Gunshot first aid.

Lewitt

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There are always going to be variations in opinions, but I pride myself on taking as much real-time feedback as I can and comparing it to the clinical trials that are out there. I have no personal investment in the products, just in teaching what ACTUALLY works. I have updated my manuals many times over the years to accomodate for new advances and changed in medicine. Till atleast 2003 I was reccomending the original QC as the best alternative to bleeding out on the market, but things change. There's always a better mouse trap!

The 10th mountain guys I have spoken to hands down prefereed Celox but they did say that the QC gauze and the QC "teabags" were ok. I choose to reccomend Celox gauze bc it can also be used to treat thermal injuries which are common in OCONUS enviroments.

Additionally, you have to keep one thing in mind; This product is designed for one use and one use only which is the treatment of an UNCONTROLLED EXTREMITY HEMMHORRAGE, nothing else. You only tear the package when your battle dressing AND tourniquet have failed. Ochmude I'd love to talk t oyour buddy if he's willing.

Lewitt
 
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Have you looked at his experience? Have you ever attended one of his classes? Have you ever talked to anyone who attended a class that he has taught? I'm guessing NO. Instead, you jump on him when you have no idea what his experience or curriculum is.

Perhaps if you were read more posts than you make, you may learn something new around here. You already know what my problem with you is: You couldn't hit the broadside of a barn with an M&P compact and you go around posting that that the gun sucks, that M&P's suck. You post in EVERY thread about M&P's that your glock 17 is better and it conceals better than an M&P. Just about anybody would shoot better with a 17 than compact M&P!
Oh, so your problem with me is because I hated my M&P?? Wow, that's mature.. I was not jumping over anyone, you decided that you know my thoughts.. Mike you are a little prick, pretending to be a nice guy.. At least with me what you see is what you get.. oh, and my Glock 17 is wayyyy better than my M&P for ME!!!! I couldn't care less what anyone else shoots with.. BTW!! I have a G34 now..
 
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wolf223

military medicine is MILITARY MEDICINE

unless you are out in remote areas, EMS is minutes away.... basic first aid, 1st responder (if that) is all one really needs.

if you want to be a bad-ass paramedic or combat medic, go enlist in the military and go Special Ops. again, Quick Clot, Tourniquets, and even some of those simple "clotting" bandages DO have side-effects... like Gonzo said, LET ME DIE. [laugh]

i'm going to agree with jenlynn on this...

now where is my field surgeon / circumcision kit
 

drgrant

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Kids, can we take the Glock vs M+P crap out of the thread, please? PM each other or something. Or start a thread in Firearms about it. Anything, just, not here.

-Mike
 
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wolf223

http://www.myguidon.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=12362&Itemid=39

funny, speaking of basic CPR and first aid... there have been similar stories across the US, even MA. of all the stories (hundreds), i recall the ONE in MA were the troop actually used a tourniquet.

it's NOT always sexy bandages, advanced airways, sticking IVs and giving morphine... [laugh]


Spc. Jacob Spinks, Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 92nd Military Police Battalion, 4th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade, became a real life hero, June 25. Spinks was driving home from Wellston, Mo., when a Missouri State Trooper, Sgt. Brandon White, passed him at a high rate of speed responding to a “shots fired call.” When Spinks came around a corner, he saw the trooper’s vehicle roll several times in front of him and strike a tree.

Spc. Jacob Spinks receives an Army Achievement Medal from Command Sgt. Maj. Angela Flournoy and Lt. Col. Bill Benner, 92nd MP Bn.commander.

“When I got out of the car, I blocked off the road and me and the other person that was there looked in the car and saw that the officer wasn’t breathing,” said Spinks. “So we started to do CPR and in just a matter of seconds he began breathing on his own. After that I checked behind him and made sure that he wasn’t bleeding anywhere else while the other person called 911.”

Spinks received five stitches in his hand from cutting himself on broken glass while helping White. His quick thinking and CPR knowledge came from taking the Army Combat Lifesaver Course.

“We had a hard time identifying who it was that opened up Sgt. White’s airways that night because (Spinks) didn’t stick around to get accolades or anything,” said Cpt. Gregory Kindle, Troop Commander of F Troop, Missouri State Highway Patrol. “We really appreciate what he did.”


Spinks was awarded an Army Achievement Medal by his battalion commander, Lt. Col. Bill Benner for his brave act, June 30, at the battalion organizational day.

Benner said, “Spc. Spinks’ actions epitomize the Army’s Warrior Ethos to never leave a fallen comrade and the battalion’s motto of ‘On the Watch.’”

“I think anyone that would’ve driven up to that would’ve done the same thing I did and tried to help. I was just at the right place at the right time,” he said.
 

Lewitt

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Sir,

I'd like to run another class in Sept or Oct. I'll run it up the flag pole and if I can get enough interest we'll do it.

The class will be 4 hours of lecture and 4 hours of range time doing self care, buddy care, and rescue drills.

I'll teach EVERYTHING you really need to know about Hemostatic Powders (there's a lot), self care under fire, buddy care under fire, POW protocols for weapons manipulation and securing, engaging threats while treating or moving an injured party, applying tourniquets while maintaining situational awarenes, etc etc etc.

Anyone who has taken my class will tell you I speed talk for 4 hours trying to get it all in there. An 8 hour class will have time to absorb the materiel and play with the 2 5,000 dollar trauma manaquins I use (yes I can teach you to intubate them if you want!). We'll do live fire rescues, care under fire drills and any other sadistic/fun stuff I can think of.

It would be a serious good time. Anyone who's serious, please send me a PM with your specific interests so I can be sure to address it in the curriculum and your level of participation in our armed society (LEO, Military, Armed Citizen, etc).

Train hard and stay safe!

Bill Lewitt
 

GSG

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military medicine is MILITARY MEDICINE

unless you are out in remote areas, EMS is minutes away.... basic first aid, 1st responder (if that) is all one really needs.

In general I agree, but I think that this is very applicable in an ice storm, hurricane, or other disaster type situation. Heck, those hunters who keep getting shot by their dogs could probably benefit from it too. [laugh]
 

Lewitt

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In general I agree, but I think that this is very applicable in an ice storm, hurricane, or other disaster type situation. Heck, those hunters who keep getting shot by their dogs could probably benefit from it too. [laugh]

Roger that. Not to mention, as someone who works INSIDE the metro boston EMS system, you'ld be surprised how long it can take to get an ambulance. Picture this; The 2 ambulances in your town are out on calls. This happens all the time. Now you're getting an ambulance from out of town mutual aid drving around lost looking for you as you bleed. I find it interesting that a group of people who advocate the responsible ownership of guns would say "just wait for the ambulance. Isn't that the same as the anti-gun crowd saying "just wait for a cop?"

Lewitt
 
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wolf223

Roger that. Not to mention, as someone who works INSIDE the metro boston EMS system, you'ld be surprised how long it can take to get an ambulance. Picture this; The 2 ambulances in your town are out on calls. This happens all the time. Now you're getting an ambulance from out of town mutual aid drving around lost looking for you as you bleed. I find it interesting that a group of people who advocate the responsible ownership of guns would say "just wait for the ambulance. Isn't that the same as the anti-gun crowd saying "just wait for a cop?"

Lewitt

did you actually read my posts or just trying to sell more classess?

i'm all for first aid, CPR, first responder training. however, what your doing is wrong. your trying to lead keyboard commandoes to think they practice interventions that they aren't trained to do. there are keyboard commandoes on this board who will probably pour quick clot on someone giving birth because of you. don't twist what i wrote to sell classes. [rolleyes]

PS: do you have a website? company? i've already asked around "the community" and no one seems to know who you are. where do you teach CE / CEUs?
 
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J

Jose

did you actually read my posts or just trying to sell more classess?

i'm all for first aid, CPR, first responder training. however, what your doing is wrong. your trying to lead keyboard commandoes to think they practice interventions that they aren't trained to do. there are keyboard commandoes on this board who will probably pour quick clot on someone giving birth because of you. don't twist what i wrote to sell classes. [rolleyes]

PS: do you have a website? company? i've already asked around "the community" and no one seems to know who you are. where do you teach CE / CEUs?

There are MANY parts of this country where someone IN THEIR HOME is 20 to 45 minutes away from any EMS help.

The ability to stop massive bleeding from puncture or amputation wounds (as sometimes happen when working around farm machinery) without waiting for EMS can be the difference between life and death.

And who cares if you don't know who Bill Lewitt is?
 
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There are MANY parts of this country where someone IN THEIR HOME is 20 to 45 minutes away from any EMS help.

The ability to stop massive bleeding from puncture or amputation wounds (as sometimes happen when working around farm machinery) without waiting for EMS can be the difference between life and death.

And who cares if you don't know who Bill Lewitt is?

I agree, but isn't bleeding control covered in basic first aid / first responder training? Also, isn't scene safety the first thing taught in every first responder class? If your not a police officer or in a war zone and someone is shooting at you, I think you might have more things to worry about than providing first aid to anyone.
 
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wolf223

did YOU read what i wrote? [cheers]

[rolleyes]


There are MANY parts of this country where someone IN THEIR HOME is 20 to 45 minutes away from any EMS help.

The ability to stop massive bleeding from puncture or amputation wounds (as sometimes happen when working around farm machinery) without waiting for EMS can be the difference between life and death.

And who cares if you don't know who Bill Lewitt is?
 
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Gonzo your safe.. they took it out of all the kits.. now they got some kind of special gauze that you stuff in the wound..... works like quick clot but without the vicious chemical burn

it is quick clot. just in a different form. the new formulations have reduced the exothermic side effect of the original formula.
But if gonzo wants to die based on old info, so be it. I get paid the same either way.
 

GSG

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There are MANY parts of this country where someone IN THEIR HOME is 20 to 45 minutes away from any EMS help.

The ability to stop massive bleeding from puncture or amputation wounds (as sometimes happen when working around farm machinery) without waiting for EMS can be the difference between life and death.

Also, if you're unfortunate enough to get tagged by an active shooter, chances are you're not getting help for a long time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_David_Sanders

By the time the gunmen arrived, the cafeteria was nearly empty. Sanders then made his way upstairs to the hall, trying to get students to safety by hiding them in classrooms when he was shot from behind by Eric Harris. He was hit in the torso, both shoulders, head and neck. He was carried into a science lab by two other teachers where he lay on the ground and bled to death waiting for help. SWAT teams did not reach Sanders until three hours after Harris and Klebold had killed themselves, by which time he was dead.

The students who were providing him care put the below sign in the window of the science classroom where he bled to death.

View attachment 13613

Sometimes help is a long way off, even when they're only a few feet away from you.
 
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I took an Immediate Action Medical Class given by Tactical Response down in Va. The class was taught by two SF Medics and it was one of the best courses I ever took in my life. I have been trained as a first responder and this course was above and beyond that. It doesn't just apply to gun shot injuries, the training I received is practical and can save lives in a lot of situations. If you carry a gun you need this training.
http://www.tacticalresponse.com/course.php?courseID=36
 
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did you actually read my posts or just trying to sell more classess?

i'm all for first aid, CPR, first responder training. however, what your doing is wrong. your trying to lead keyboard commandoes to think they practice interventions that they aren't trained to do. there are keyboard commandoes on this board who will probably pour quick clot on someone giving birth because of you. don't twist what i wrote to sell classes. [rolleyes]

PS: do you have a website? company? i've already asked around "the community" and no one seems to know who you are. where do you teach CE / CEUs?

Sir, respectfully, if you haven't taken one of the man's classes, you don't have the knowledge to be able to conclude anything about what he is doing, much less that it is "wrong."

Lewitt has been doing this for a long time. I took a mini-class/orientation to hemostatic powders given by Bill years ago at the annual MLEFIAA Instructor Conference. I also took a long, single day LE course he gave at SIG. He has certain material to teach, but he does somewhat tailor the class to the experience level of the room, which is one of the things I look for in an instructor. I learned a lot each time, and with the new technology, I am probably overdue for another one of his classes.
 
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Sir, respectfully, if you haven't taken one of the man's classes, you don't have the knowledge to be able to conclude anything about what he is doing, much less that it is "wrong."

Lewitt has been doing this for a long time. I took a mini-class/orientation to hemostatic powders given by Bill years ago at the annual MLEFIAA Instructor Conference. I also took a long, single day LE course he gave at SIG. He has certain material to teach, but he does somewhat tailor the class to the experience level of the room, which is one of the things I look for in an instructor. I learned a lot each time, and with the new technology, I am probably overdue for another one of his classes.

You do know what that thing in his sig line is, right? He's more qualified than most to have an opinion on this matter.
 
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