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First IDPA competition!

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In uspsa a miss can be handled if your fast enough through the course.

A miss in USPSA is always devastating. It's a 10 point penalty plus 5 lost points from the alpha you failed to hit.

Suppose the stage winner's time was 15 seconds with 130 points for an 8.7 hit factor. If you perform identically except for one mike, you're down to a 7.7 hit factor or 88% of stage points. You would need to shave 1.8 seconds off to achieve a tie, and if you try to "go faster" for the rest of the stage you'll just make it worse.
 

Happy feet

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On a longer 32 round course making up 1.8 seconds is doable. their is also a good chance the winner of the stage may make a mistake on the next stage if you couldn't make up the 1.8 sec. It's about the whole match not one stage. General constancy over all the stages usually wins over edging out a stage or two. Another senerio is as your finishing the stage you miss steel and hit slide lock....do you reload and take the steel? yes if you hit it first shot But if you miss again which is possible coming of the reload and being in a hurry because you just missed, then your worse of than if you just stopped took the miss and had a better time. (The natural reaction is to keep shooting till you knock that sucker down😀) Not generally being a stage winner I,ve seen my hit factor with a miss be consistant with my ranking because of my time ( which contributed to the miss)

Regardless Idpa is limited to 18 rounds and generally has shorter field courses (in the north east) making it much harder to make up for points down which are added to your time and the scoring is much more weighted towards accuracy ( including a smaller A zone) coming from uspsa it was a bit eye opening. In Idpa their would be no question you reload and take the steel.

Then again I,m a mid level shooter that apperciates practice score because the scoring math is beyond my comprehension level lol
 
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a73elkyss

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Any advice out there about first time IDPA competition ? I know it’s all about time and accuracy and safety, but should my concentration be on hitting targets or speed the first time around ? Or just finishing a stage without any major catastrophe.


Safety is key. Most of the Safety Officers are 100% comfortable with new IDPA shooters. They want you and everyone else to be safe, want you to be challenged, and want you enjoy your first experience so you come back.

This a laminated card I carry in my range bag of the "IDPA Official Range Commands" taken directly from the Rule Book.
These are the commands you will hear from the SO (Safety Officer) who most likely will be the closet person to you. There is usually an Assistant SO with you also. So basically, you will have two sets of eyes on you helping you and everyone else stay safe.
t8TadJL.jpg




This is the "B" side of the index card. These are NOT Rules, but just a few "Definitions" and personal interpretations.

O0jLydD.jpg




Sometimes during online discussions like these, you will hear lots of different acronyms, which can get confusing. For example, "Compooky" mentioned "DQ". Sorry, but it doesn't stand for Dairy Queen. It's a "Disqualification" that is bad enough that your match day is over and you will be asked to leave. There are other less severe penalties, all with their own "acronyms". You might want to download and go through the manual to get the full actual meaning. The manual is actually not bad, pretty straightforward and not overly long.
IDPA Rulebook

Equipment. Again, the rule book will explain what is acceptable and permitted. I know you mentioned your gun is a P320 X5 Legion (O.K. I'm jealous). Confirm you have the correct and are comfortable with your holster, enough magazines, magazine carrier, gun belt, cover garment, eyes, ears, and such. Oh yea, bring ammo. [wink]

When is your first match? A lot of IDPA matches have practice sessions on a separate day before the match. I'd suggest going to one to "get your feet wet".
Another idea is to offer to help in setup and tear down. Usually more hands are always welcome, as some of stages require many moving parts. Nothing wrong with getting your hands dirty. Plus, it builds character... so I've heard. [thumbsup]

When your squad goes to a new stage , the Safety Officer will go over the COF ( Course of Fire). I.E. where you start, where you can go, etc. If you don't understand a certain part, ask them to drill into a little more.

After a shooter is done shooting and the Safety Officer has declared the range safe, there is always a need to tape up the targets for the next shooter. This is another area were working as a team within a squad makes for a more enjoyable experience. Whatever you do, DON'T TAPE UP THE HOLES UNTIL AFTER THE SO has scored the target. Make sure the SO acknowledges to you that they have scored the target. Also, and this is just what I was instructed to do, if you are the next shooter, don't tape up the previous shooters targets. Let the others in your squad do it. As you are the next shooter, you want to save those few extra seconds or minutes to relax and be ready when the SO calls you to the line. I don't think that's an official rule, just what I do.

Make sure you update this post with your experience.

Enjoy, ask questions, and be safe. And congratulations on "getting out of your comfort zone".

These are just my thoughts, YMMV,

Jay
 

chris_1001

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A few friends do an intro to “action” shooting class at a really good idpa club. Might be worth going to (pm me).

I’m an idpa SO. Pay attention to what we ask of you. Be safe. I don’t care how slow you are. Be safe, listen, ask questions and follow directions.

I was new once as well. We all start out as a noob.

ETA: I’ve been a shooter since I was a kid. Got bored going to the range. Idpa was my first real introduction to action shooting. It re invigorated my interest. I shoot idoa/uspsa/3-gun and steel shoot and made some great friends.
 

EddieZoom

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Safety is key. Most of the Safety Officers are 100% comfortable with new IDPA shooters. They want you and everyone else to be safe, want you to be challenged, and want you enjoy your first experience so you come back.

This a laminated card I carry in my range bag of the "IDPA Official Range Commands" taken directly from the Rule Book.
These are the commands you will hear from the SO (Safety Officer) who most likely will be the closet person to you. There is usually an Assistant SO with you also. So basically, you will have two sets of eyes on you helping you and everyone else stay safe.
t8TadJL.jpg




This is the "B" side of the index card. These are NOT Rules, but just a few "Definitions" and personal interpretations.

O0jLydD.jpg




Sometimes during online discussions like these, you will hear lots of different acronyms, which can get confusing. For example, "Compooky" mentioned "DQ". Sorry, but it doesn't stand for Dairy Queen. It's a "Disqualification" that is bad enough that your match day is over and you will be asked to leave. There are other less severe penalties, all with their own "acronyms". You might want to download and go through the manual to get the full actual meaning. The manual is actually not bad, pretty straightforward and not overly long.
IDPA Rulebook

Equipment. Again, the rule book will explain what is acceptable and permitted. I know you mentioned your gun is a P320 X5 Legion (O.K. I'm jealous). Confirm you have the correct and are comfortable with your holster, enough magazines, magazine carrier, gun belt, cover garment, eyes, ears, and such. Oh yea, bring ammo. [wink]

When is your first match? A lot of IDPA matches have practice sessions on a separate day before the match. I'd suggest going to one to "get your feet wet".
Another idea is to offer to help in setup and tear down. Usually more hands are always welcome, as some of stages require many moving parts. Nothing wrong with getting your hands dirty. Plus, it builds character... so I've heard. [thumbsup]

When your squad goes to a new stage , the Safety Officer will go over the COF ( Course of Fire). I.E. where you start, where you can go, etc. If you don't understand a certain part, ask them to drill into a little more.

After a shooter is done shooting and the Safety Officer has declared the range safe, there is always a need to tape up the targets for the next shooter. This is another area were working as a team within a squad makes for a more enjoyable experience. Whatever you do, DON'T TAPE UP THE HOLES UNTIL AFTER THE SO has scored the target. Make sure the SO acknowledges to you that they have scored the target. Also, and this is just what I was instructed to do, if you are the next shooter, don't tape up the previous shooters targets. Let the others in your squad do it. As you are the next shooter, you want to save those few extra seconds or minutes to relax and be ready when the SO calls you to the line. I don't think that's an official rule, just what I do.

Make sure you update this post with your experience.

Enjoy, ask questions, and be safe. And congratulations on "getting out of your comfort zone".

These are just my thoughts, YMMV,

Jay

Good Stuff.

Regarding a DQ, although you will be done shooting for the day I would suggest you think about sticking around and helping your squad tape/reset/teardown. Easier said than done....because you are going to be beating yourself up. Learn from the mistake, shake it off and carry on.
 

a73elkyss

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Good Stuff. Regarding a DQ, although you will be done shooting for the day I would suggest you think about sticking around and helping your squad tape/reset/teardown. Easier said than done....because you are going to be beating yourself up. Learn from the mistake, shake it off and carry on.

I totally agree. I'm not a very experienced IDPA shooter, plus I'm constantly the higher scorer (not a good place to be, but I do enjoy the sport), so take that for what it's worth).

I guess I was reading a little to deeply into the rule book regarding DQ's and the wording of "not continue in any part of the IDPA match". I've only seen shooters who get DQ'd pack up their equipment and leave. Just my observation.


5.4 Disqualification (DQ)Disqualification means the shooter may not continue in any part of the IDPA match, may not reenter in another division, and may not shoot any side matches.


I do enjoy reading discussions like this as I get to learn new things.

Jay
 
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a73elkyss

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Ocsa in pembroke is having an intro to Idpa class on Jan 23rd, depending on where you live and your tolerance for cold, it's a great way to get started, also. As mentioned above going to an Idpa practice session is also a good idea

OP, @Happy feet suggestion is spot on. Again, not sure where you are located, but if you can't make it to Ocsa, consider WPRC IDPA in Boylston as they have a no cost practice session the Sunday before their Tier 1 matches the following Saturday. Check their calendar. As I personally know many of the WPRC IDPA staff, I can say that they are a great group of mentors and enjoy the sport immensely.

Hopefully you are a member of GOAL, which you should be, they have a INTRO to IDPA course. Although nothing as close to the Ocsa January class.

Jay
 

johnnymac101

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One thing I have found helpful is practice drawing from the holster at home. Getting the gun out and on target is something I can't do at my range.
Practice getting a consistent firm grip on your gun so you are not adjusting when you should be shooting.
I also use weighted dummy rounds which gives the gun a "real feel" in my hand.

Not to hijack the thread, but what at home training aids are shooters using? Anyone recommend a laser bullet system?
I get a few different ones popping up on my facebook now and then.
 

Wendell

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Any advice out there about first time IDPA competition? I know it’s all about time and accuracy and safety, but should my concentration be on hitting targets or speed the first time around? Or just finishing a stage without any major catastrophe.

Maybe you've read the rulebook already, I don't know. If you haven't yet read the rulebook, read it. Seriously. Some people don't, and then find themselves hurt and embarassed when they're impacted by a rulebook rule that they'd neglected to read (in advance of the match).
 

allen-1

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Maybe you've read the rulebook already, I don't know. If you haven't yet read the rulebook, read it. Seriously. Some people don't, and then find themselves hurt and embarassed when they're impacted by a rulebook rule that they'd neglected to read (in advance of the match).

And if you find it overwhelming, don't worry. Some, (many?), of the rules were implemented as people found creative ways to go around the existing rules.

There are a lot of jokes about a bunch of lawyers wearing fishing vests arguing about the rules.

Do, as Wendell said, read the rulebook. Try to get a sense of the basic rules from it.

 

andrew1220

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One thing I have found helpful is practice drawing from the holster at home. Getting the gun out and on target is something I can't do at my range.
Practice getting a consistent firm grip on your gun so you are not adjusting when you should be shooting.
I also use weighted dummy rounds which gives the gun a "real feel" in my hand.
Also good advice
 
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Not to hijack the thread, but what at home training aids are shooters using? Anyone recommend a laser bullet system?
I dunno.
All the lasers going to do is show you where the gun was pointing when you "fired" .......which that's exactly what the sights are for, and I'd submit dry fire is mostly about using the sights to predict where the bullet is going to go. Well...besides doing a billion reloads and draws and stuff.
 
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As long as I'm ruminating on crap whilst drinking my morning Joe in a quiet house I would also submit one difference between the 2 games is that in USPSA if your shooting a gun that is not gay you have better than half a box at your disposal. The choreography in an IDPA stage almost always if you shoot clean it will work out you dump one and make the reload that is going to be required at an advantageous time. If you miss the shit out of the steel or need a couple makeups you will end up caught flatfooted reloading, blowing any opportunity on the mover, and totally lost for the rest of the stage. USPSA making that "D" into an "A" is just a matter of a tenth of a second or so, and likely is not going to alter your plan on down the line.
 
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