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Educate me on Phoenix, AZ

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by C. Stockwell, Jun 17, 2019.

  1. Hikes

    Hikes

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    I was out there for business a couple years ago and drove out to Tortilla Flat and ended up driving the Apache Trail (unpaved) all the way up to the Roosevelt Dam. At night. In a rental suv. Amazing experience, although i recommend going in daylight with plenty of water.
     
  2. C. Stockwell

    C. Stockwell NES Member

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    So I landed last night and ventured out of my hotel a couple times. Few things I've noticed:

    *Phoenix is the antithesis of New England in almost every conceivable way.
    *Its extremely dry. I feel like a dog. Once my nose gets too dry, I need to go inside and drink something.
    *There's not that many old people (50+) in Phoenix itself. They're probably all camped out near the golf courses in Scottsdale, etc. Downtown Phoenix is mostly yuppies, say 22-40. Its a very young, hipster/yuppie crowd.
    *Its extremely West Coast in nature.
    *People are friendly. Too friendly. [laugh] In New England, I'd say its normal to be polite to waitstaff but to keep them at a respectable social distance. You get a lot more "hey man", "you good man", "bro", etc. out here. Also, acting like a normal New England guy would probably offend people out here, like if I was to start being sarcastic or ironic.
    *Because of the dryness and heat, no one really walks around outside except skateboarders (there's some of them out here, that's not really a thing in New England cities probably because its banned), dog walkers, and people going to their cars. Cars are everywhere, thus so are parking garages and car parks. The city is designed around the automobile. I haven't been to the Old Town district yet.
    *The architecture lacks contextualism and is hyper-modern. Looks like a lot of pre-fab. Concrete, steel, etc. The thing I like about Providence and Boston is that I can walk around and be like "oh, Second Empire, I'm in X district of Boston on Y street." Or, "oh, brown brick buildings that look like they're falling apart, Benefit Street" in Providence. Maybe this just requires familiarization on my part, idk.
    *They mist water near the entrances of places, which I would imagine to be a waste in comparison to a fountain. But what do I know?
     
  3. headednorth

    headednorth NES Member

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    My aunts from Glendale can confirm. 100+ out there and theyre ok. 90 and humid here and theyre dying.
     
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  4. weekendracer

    weekendracer

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    They mist to cool the area.

    Older, smaller houses don't even have AC out there, they have swamp coolers.
     
  5. widnerkj

    widnerkj

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    Some newish houses only have swamp coolers.
     
  6. Spanz

    Spanz NES Member

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    where it is hot but dry...a swamp cooler can be VERY effective. (i.e. Phoenix)

    they do not work where it is high humidity, as evaporation is the method that lowers the temperature in the immediate area
     
    dingbat likes this.
  7. dingbat

    dingbat

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    Yup, with the relative humidities they see out there even at 118*F ambient wet bulb can be down below 72*F.
    Psychrometrics FTW!
     
  8. C. Stockwell

    C. Stockwell NES Member

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    Here's my summary of Phoenix as I sit in its airport waiting for my red eye flight back to Logan (TF Green involves connecting flights and costs $100 more on average).

    Phoenix proper and the surrounding suburbs are probably a good place to move to if you're a young professional who's tired of dealing with Mass BS, does not want to deal with snow, and wants to have more career opportunities and a somewhat equal salary to what's paid out by Mass companies in comparison to NH. Phoenix has 1.66 million people, NH as a state has 1.36 million. Phoenix is more conservative than NH and obviously Mass. If you're religious and Christian or Jewish, you'll feel more welcome in AZ than in NH or Mass. Mormons are relatively common. Most people do not swear and use the "gosh darn", "heck", etc. euphemisms. No one really gets sarcasm or dry humor.

    Phoenix has excellent food and drink options. The buildings somewhat confused me as most of the restaurants are white stucco or adobe and have all the doors closed (to keep the AC in), thus looking all the same and can be indistinguishable between each other or say an auto body shop. Craft beer was more or less ubiquitous to everywhere I went. I tried to eat at more local places than at tourist traps near my hotel. I saw things that could never exist in New England:

    *Combination bars and package stores, i.e. the store sold what it had on tap
    *CVS sells all manner of alcohol, from Andre "champagne" to Hennessy to vodka
    *Coffee shops that have full bars

    Like other deep red states that I've been to outside New England (GA, NC, AL, and now AZ), there's a clear racial divide between blue collar/service industry people and white collar/consumer people. The shitty neighborhoods are predominantly black and Hispanic and the nice neighborhoods are white. You can clearly tell when you've wandered off too far from the hotel and downtown area. That being said, Hispanic and Latin are very broad terms and include people who range from blond hair, blue eyed people to black people.

    Most of the non-AZ locals are Californians and Texans. The Californians seem entitled and not that bright and the Texans are, well, Texans.

    I expect to hear back from the people I interviewed with by tonight or tomorrow morning. If I get the job(s), I would move out in roughly August 2020. I wouldn't want to live in Phoenix itself, rather live near the mountains.
     
  9. widnerkj

    widnerkj

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    Sounds like a fairly good visit. I hope you get the job.
     
    C. Stockwell likes this.

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