FAA grounds future “Wings of Freedom” flights, cites lack of training, maintenance prior to fatal B-17 crash at Bradley

Reptile

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The Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday announced a Massachusetts foundation can no longer book passengers for flights on historic World War II-era aircraft after investigators found several safety violations while investigating the crash last fall of a B-17 bomber at Bradley International Airport that killed seven people.

In a letter to the Collings Foundation, Robert C. Carty, the deputy executive director of the FAA’s Flight Standards Service, notified the foundation that the FAA is immediately rescinding the waiver that allowed them to charter flights on vintage aircraft as part of its “Wings of Freedom” tour.

 
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Well, if you don't do things right, the hammer comes down. Sucks, because I would love to fly in something like that, but if they aren't taking training seriously, airplanes don't suffer fools.
 

deerdad

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They say lack of training. As for flying he had plenty of time with the amount of hrs he had. I know by watching old WW2 films on flight training they cut power back until stall to get a feel as what would happen. Did it descend faster than he anticipated with just the 3 engines? It was reported that a light tower was struck on the way in. No matter what, it will be pilot error just because of how those were made to stay in the air even with a engine failure. (maintenance big issue) Im kind of surprised there isn't any video of the incident except for the aftermath. People always have their phones out.
 
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My father helped rebuild that plane, he was the machinist for the parts that had to be made. I've been in it when i was a kid but never in the air with it. I'm not even going to tell him about this cause he's too old now he probably knew some of those people. I don't need him having a heart attack or stroke with all this other crap going on right now. Paul.
 

Dennis in MA

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My father helped rebuild that plane, he was the machinist for the parts that had to be made. I've been in it when i was a kid but never in the air with it. I'm not even going to tell him about this cause he's too old now he probably knew some of those people. I don't need him having a heart attack or stroke with all this other crap going on right now. Paul.
First time I read through I thought you meant after the crash. LOL. Cool for your dad, tho.

This is no big surprise. You can't just decide to take paying passengers up and not expect to be 100% on your toes with maintenance and training. You hold people's lives in your hands and they PRESUME you are 100% safe.

Tough day.
 

Broccoli Iglesias

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There is so much pork for BS in the Corona Vorus bill.

Why cant there be money to rebuild a B17, B25, B29, a Lancaster, 2 or 3 Mustangs, 2 or 3 Messerschmitt bf 109.

It would probably cost less than what is going g to some of these libraries and cultural centers that already get millions.
 

Reptile

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This is probably the death knell for these planes touring. I bet the money paid for flying in them exceeded the gate receipts for just viewing them.
I'm glad I got to see them up close and even from the inside at the Great New England Airshow the past 2 times it was held at Westover.

People were smaller in the 1940's.

I could barely move around when I went inside.
I felt claustrophobic trying to make my way about the inside of those planes.

I actually felt nauseous seeing how impossible it would be to crawl to the tail gunner turret.

Even in modern aircraft, the quarters are cramped.

Imagine trying to escape a downed aircraft - old or new - after crashing, being injured or upside down.

They train for that, though.
 
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