Fortyfive years ago, I tasted my first bite.

Buck F

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My first experience w it was back in the late 80’s in Lyndhurst NJ, there was this little hole in the wall Korean joint down the street. One day I decide to check it out, I’m the only non-Asian in there, they didn’t know what to do w me. Whatever you ordered, they always came out with multiple small dishes of strange but delicious appetizers. I had trouble figuring out what I ordered versus what they serve everyone for the appetizer thing (their version of the chips and salsa on the table at Mexican joints). Fell in love w kimchi and a lot of other stuff that I still have no idea what it was.
 

richc

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A buddy of mine who has since died started dating a Chinese woman.

She invited him over for dinner with one of her good friends. The friend told him that cooking turtle soup for a guest was a real sign of respect. And as he had lived in the New Orleans area for years he had eaten plenty of interesting dishes. So turtle soup was fine.

She serves him a bowl and he gets ready to dive in. In his spoon he finds something big at the bottom of the soup bowl and scoops it up.

As said large object is brought into view he sees the turtle looking back at him. He freaks and throws the thing across the room while yelling bloody murder. Absolutely scared the $hit out of him.

His date bursts into tears not understanding his outburst. The friend explains that the head of the turtle is given to the guest of honor and is a very high level of respect indeed. He announces loudly that he never, ever wants to see something like that again.

And now the rest of the story... he married her. And a couple years later he died.

I often wondered if he ended up in a soup for her new boyfriend...

:)
 

Uzi2

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if you got any pointers I'm all ears. lol. making toast and boiling pasta is about it for me as far as culinary skills.
I use my own pickling cukes here grown from seed. National Pickilng Cuke or #57 Pickling Cuke( nothing to do with Heinz)
but thats not important.

I wash the fresh picked 5-7 inch pickling cukes in cold water, cut 1/4 inch off the blossom end( opposite stem ) then slice them into spears, usually 4-6 pieces per cuke depending on girth. Having different size spears aids in getting the jar packed tight.
Pack the spears in clean guart jars, per jar add 1 generous tsp pickling spice, a couple of spriggs of fresh dill,( you can use dry dill also but remember the flavor is more concentrated in dried stuff), a couple of smashed peeled garlic cloves,

Making the brine:
In large stainless pot, put enough distilled white vinegar to have about 1 1/2 to 2 cups per jar, add coarse pickling salt (about 1/2 cup) and bring to a boil. You can also add a little sugar.....a couple of tbsp. You can also slightly dilute the vinegar but I don't, it helps them keep.
Pour hot liquid into the jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace, place lids on and rings (just finger tight)....look up what finger tight is in canning....you want the jar lid to be able to "burp" in the water bath.

Boiling Water bath jars for 10 mins, making sure jar tops are covered by an inch of water. DON'T OVER PROCESS THEM OR THEY'LL BE MUSHY.

There are ways to make pickles crunchy, one method is put a fresh grape leave in each jar. Others are chemicals ( which I don't use.)

Remove from water bath and let cool, you should hear the lids pop when they seal. Refrigerating them before serving enhances flavor and crispness. Enjoy.
 

LuvDog

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Kimchi is something most people love or hate. Since I grew up eating it, it’s a staple in our house. The home made stuff is always better than commercial store bought.

And in a “don’t knock it until you try it” dare... give it a try with breakfast foods. I’m telling you kimchi and pancakes or waffles and syrup is good.
 

PennyPincher

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Kimchi

Description
Kimchi, a staple in Korean cuisine, is a famous traditional side dish of salted and fermented vegetables, such as napa cabbage and Korean radish, made with a widely varying selection of seasonings including gochugaru, spring onions, garlic, ginger, and jeotgal, etc.

Fermented vegetables? My pasty, white Irish ass, calls that garbage. The thought of a dish whose primary ingredient is fermented cabbage... I will pass.
I am happy for you that you found a good recipe.
you ever eat sauer kraut?
 

PennyPincher

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Kimchi is something most people love or hate. Since I grew up eating it, it’s a staple in our house. The home made stuff is always better than commercial store bought.

And in a “don’t knock it until you try it” dare... give it a try with breakfast foods. I’m telling you kimchi and pancakes or waffles and syrup is good.
I have banned myself from learning how to make kimchi. I have a restaraunt that makes their own nearby. They will sell it in containers if you ask as long as you go after lunch and before dinner. I usually get 2 small containers, sometimes 2 large ones. I will eat that stuff a couple times a day until it's gone. Thankfully I don't shop that side of town all that often so I don't get it frequently. It's like crack it's so good! Very addictive!
 

Uzi2

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Kimchi is something most people love or hate. Since I grew up eating it, it’s a staple in our house. The home made stuff is always better than commercial store bought.

And in a “don’t knock it until you try it” dare... give it a try with breakfast foods. I’m telling you kimchi and pancakes or waffles and syrup is good.
I've not tried it with pancakes or waffles but I do put it on roast beef and tuna sandwiches pretty regularly. I have many times eaten kimchi and hot buttered rice for breakfast. [thumbsup] [thumbsup]
 

SpaceCritter

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Kimchi is something most people love or hate. Since I grew up eating it, it’s a staple in our house. The home made stuff is always better than commercial store bought.

And in a “don’t knock it until you try it” dare... give it a try with breakfast foods. I’m telling you kimchi and pancakes or waffles and syrup is good.
Interesting, though I'm still partial to my kimchi and sardines. [grin]
 

H-minus

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I love Korean BBQ so much my wife bought me a tabletop Korean BBQ grill for the dining room table. We're both Scots-Irish but she can whip up some pork belly, short rib, beef tongue, and tabletop Bulgogi like a first generation Korean. She tosses kimchi right there on grill next to the sizzling meat. So glad I no longer have to travel to the PRM for Korean BBQ. Hers is just as good if not better than the handful of KBBQ restaurants in Mass.

The downside is I've gained 15 pounds since she bought that damn grill.

IWATANI Smokeless Korean barbecue grill "YAKIMARU"
 
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jpk

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Fermented vegetables? My pasty, white Irish ass, calls that garbage. The thought of a dish whose primary ingredient is fermented cabbage... I will pass.
I am happy for you that you found a good recipe.
Yea but bloody potatoes in ANY form are spectacular.....(they are in point of fact but for arguments sake.....)

Since when did a fooking Irishman ever turn down ANYTHING that was fermented.......
 

Darksideblues42

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I'm still experimentng with different recipes, but this will give you the basic idea.
There are tons of things that can be added and I'm waiting on ingredients. Fish sauce, a source of Korean raddish, Korean sea salt, more red pepper, etc.
The above recipe will give you a delicious start. Experiment from there.

Best Korean Pepper Flakes I have found in a long while.
View: https://smile.amazon.com/Tae-kyung-Korean-Pepper-Flakes-Gochugaru/dp/B005G8IDTQ/ref=sr_1_5?crid=3SERUMD863YED&keywords=gochugaru&qid=1575381119&sprefix=goch%2Caps%2C135&sr=8-5



Mu (the radish) is hard to find, but there is a store in Framingham that gets it occasionally. (Formosa Asian Market)

I made this with Daikon and love it.


Korean White Radish Kimchi (Dongchimi)


Ingredients
  • 8 medium Korean radishes (if you can't find, use Daikon) (peeled and sliced into 1-inch pieces)
  • 6 Tbsp sea salt
  • 4 Tbsp sugar
  • 4 cloves of Garlic (peeled and thinly sliced)
  • 3 to 4 green onions (sliced into 2-inch pieces)
  • 10 cups of water (about 2 quarts)
Steps to Make It
  1. Coat radishes with 3 tablespoons salt and 2 tablespoons sugar. Let stand for 1 day at room temp.

  2. After 1 day, dissolve 3 tablespoons salt and 2 tablespoons sugar into warm water.

  3. Add liquid to salted radishes, garlic, and green onions. Let stand for 1 to 2 days at room temperature.

  4. When broth has achieved a tart, vinegary flavor, store in refrigerator.

  5. To serve, ladle vegetables and generous amount of broth into a cup or small bowl.

  6. It's best to make this kimchi in a large glass jar, but whatever container you use, make sure to leave room at the top for the gases released during the fermentation process.
 

ReluctantDecoy

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I absolutely hated kimchi the first time I tasted it like 15 years ago, but have grown to enjoy it the last 5 years. If straight up kimchi is a little much for you, maybe start with kkakdugi (pickled radish cubes in a similar spicy marinade). They are, in my opinion, a bit easier to approach for first timers. Like a very spicy pickle.

For kimchi, it was the smell that put me off. The taste is actually not entirely foreign. Hot (spicy), garlicky, and sour. The fermented smell though...that took a while to get used to. As someone else mentioned, I started added a tiny piece in with bulgogi or galbi in a lettuce wrap. Add in a perilla leaf, thin cut daikon, and scallions, and the favor profile is ridiculously good.
 

MuzzleDiscipline

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I was once fortunate enough to have developed a friendship with a Korean Vet who had brought back a Korean wife. She in turn had brought her Korean mother. The family has legit roots in the Korean Royal family line and were very culturally active preserving Korean Traditions.

This meant when going to their house for holidays after they discovered I love spicy food, beef, Kimchi, and eating with chopsticks was an amazing experience of culinary and cultural excesses. The only equivalent celebration for me was Christmas Eve and Christmas Day in Brooklyn with my Italian in-laws who really were very much more American.

I have never had the courage to try to make my own Kimchi but this might have just changed. thanks
 

Uzi2

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Best Korean Pepper Flakes I have found in a long while.
View: https://smile.amazon.com/Tae-kyung-Korean-Pepper-Flakes-Gochugaru/dp/B005G8IDTQ/ref=sr_1_5?crid=3SERUMD863YED&keywords=gochugaru&qid=1575381119&sprefix=goch%2Caps%2C135&sr=8-5



Mu (the radish) is hard to find, but there is a store in Framingham that gets it occasionally. (Formosa Asian Market)

I made this with Daikon and love it.


Korean White Radish Kimchi (Dongchimi)


Ingredients
  • 8 medium Korean radishes (if you can't find, use Daikon) (peeled and sliced into 1-inch pieces)
  • 6 Tbsp sea salt
  • 4 Tbsp sugar
  • 4 cloves of Garlic (peeled and thinly sliced)
  • 3 to 4 green onions (sliced into 2-inch pieces)
  • 10 cups of water (about 2 quarts)
Steps to Make It
  1. Coat radishes with 3 tablespoons salt and 2 tablespoons sugar. Let stand for 1 day at room temp.

  2. After 1 day, dissolve 3 tablespoons salt and 2 tablespoons sugar into warm water.

  3. Add liquid to salted radishes, garlic, and green onions. Let stand for 1 to 2 days at room temperature.

  4. When broth has achieved a tart, vinegary flavor, store in refrigerator.

  5. To serve, ladle vegetables and generous amount of broth into a cup or small bowl.

  6. It's best to make this kimchi in a large glass jar, but whatever container you use, make sure to leave room at the top for the gases released during the fermentation process.
Thanks for the amazon link to the pepper flakes. I just bought another brand the other day but willing to give your recommendation a try on my next purchase.

As soon as I find a source for Korean raddishes I'm going to try a batch of kaktugi. I always liked the change in the kimchi served in Korea from summer to fall/winter.
 

citoriguy

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Good kimchi is amazing, but bad kimchi is horrible. One of my best friends in high school was South Korean and his mom made the best kimchi I’ve ever tasted. She used to send me back to college after break/vacation with a jar or two,
 
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