETA 2: Nevermind. I looked it up. You probably make a lot more than management.
It depends. There's different pay rates but generally a full time supervisor makes more in base salary but they lose out big time on overtime. Especially during peak. They end up working working 14 hours a day and weekends on a 40 hour pay rate.
 

Jason Flare

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It depends. There's different pay rates but generally a full time supervisor makes more in base salary but they lose out big time on overtime. Especially during peak. They end up working working 14 hours a day and weekends on a 40 hour pay rate.
I hope you don’t work over 40 hours.

Because if you work over 40 hours some heads in this thread are going to explode.
 
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I hope you don’t work over 40 hours.

Because if you work over 40 hours some heads in this thread are going to explode.
I generally work about 45 to 52. That's the sweet spot. In this thread I think all the heads have been exploded. There's nothing left.
 

W.E.C

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As usual the shortsightedness of this particular Union is clearly on display. The strike ensured that current employees got to keep what's theirs but make no provision for new employees willing to do the job and who deserve a decent living wage and benefits. Moreover, the Union has successfully created a hierarchical and non-inclusive work environment for new employees who are forced to pay the same Union dues as the current employees doing the same work. But hey- you got yours even if it's only temporary! You just bit the hand that fed you.*

* part time and new employees do not get time and a half for weekends till they get 3 years in. A huge win for management.

Some union solidarity there boy.
 
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I’m gonna say you haven’t read every post in this thread.
Oh yeah there was one guy who said your're crazy if you work over 40. Meh to each his own. I like to have the option. With the boom of internet retail in full force we can't hire people fast enough. 1 out of 10 people stay. Most are either lazy or just not fit enough to do the work. So all the old people end up working more and more overtime. Some want it ,some don't and sometimes you're forced to work it.
 
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You really should take a minute and listen to yourself.
I know exactly what I'm saying and it doesn't bother me a bit. That's why I'm saying it. I know it annoys you but that's your problem not mine. I do the same thing to people I talk to when they start blathering on about gun control. If they get obnoxious about it I get obnoxious. I respect your opinion but don't agree with it. At the end of the day I'm not backing down from what I believe and you aren't either. So it is what it is.
 

Bt74

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Fun fact. It's possible to pay a non union carpenter more than $15 an hour.

Being in a union does not bestow experience and skills on a worker. There are good workers in and out of unions. ..
But how many non union contractors DO pay a decent wage? I agree, there are good workers both in and out of unions, but how many are trained in ALL phases of carpentry? I had to serve a 4 year apprenticeship, 4 weeks a year at a training center, work at least 1200 hours in the field per year, and prove proficiency in all phases before gaining Journeyman rating.
An example: the company I currently work for (I retired from carpentry), hired a contractor to install about a dozen steel double doors in existing jambs ($31k!), and one of them required an exterior lock cylinder, just like the door that was removed. Was never installed, so the "carpenter" was called back. He showed up with the old cylinder and handed it to me, so I asked if he had bored the door? "No, I'm not a locksmith" was his answer. I've installed hundreds of steel doors and NEVER seen a locksmith on the jobs....it's part of being a qualified carpenter.
 
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How does that labor quality argument carry over to supermarkets though? It seems like the union is just a parasite attached to the operation, making everything more expensive.
Mostly it doesnt. They are a single company unskilled union. I wont cross their line but as a union they probably provide little for anyone.

My comments were just an explanation since trade unions keep getting lumped in with the problematic ones and they are two different animals.
 

namedpipes

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But how many non union contractors DO pay a decent wage? I agree, there are good workers both in and out of unions, but how many are trained in ALL phases of carpentry? I had to serve a 4 year apprenticeship, 4 weeks a year at a training center, work at least 1200 hours in the field per year, and prove proficiency in all phases before gaining Journeyman rating.
An example: the company I currently work for (I retired from carpentry), hired a contractor to install about a dozen steel double doors in existing jambs ($31k!), and one of them required an exterior lock cylinder, just like the door that was removed. Was never installed, so the "carpenter" was called back. He showed up with the old cylinder and handed it to me, so I asked if he had bored the door? "No, I'm not a locksmith" was his answer. I've installed hundreds of steel doors and NEVER seen a locksmith on the jobs....it's part of being a qualified carpenter.
Look, a good tradesman does not need a nanny to wipe his chin.

A good contractor can attract good tradesmen by treating them/paying them fairly.

Unions no longer as any security or leverage to fair contractors/tradesmen.

Sorry, tradespersons. Must not assume!
 
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There is a higher concentration of skill because we pay as a group for training our apprentices. Generally in non union construction most if not all (Excepting trades like electricians who require school either way) training is done on the job by the other workers. This can be fine if the guy teaching has a good grasp of the job, and is effective at teaching it but that is not always the case. By standardizing the training and over time making sure the best people to teach it are in those positions we give ourselves an advantage, that advantage is necessary to offset our higher labor cost compared to others.

As far as public benefit why does there need to be? I work under a contract, negotiated with the companies that will be hiring us. Those companies have to bid competitively for jobs accounting for our cost. I have been clear in the past that some types of union are toxic (Generally single company unions and public unions) and some union members are kool aid drinking types (The other guy in this thread). But I don't see anyone arguing that their non union jobs need to have some sort of public benefit either.

You make money for your company to get raises and stay employed, I make money for the company I work for to stay employed and accept a fixed contract wage and benefits. Said contract includes zero sick days, zero vacation days, and no personal time off. I work, or I starve, any time off for any reason is my own problem. That contract is freely entered into by the companies and the union, and we even have a no strike clause in each contract. As far as labor shortage I don't feel we are responsible for that, we are not keeping others from learning the trade. If they don't have the ability to train their people to do my job how is that my fault?

It wasn't you who argued that unions were good for the public, it was someone else. I will argue that union's promise of higher wages is a net negative to the consumer and a direct cause of inflation. I'm glad we're on the same page here, that unions only benefit themselves, and in many cases, unions only benefit the leadership. You are keeping others from learning the trade by trying to keep a monopoly on your vertical. Ever been non union and tried to work anywhere near a union vertical? Those people will act like you're taking bread out of their baby's mouth if they perceive you as violating their golden anus of control.

I guess from the inside you can't really see what a scam it is, but to anyone on the outside can easily see the long history of corruption and damage it's done to our country.
 
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Chicago Boss John Coli Hit with Superseding Indictment - National Legal & Policy Center

John Coli is feeling a heavier load than usual these days. On September 21, Coli (in photo), until recently the most powerful Teamster in the Chicago area, was slapped with a 13-count superseding federal indictment for obstruction of commerce; concealment of facts on reporting forms; and income tax fraud. He previously had been charged in July on six counts of extortion related to his exacting payments from a Chicago TV production company. Prosecutors now estimate his take at $325,000, up from the original sum of $100,000. Coli, who resigned on the day of the original indictment, chose not to plead guilty. He might change his mind given that the IRS and the Labor Department are seeking full forfeiture of related assets. For a once-dominant figure in labor and politics, the fall has been swift.
Feds, NYPD Arrest 19 Lucchese Mobsters, Associates; Bust Includes Union Crooks - National Legal & Policy Center
There’s nothing like an early morning roundup to serve as a reminder that Mafia control over labor unions isn’t quite history yet. And lately many people in the New York City area are breathing a bit more freely. On May 31, FBI agents and NYPD cops arrested 19 members and associates of the Lucchese crime family on federal charges for crimes including wire fraud, racketeering, drug trafficking and murder committed over a 17-year period. According to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Manhattan, 15 of the defendants were taken into custody and the four others already were in custody on other charges. Two arrestees, underboss Steven Crea (in left photo) Sr. and consigliere Joseph DiNapoli, had been involved with construction union extortion and bid-rigging conspiracies.
Two Indicted In $6.6 Million Health Care Fraud Against Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield And Auto Workers Union
NEWARK, N.J. – A former union official and an insurance broker have been charged in connection with their roles in conspiring to defraud Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield and the United Auto Workers (UAW) Local 2326 Health Care Plan of millions of dollars, U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman announced today.
Sergio Acosta, 66, of Passaic New Jersey, formerly the president of Local 2326, and Lawrence Ackerman, 53, of Old Tappan, New Jersey, were both indicted by a federal grand jury on one count each of conspiring to defraud Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield and one count each of conspiring to defraud the union’s self-insured health care plan. An arraignment for both defendants will be scheduled at a later date.
Top prosecutor Carmen Ortiz: Teamsters members used 'thug tactics' to get 'no-work' jobs
BOSTON - "Rogue" members of the labor union Teamsters Local 25 are facing federal charges of attempted extortion linked to their picketing of "Top Chef" when the popular cooking show filmed in the Boston area in 2014.
U.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz, whose office released the grand jury's indictments on Wednesday, said the five Teamsters used "old school thug tactics to get no-work jobs."
"In the course of this alleged conspiracy, they managed to chase a legitimate business out of the City of Boston and then harassed the cast and crew when they set up shop in Milton," Ortiz said in a statement. "This kind of conduct reflects poorly on our city and must be addressed for what it is - not union organizing, but criminal extortion."
But you get your $100k a year to be a glorified pizza delivery boy, so it's all good right?
 
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https://nypost.com/2018/03/05/union-workers-are-making-42-per-hour-delivering-coffee-suit/
Manhattan’s largest development company says it was snookered into paying union workers $42 an hour — and a lot more for overtime — just to deliver coffee at its Hudson Yards megaproject.

The “coffee boys” were part of what Related Cos. calls a widespread scheme of “misconduct” by unions that inflated construction costs at the gleaming new mini-city by more than $100 million.
AND MY FAVORITE

Report: Former head of Massachusetts State Police union Dana Pullman facing fraud investigation
Dana Pullman, the former head of the State Police Association of Massachusetts, is reportedly facing a federal investigation into the finances of the organization.

The Boston Globe reports federal agents with the FBI and IRS are looking into the finances of the police union, specifically regarding the purchase of a $70,000 Chevy Suburban and tens of thousands of dollars spent at steakhouses.
 

Buck F

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One thing to keep in mind is that there's a difference between a strike at a manufacturing plant or distribution center where it's mostly employees or wholesale customers/vendors who have to make the decision whether to cross the picket line versus a grocery store where the retail customers are confronted with the picket line. I didn't cross the picket line because I don't have a horse in this race, I don't support either the strikers or management, I just want to go to the frigan store without a headache and have it fully stocked/staffed. When that wasn't happening, I went elsewhere. I did not appreciate the glares I got when I pulled up to the S&S the first day of the strike when I had no idea what was going on or the harassment/doxxing of some folks who did cross the picket lines whether it was to go grocery shopping or to the bank/pharmacy (I didn't go in that day, but it left a bad taste in my mouth). There was also the attitude that people should go to a different bank branch or pharmacy so they don't cross the picket line.

There was an article in the Globe today about how this was seen as a win for workers, a watershed moment because 75% of loyal shoppers stayed away from the stores. They're [mistakenly] attributing the fact that many people chose not to cross the picket line as support for the strikers. No one I know crossed the picket line, no one I know did it out of support for the strikers, they did it to avoid a hassle and empty/unstaffed stores. The article stated that S&S will lose some customers over this and the grocery store analyst they interviewed predicts that 95% of the customers will be back by Memorial Day. Huh? What? Aside from that being a rather rosy projection IMO, a 5% loss in customers/revenue is awful especially when your labor costs just went up.
 
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daekken

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One thing to keep in mind is that there's a difference when there's a strike at a manufacturing plant or a distribution center where it's mostly the employees or perhaps wholesale customers/vendors who have to make the decision whether to cross the picket line versus a grocery store where the retail customers are confronted with the picket line. I didn't cross the picket line because I don't have a horse in this race, I don't support either the strikers or management, I just want to go to the frigan store without a headache and have it fully stocked/staffed. When that wasn't happening, I went elsewhere. I did not appreciate the glares I got when I pulled up to the S&S the first day of the strike when I had no idea what was going on or the harassment/doxxing of some folks who did cross the picket lines whether it was to go grocery shopping or to the bank/pharmacy (I didn't go in that day, but it left a bad taste in my mouth). There was also the attitude that people should go to a different bank branch or pharmacy so they don't cross the picket line.

There was an article in the Globe today about how this was seen as a win for workers, a watershed moment because 75% of loyal shoppers stayed away from the stores. They're [mistakenly] attributing the fact that many people chose not to cross the picket line as support for the strikers. No one I know crossed the picket line, no one I know did it out of support for the strikers, they did it to avoid a hassle and empty/unstaffed stores. The article stated that S&S will lose some customers over this and the grocery store analyst they interviewed predicts that 95% of the customers will be back by Memorial Day. Huh? What? Aside from that being a rather rosy projection IMO, a 5% loss in customers/revenue is awful especially when your labor costs just went up.
I was kind of surprised, like four people at my office today said they crossed it at some point during the strike.
I didn't--but like you it was more "I don't want to deal with angry people and an empty store" than anything else. I have no skin in the game and didn't care about the strike's outcome, but I'm not gonna deal with that mess. So my not crossing the line does not equate to support. I suspect I am in the majority. I don't plan on going back for a few more days since one guy at work went there this morning and said the local one was in bad shape with expired milk and stuff.
 

RumRunner

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I crossed the picket line on their first or second day to shop on Sunday, which is the day I always shop. The following Sunday was Easter, so I didn't shop at all yet for this week. So it hasn't affected me much. The fact that didn't go again was not in support of the strikers, just that I didn't need to and didn't want to deal with empty shelves. I will be back because it's incredibly convenient for my location.
 

Asaltweapon

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As usual the shortsightedness of this particular Union is clearly on display. The strike ensured that current employees got to keep what's theirs but make no provision for new employees willing to do the job and who deserve a decent living wage and benefits. Moreover, the Union has successfully created a hierarchical and non-inclusive work environment for new employees who are forced to pay the same Union dues as the current employees doing the same work. But hey- you got yours even if it's only temporary! You just bit the hand that fed you.*

* part time and new employees do not get time and a half for weekends till they get 3 years in. A huge win for management.

Some union solidarity there boy.
Paging USPS to the courtesy phone.
Doesn't UPS play the same game now?
 

KBCraig

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In one video (in this thread, I think), the strikers were crossing their own picket line and parking in the S&S parking lot. They were the same ones covering their faces and declaring that there is a federal law that bans interviewing them while they're on strike.
 

KBCraig

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An example: the company I currently work for (I retired from carpentry), hired a contractor to install about a dozen steel double doors in existing jambs ($31k!), and one of them required an exterior lock cylinder, just like the door that was removed. Was never installed, so the "carpenter" was called back. He showed up with the old cylinder and handed it to me, so I asked if he had bored the door? "No, I'm not a locksmith" was his answer. I've installed hundreds of steel doors and NEVER seen a locksmith on the jobs....it's part of being a qualified carpenter.
So you're cutting in on the Locksmith Union?
 

drgrant

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One thing to keep in mind is that there's a difference when there's a strike at a manufacturing plant or a distribution center where it's mostly the employees or perhaps wholesale customers/vendors who have to make the decision whether to cross the picket line versus a grocery store where the retail customers are confronted with the picket line. I didn't cross the picket line because I don't have a horse in this race, I don't support either the strikers or management, I just want to go to the frigan store without a headache and have it fully stocked/staffed. When that wasn't happening, I went elsewhere. I did not appreciate the glares I got when I pulled up to the S&S the first day of the strike when I had no idea what was going on or the harassment/doxxing of some folks who did cross the picket lines whether it was to go grocery shopping or to the bank/pharmacy (I didn't go in that day, but it left a bad taste in my mouth). There was also the attitude that people should go to a different bank branch or pharmacy so they don't cross the picket line.
This is the big problem I always have with what I call trash grade unions... I still, to this day, don't understand what shitting on the customer is going to accomplish. You would think they would be handing out ice cream cones or something and handing out flyers. Joe or Jane average doesn't understand the union bullshit (and why should they, it's not their fight) and trying to ram it down their throat in that way probably isn't the best way to curry support......

-Mike
 
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