Gunshot Wound Kits

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Botach Tactical has an excellent GSW kit on sale. This kit features A QuikCklot ACS sponge, an Israeli Bandage as well as 2 rolls of compressed gauze. All of this comes packed a case that can be attached to a vest, belt etc.
This is an item every shooter should have in their range bag. If you use a LBV or a chest rig, these are a great addition to your rig.

Here is the link, also note there is a price break for quantity orders.

I have dealt with Botach in the past, and have found that if the item is in stock there is no problem, but, if the item is out of stock, you will never hear from them. So I would call and check stock status.
http://www.botachtactical.com/zqutrkit.html
 
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FPrice

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I think I have seen that and have been wondering if it was as good as advertised. Do you know if this has a shelf-life?
 
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I think I have seen that and have been wondering if it was as good as advertised. Do you know if this has a shelf-life?

I wil have to check to see if the QuikClot has a stated expiration date, My kit is in the car at the moment.

The items included in the kit are very good for what they are designed for, to stop serious bleeding from a gun shot wound, or any other serious penetrating trauma. This is not a first aid kit. The Israeli bandage can be used as a tourniquet, but I would add a C.A.T. tourniquet to the kit.
 

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I wil have to check to see if the QuikClot has a stated expiration date, My kit is in the car at the moment.

The items included in the kit are very good for what they are designed for, to stop serious bleeding from a gun shot wound, or any other serious penetrating trauma. This is not a first aid kit. The Israeli bandage can be used as a tourniquet, but I would add a C.A.T. tourniquet to the kit.

Thanks for the information. My intent for asking is to further develop and expand my ability to provide first aid in a wide variety of emergency situations. While I really do not foresee the need to treat a gunshot wound, as you say this may be useful for other trauma.

I was actively involved as a military logistics planner just prior to Y2K and as a result was exposed to many different scenarios and thoughts regarding emergency preparedness. One of the ones that stuck with me was to not be afraid to obtaining things (such as first aid supplies) which might be beyond your ability to use effectively. The reason was, in an emergency, you might be in a situation where something was needed and you just might have someone nearby who has the expertise to use what you have.

But close upon the heels of this advice was a warning not to go crazy and buy outlandish quantities of things that you might never use and which could go to waste in a short period of time. Buy wisely, and if you have short shelf-life items, have a plan to be able to use them and replenish your stocks with newer supplies.
 

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But close upon the heels of this advice was a warning not to go crazy and buy outlandish quantities of things that you might never use and which could go to waste in a short period of time. Buy wisely, and if you have short shelf-life items, have a plan to be able to use them and replenish your stocks with newer supplies.

Don't shoot yourself, Frosty, your country needs you!
 

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You might look at this as an alternative to the Israeli bandage. http://tinyurl.com/3z6ek3 . The best feature of both is that you can put them on singlehandedly, so you if you are shot and alone, you stand a chance.

Quik clot has it's own set of problems, the biggest of which is it gets very hot as it works. Hot enough to add burns to the GSW. There are some other products out there that do the same thing without that problem. These, http://tinyurl.com/4gbw3u are not cheap and I don't know about expiration dates. IIRC, the military is phasing out Quik Clot in favor of HemCon because of the heat issue.

Gary
 

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Gary,

Thanks for that info. I had heard about the heat problem but thought that the ad I read minimized it. I'll have to try to find and re-read what it said.
 

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Gary,

Thanks for that info. I had heard about the heat problem but thought that the ad I read minimized it. I'll have to try to find and re-read what it said.

My information is second hand, but the guy who gave it to me is very reliable. He teaches military guys and that is what they have related back to him. They also seem to like the H bandage better than the Israeli bandage.

Gary
 

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My information is second hand, but the guy who gave it to me is very reliable. He teaches military guys and that is what they have related back to him. They also seem to like the H bandage better than the Israeli bandage.

Gary

I may just try that H bandage. Thanks.
 
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I know some Delta guys here at Ft. Bragg that carry TAMPONS in their first aid kit. I was informed from first hand experience that they work awesome and saved some lives. When inserted into a GSW (HV rifle and pistol calibers make big holes that stuff like Kwick Clot either take too long to cauterize or just can't stop the bleeding) they expand to the size of the hole and make a great plug and also stop the bleeding FAST. It's a combat tested technique and a lot cheaper than other options.
 

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I know some Delta guys here at Ft. Bragg that carry TAMPONS in their first aid kit. I was informed from first hand experience that they work awesome and saved some lives. When inserted into a GSW (HV rifle and pistol calibers make big holes that stuff like Kwick Clot either take too long to cauterize or just can't stop the bleeding) they expand to the size of the hole and make a great plug and also stop the bleeding FAST. It's a combat tested technique and a lot cheaper than other options.

I've heard that as well, but never talked to anyone who has used it first hand. What's interesting, at least to me, is that each branch of the service has their own equipment, schooling, and standards for medical care. I'm somewhat familiar with what AFSOC guys use, but have no idea what the Army does.

Z-Medica, the makers of Quik Clot have a new product in development. It solves the exothermic problem with Quik Clot.

Here is a link to that story.

http://www.wired.com/medtech/health/news/2008/04/blood_clotting

LA Police Gear has it for $33.00, which is pretty cheap all things considered. I wouldn't be surprised to see some branch of the military adopt it. That's if they haven't already.

Gary
 
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MRJ

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I have a problem with jamming anything inside a puncture wound. If there are fragments of bone, cartilage, metal, you run the risk of pushing them into blood vessels, or organs and causing more damage. I'm not saying it's right or wrong, but I would verify with a surgeon before doing something like that here in the states. A surgeon and operating room is the only thing that is going to save a patient with a serious gunshot wound. The best thing we can do is rapidly transport. There is a TEMS medic on the board and he will know better, but here in the states, with quick access to trauma care, I wouldn't jam a tampon into a gunshot wound.
 

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I have a problem with jamming anything inside a puncture wound. If there are fragments of bone, cartilage, metal, you run the risk of pushing them into blood vessels, or organs and causing more damage. I'm not saying it's right or wrong, but I would verify with a surgeon before doing something like that here in the states. A surgeon and operating room is the only thing that is going to save a patient with a serious gunshot wound. The best thing we can do is rapidly transport. There is a TEMS medic on the board and he will know better, but here in the states, with quick access to trauma care, I wouldn't jam a tampon into a gunshot wound.

A couple of thoughts. Quick access to trauma centers isn't universal in the US. Boston has four Level 1 trauma centers and I think there are two others in the state. OTOH, there is one Level 1 trauma center in Washington state and it covers WA, ID, AK, and OR. A friend of mine is a paramedic in Iowa and the trip by ambulance to a trauma center can be a couple of hours or more.

If someone has life threatening bleeding, chances are that there is already damage to bone, vessels, and nerves. Stopping the bleeding is the first priority in those cases. Well, let me refine that a bit. Airway is always the first priority, but once that is secured, bleeding control becomes the priority.

You are absolutely right about a surgeon and an OR, but transporting a dead person isn't quite what they want you to do. Secure the airway, ensure ventilation, control life threatening hemorrhage, and transport to a trauma center if possible. There are cases where ground transport is out of the question and no helicopters are flying due to weather.

The preferred technique for controlling life threatening extremity hemorrhage is a tourniquet. Read that carefully before you reply.

Final thought. There is more than one TEMS trained medic on this list.

Gary
 

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Gary,

I appreciate the info on Washington State and Iowa. You stated that " If someone has life threatening bleeding, chances are that there is already damage to bone, vessels, and nerves. " Does this mean we should possibly injure further, even if their is an alternative to stop the bleeding that might not injure the patient?

I found your statement on the use of a tourniquet on life threatening extremity hemorrhage puzzling. It seems as if you would like me to challenge you on the subject. Why would I reply at all. We weren't discussing the topic. But if bringing up your knowledge of the use of a tourniquet makes you feel superior in any way - good on you.

As for your final thought. I'm glad there are more than one TEMS trained medic on the board - they have a wealth of knowledge on this subject and I would defer to their judgment as I did in my post. Are you a TEMS trained medic, Gary? If so, thank you for the job you do. I am an humble ma. licensed EMT-B.

Back to tampons. I for one will not use one in the treatment of a gunshot wound unless directed by medical control. You Gary - can stick one wherever you'd like.
 

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Gary,

I appreciate the info on Washington State and Iowa. You stated that " If someone has life threatening bleeding, chances are that there is already damage to bone, vessels, and nerves. " Does this mean we should possibly injure further, even if their is an alternative to stop the bleeding that might not injure the patient?

If there is an effective alternate, then use it. Stuffing an object into a wound shouldn't be your first choice, but it might be the only choice. Especially for a central body injury.

I found your statement on the use of a tourniquet on life threatening extremity hemorrhage puzzling. It seems as if you would like me to challenge you on the subject. Why would I reply at all. We weren't discussing the topic. But if bringing up your knowledge of the use of a tourniquet makes you feel superior in any way - good on you.

Actually, it was part of the answer as we were talking in general about gunshot treatment. Which could be expanded to any penetrating injury since the principle is the same.

As for your final thought. I'm glad there are more than one TEMS trained medic on the board - they have a wealth of knowledge on this subject and I would defer to their judgment as I did in my post. Are you a TEMS trained medic, Gary? If so, thank you for the job you do. I am an humble ma. licensed EMT-B.

As a matter of fact, I am. I'm a MA and NR certified paramedic. With 30 years of field experience in a large urban EMS system that is frequently seen on the TV news.

Back to tampons. I for one will not use one in the treatment of a gunshot wound unless directed by medical control. You Gary - can stick one wherever you'd like.

Mattitude wasn't talking about the civilian setting, at least I don't think so. Nor was I. Then again, non EMS trained folks can do what they think best and don't have to consult with anyone first. Unless OEMS has revised the basic equipment list, I don't think tampons are on it. If you want to use one from your personal collection, than you absolutely should consult with your medical control.

Speaking of GSW, how many have you seen over your career?

Gary
 
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Mattitude wasn't talking about the civilian setting, at least I don't think so. Nor was I. Then again, non EMS trained folks can do what they think best and don't have to consult with anyone first. Unless OEMS has revised the basic equipment list, I don't think tampons are on it. If you want to use one from your personal collection, than you absolutely should consult with your medical control.

Speaking of GSW, how many have you seen over your career?

Gary

I was speaking of GSW's in a combat zone where big holes in humans are pretty common in Iraq at this moment. If you can stick a finger in a hole then I'm sure you can imagine the amount of blood that can come out of it, and in a fire fight good luck getting an ambulance on the scene in 10 minutes and off to a field hospital...which happens to be a tent. I would assume in a civilian setting there could be a lawsuit from inserting a feminine product into someone else, but if you are a victim with a large, bleeding hole then it would be your choice as to wether you would rather die by bleeding to death or worry about possibly pushing bone/foreign fragments into a blood vessel. For me...well if it will save my life I'm all for that, but of course YMMV.
 

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Gary,

I have never treated a gunshot wound. And I still don't think I would use a tampon on a gunshot wound. I also clearly stated this was my view, and doesn't make the technique right or wrong. I also said, here in the states, which implied ready access to a hospital. My cousin is chief of anesthesia at a hospital in Oakland, Ca. I'll ask him his opinion. He has worked on a few patients with gunshot wounds as well.

As I stated in my post - thanks for the work you do. I consider anyone in your line of work a hero. I was in N.Y.C. on 9/11 and the first responders were absolutely selfless. It's why I wanted to learn about it.
 

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Superglue

Superglue & a Kotex pad. Duck Tape & Leatherman. Fishing line and a needle.


What else would you want in the kit? Some Morphine
 
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