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Cost-cutting strikes again

Machines

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Normally I don't post rant threads, but all the angry old men here can probably sympathize with me. I had a 3/4" drive Husky ratchet set from Home Depot. Solid mid-tier quality tool, made in Taiwan by the Apex Group (Crescent, Armstrong, Jacobs, Lufkin, etc.) and pretty cheap for what it is. Somebody prior to my ownership managed to break part of it, and I finally got around to exchanging it under warranty. So far so good. At the store they had both newly arrived sets and a couple dusty ones that'd been there for a few years. Naturally I took one not covered in dirt. Well, turns out the latest version no longer has a detent to keep the breaker bar head at 90°. So you have a big socket flopping around in the wind while you try to use it. Took it back and swapped it for a dusty version which still had the detent.

This just seems like an incredibly petty form of cost-cutting. They keep everything else the same and remove a few cents worth of parts that every reputable brand has featured for 100 years. When Craftsman went Chinese the quality got worse but it's not like they actually removed parts of the tool.

And of course I run over a nail on the way home. Get off my lawn.

 
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Machines

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Buy cheap tools, get cheap results.
Normally my motto, but with even Craftsman being Chinese now I'd have to step up to a $500 SK set or whatever for a tool I rarely use. This cost me $70 for something they charge $150 for in stores. No complaints until I saw the new version they'd tweaked.
 

oldguy68

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Craftsmen was decent stuff when it was made in the USA.
I bought my brother a full set of Huskey tools when they were made here in America.
None of it was professional quality, but it was quality.

Most people these days don't work on their own stuff anymore.
Cheap Chinese or Taiwanese tools are good enough for small jobs or the occasional user.
Pro's buy quality because they make a living off those tools and cheap tools are rarely good or last with use.

We have lots of great info do to the internet and you can find them easy if you look for value in decent tools.

Times have changed. Heck a yard sale is the best place to buy tools from if the old man was handy with tools.
His kids or grand kids probably wouldn't even have a clue of the quality of what is made today compared to what they are selling for a dollar!
 

drgrant

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Normally my motto, but with even Craftsman being Chinese now I'd have to step up to a $500 SK set or whatever for a tool I rarely use. This cost me $70 for something they charge $150 for in stores. No complaints until I saw the new version they'd tweaked.
I've had very good luck with my Tekton sets.... beat the crap out of them, too.

Most people these days don't work on their own stuff anymore.
I think this is a myth, given that there seem to be more auto part stores showing up everywhere. There are at least 4 auto part stores within like 4 miles of my house and there might
be one I forgot about.... sure a lot of stupid shit can't be touched on new cars, but a lot of people still do some or most of their own hacking. Especially WRT basic stuff like brakes, tire
changing, light bulbs, sometimes alternators, batteries, oxygen sensors, etc.


-Mike
 

mwalsh9152

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I've had very good luck with my Tekton sets.... beat the crap out of them, too.



I think this is a myth, given that there seem to be more auto part stores showing up everywhere. There are at least 4 auto part stores within like 4 miles of my house and there might
be one I forgot about.... sure a lot of stupid shit can't be touched on new cars, but a lot of people still do some or most of their own hacking. Especially WRT basic stuff like brakes, tire
changing, light bulbs, sometimes alternators, batteries, oxygen sensors, etc.


-Mike
I'll second Tekton. Great quality for the price
 

Laderbuilt

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If you want high quality tools but not truck brand prices. Look at industrial tools from
Armstrong. Proto. Wright tool. You can even buy USA made craftsman industrial still however I believe it’s the same as Armstrong.
 

NHKevin

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Hold on a sec, you got a Shipyard in your set?

I just picked up a set a few weeks ago for the impact gun with no beer in it, gawddamn employees probably replaced mine with another socket hoping I'd never be the wiser. I'll be right back, I gotta go burn that joint to the ground. [laugh]
Not any old Shipyard - that's a Quaalude.
 

mwalsh9152

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Who is selling Tekton?
I've bought all of mine on Amazon. You can order direct from Tekton.com, but the prices are a few dollars more than Amazon. If you find the Amazon warehouse deals, it's even better.

The best thing about their socket sets, is there are no skips. 10-24mm will have every socket.
 

NickLeduc

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You would be surprised at how much removing time from manufacturing an object can save over time. Obviously based on production run size. Ive seen jobs measured down to the second. You are looking at it as a tiny cost, and it probably is per piece. They are seeing it as a time perspective. You make 1200 widgets a day. You cut 2 seconds out of a job, they can now make an extra 32 widget that day. Also, they don't give a shit about your knuckles. Not for $70 haha.
 
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You would be surprised at how much removing time from manufacturing an object can save over time. Obviously based on production run size. Ive seen jobs measured down to the second. You are looking at it as a tiny cost, and it probably is per piece. They are seeing it as a time perspective. You make 1200 widgets a day. You cut 2 seconds out of a job, they can now make an extra 32 widget that day. Also, they don't give a shit about your knuckles. Not for $70 haha.
Not to mention the reduction in lost parts due to eliminating a process. When I ran the beam saw in the cabinet factory it was a somewhat regular occurrence to come in and have to re-do the entire previous day's work with fresh material because the night shift spent 8 hours turning all the parts we made in to junk.
 

LuvDog

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I've had very good luck with my Tekton sets.... beat the crap out of them, too.



I think this is a myth, given that there seem to be more auto part stores showing up everywhere. There are at least 4 auto part stores within like 4 miles of my house and there might
be one I forgot about.... sure a lot of stupid shit can't be touched on new cars, but a lot of people still do some or most of their own hacking. Especially WRT basic stuff like brakes, tire
changing, light bulbs, sometimes alternators, batteries, oxygen sensors, etc.


-Mike
There may be a lot of shops, but for the most part, I don't think it's a myth.

When I go in, I see a lot of the real parts being sold to independent mechanics and not normal consumers.

The "normal" people are in there buying washer fluid, maybe air filters, and wash/wax. I think they make almost all their walk-in consumer money on stick on fake vents, colored bulbs, crappy cosmetics and snow brushes. Some people will stop in and have the clerks change their battery and wipers.
But hardly anyone I talk to does any maintenance on their cars.

Your list of basic stuff is way beyond 95% of the people around me.

Whenever I'm in my garage doing brakes, oil, seasonal tire changes, etc, people walking buy are amazed that I can work a jack and own air tools. LOL.
And changing bulbs is a PITA now... to change the DRL on my Chevy truck, I had to take half the front end apart. Who in their right mind designed that?
 

Daddy Mac

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I've started buying Proto from Grainger. Made in the USA and it seems like quality stuff.
 
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And changing bulbs is a PITA now... to change the DRL on my Chevy truck, I had to take half the front end apart. Who in their right mind designed that?
My 2012 Ford F350 Super Duty is no better, To change or replace any of the bulbs in the headlight modules, the grill has to come off and the entire headlight module has to come out.
 

LuvDog

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My 2012 Ford F350 Super Duty is no better, To change or replace any of the bulbs in the headlight modules, the grill has to come off and the entire headlight module has to come out.
yup. The grill needs to come off and the inner wheel well lining has to come down too on some chevy’s. It’s unbelievable to me that they design things this way.
 

pupchow

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Pulling the front fascia off my grand Cherokee was the easiest part of replacing the radiator. The entire assembly just snaps off/on. I probably should've replaced the bulbs while they were so accessible.

FB_IMG_1578079192295.jpg
 

Machines

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As much as I don't really like the car, my '04 Mustang is a breeze to work on. Radiator comes out with a few bolts. Guess driving a car designed in 1978 has its advantages.

For my fellow tool snobs, I made an interesting score. Got a mixed set of Craftsman 3/4" drive stuff for about $37 more than the Husky set originally cost me. Seventeen sockets, extension, breaker bar, ratchet handle. The sockets are Taiwanese (probably Craftsman Canada, not sure) but the tools are USA models.
 
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