Fortyfive years ago, I tasted my first bite.

Uzi2

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In December of 1975 I was on a charter flight out of SeaTac airport on Nippon Airlines on my way to South Korea....my first premanent party assignment as a PFC in the Army.
Upon arrival in S. Korea I was immediately introduced to the local food and drink. Kimchi is one of their staples and served with virtually every meal.
Having a commercial source of it that I really liked here in the states for all these years, I never ventured into making my own. It started getting rather expensive for what it is, THEN, the store I bought it from changed brands.....the new stuff was not very good. So a couple of weeks ago I bought the ingredients and made a batch of my own. I'll never buy another jar of Kimchi again.

Those who like it usually love it. Those who don'tl......well sorry for your problem. [smile]
image.jpeg
 

Uzi2

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Tell us what you did. I tried making kimchi years ago. What I got was a really stinky fridge.
There's hundreds of different recipes....pick one.

Depending on how much you want to make: I make large batches.

4 lg heads Nappa cabbage
About 6 scallions finely chopped or jullienned depending on your preference.
Sea salt
5 cloves garlic or more to taste.
3 pears( as long as they are sweet, doesn't matter what kind)....it's sugar to aid fermentation, can also add a tablespoon of sugar to that.
Ground Korean red chilli peppers.....no seeds.

Chop cabbage into 1" plus pieces......removing core.
Place in bin and salt with 1 1/2 cups coarse sea salt ( Korean stuff is supposedly the best, waiting on some now from online to compare to local bought stuff.)
Add enough cold water to just about cover cabbage after salting, cover and let sit for 4-5 hours.

When time is up, remove cabbage and rinse well with cold water in colander to remove excess salt. Cabbage should be somewhat wilted but still crunchy.

Place garlic, pears( ripe, peeld and cut up) and a little bit of water( distilled water is actually better) in food processor and liquify.
Pour liquid into stainless or glass bowl and add ground red pepper.....about 1/3 cup per head of cabbage.
Mix into a loose paste. Add to cabbage and WEARING GLOVES, mix until well coated, then place in clean jars or large crock. Do not tighten lids of canning jars, leave them loose to prevent fermentation explosion. Leave at room temp for 72 hrs min (longer if you live in a cold tent) and the contents should show signs of fermentation....ie: carbondioxide and bubbling.
When fermented for a few days, taste and place in fridge to cool which enhances flavor.

I'm still experimentng with different recipes, but this will give you the basic idea.
There are tons of things that can be added and I'm waiting on ingredients. Fish sauce, a source of Korean raddish, Korean sea salt, more red pepper, etc.
The above recipe will give you a delicious start. Experiment from there.
 
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fencer

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Kimchi

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Kimchi, a staple in Korean cuisine, is a famous traditional side dish of salted and fermented vegetables, such as napa cabbage and Korean radish, made with a widely varying selection of seasonings including gochugaru, spring onions, garlic, ginger, and jeotgal, etc.

Fermented vegetables? My pasty, white Irish ass, calls that garbage. The thought of a dish whose primary ingredient is fermented cabbage... I will pass.
I am happy for you that you found a good recipe.
 

Uzi2

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Kimchi

Description
Kimchi, a staple in Korean cuisine, is a famous traditional side dish of salted and fermented vegetables, such as napa cabbage and Korean radish, made with a widely varying selection of seasonings including gochugaru, spring onions, garlic, ginger, and jeotgal, etc.

Fermented vegetables? My pasty, white Irish ass, calls that garbage. The thought of a dish whose primary ingredient is fermented cabbage... I will pass.
I am happy for you that you found a good recipe.
Irish cooking.......the famous Corned beef and cabbage. 😄

The only difference is the red peppers and Kimchi is pre fermented, instead of bloating you while fermenting in your gut.

If you've never tried it, you have no reasonable grounds to criticize.

Fermented foods of all types are some of the healthiest foods you can eat....or drink including BEER.
 

Uzi2

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I've been expanding my palate lately cooking, but after Googling Kim chi, I'm not sure I'm ready 😂😂😂😂🤣🤣🤣🤣
Thats what every GI I ever saw said while inserting the first chop sticks of it into their mouths. From there on out, it was Kimchi and rice at the KATUSA snack bar twice a day for the rest of their 13 month tour of duty.
 

Roland Deschain

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Thats what every GI I ever saw said while inserting the first chop sticks of it into their mouths. From there on out, it was Kimchi and rice at the KATUSA snack bar twice a day for the rest of their 13 month tour of duty.
I shall give it a fair shake next time we decide to go out to eat lol
 

SpaceCritter

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Irish cooking.......the famous Corned beef and cabbage. 😄

The only difference is the red peppers and Kimchi is pre fermented, instead of bloating you while fermenting in your gut.

If you've never tried it, you have no reasonable grounds to criticize.

Fermented foods of all types are some of the healthiest foods you can eat....or drink including BEER.
Actually, corned beef and cabbage isn't especially Irish. Crubeens, colcannon, spiced beef, lamb stew, pan boxty, brown bread & butter, ...

That being said, I have a pasty white Irish ass, too, and still love kimchi. [grin]
 

drgrant

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There was a scientist at work who used to bring that into our building and heat? it in a microwave or something, I am grateful he now works in another building.... [laugh] Could be worse though we had a broad who used to make cheese popcorn in the microwave.... that shit smells like vomit when slightly burned ugh... blech.

View: https://youtu.be/oX1vp-fblx8
 

Picton

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I love kimchi, but I find its best if you think of it as a garnish, not an entree.

Fantastic with rice. Also, combined in a bite with bool kogi.
 

SpaceCritter

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There was a scientist at work who used to bring that into our building and heat? it in a microwave or something, I am grateful he now works in another building.... [laugh] Could be worse though we had a broad who used to make cheese popcorn in the microwave.... that shit smells like vomit when slightly burned ugh... blech.

View: https://youtu.be/oX1vp-fblx8
Never heard of heating it, though I have stirred it (chopped) into soup.

Funny story: I've mentioned in several other threads my notoriously stinky mountain bike gear. And probably mentioned I happen to be the treasurer of a chapter of a certain organization supporting said activity... one who's looking to retire from that position, mainly because I have to concentrate on the relocation to New Hampshire.

Well, to encourage them to expedite finding my replacement, at one meeting I showed up post-ride still in all my gear. (I may even have left my armor on, and I do believe I brought in my 5.11 RUSH12 pack that's gotten so stinky I've actually opened a support ticket with them over it.) Then while they ate pizza, I proceeded to sit there and dine on kimchi and sardines, and Epoisses, and told them I'd get progressively stinkier until replaced. (Still treasurer. Imagine that.)
 

SKumar

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Kimchi is 100% a superfood. It's so damn healthy that it must do some reverse-aging magic on you. Nice crunch, spicy, practically zero calories, mixes with anything, long shelf life. Love me some H-Mart kimchi!
 

Obie1

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If you don't bury it for a few months, it ain't real. Just be sure you remember not to bury it next to your guns.
 

Uzi2

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If you don't bury it for a few months, it ain't real. Just be sure you remember not to bury it next to your guns.
[thumbsup] [smile] Where I was, I lived among the poorest of the poor in the country at the time. The reason for burying it was temperature stability to aid in fermentation( 35-48 degrees F) Few if any had refrigeration in their hooches so it was their only option.
 

SKumar

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Also, I must note that Korean food has EXPLODED in recent years.

One Korean fusion place opened in Waltham. H-Marts are all the rage, especially their food courts. That Korean bbq in Medford center was packed on a wednesday night.
 

Buck F

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Kimchi

Description
Kimchi, a staple in Korean cuisine, is a famous traditional side dish of salted and fermented vegetables, such as napa cabbage and Korean radish, made with a widely varying selection of seasonings including gochugaru, spring onions, garlic, ginger, and jeotgal, etc.

Fermented vegetables? My pasty, white Irish ass, calls that garbage. The thought of a dish whose primary ingredient is fermented cabbage... I will pass.
I am happy for you that you found a good recipe.
Don’t let the fermented part throw you, the stuff really is amazing.
 
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