Corona Virus Local SITREP Thread

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Shaw's had most everything, but hamburg looked like pink slime and no ribs, and other meat looked unusual or poor quality. No ribs at Fairway beef, either. Bought a big bag of chicken breasts, and wife flew back to return them because they smelled "fishy".
 

Buck F

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Went to Wegmans this morning and there is no more line waiting to get in. A positive. Not so positive is the place was PACKED. Nothing was out of stock though that we were looking for. Plenty of meat, eggs, milk, paper goods, flour and tons of produce. Think the shortages are done.
I went to Wegs in Westwood today, no line, pretty much fully stocked, decent crowd. Left w $75 worth of snacks/gourmet stuff... can’t make a single actual meal from it tho [rofl] [rofl]
 

headednorth

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Market Basket Middleton. Line to TJMax but moved quickly. Seemed extremely well stocked. Eggs, bread, meat, pasta, all stocked up well. Produce was fully stocked imo. Milk and dairy the same. Didnt notice any bare shelves tbh. I did notice pasta sauce and canned tomato products were limited to 2 per customer. I skipped the paper aisle so cant say what tp, paper towels and napkins looked like, same with bleach, bleach wipes, cleaning products.

Line to checkout moved quickly. Got in line outside at 1150 and was on the road heading home at 1250.
 

drgrant

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Anyone else wondering why supermarkets, liquor stores and small hardware stores which are all doing a brisk holiday like volume of business are still operating under reduced hours?

Up here in NH., Hannafords are operating at near normal hours......Guetto Basket has these retarded abrevieted hours

Liquor stores close at 6p

Most local hardware type stores are closing at 5

I'm at a point where I dont even bother trying my local stores anymore because their hours suck so badly......I just make the extra drive to the big box stores

I'd prefer to support my local guy but..........
Lots of these employers have some employees that are "at risk" that they have allowed to abstain from working for awhile
during this, this reduces staffing levels. This means you have less people to put on the floor in a 40 hr work week, so you have to reshape things to
work with what you have. (if you look at Ghetto Basket, there are tiers of middle management that are basically lifers. A lot of their workers are
lifers, too, whereas Hannaford is more like "teenagers and a few moms sprinkled in" ) I bet the median age of the average MB employee is far
higher than Hannafords.


Also 'rona has literally changed the way people shop and entire retail patterns. There's less night stuff now, with most people still hibernating
at home. The little guys aren't seeing late activity, and also they too, face serious staffing problems... it's a balancing
act.
 

drgrant

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I think Market Basket is a little too crowded and high volume and low markup for self-checkout registers. For one thing, the theft level on them goes up exponentially with volume. [thinking] Based on what I see happening at Stop & Shop, it would probably hurt throughput at MB more than help. [hmmm]
I don't think MB would ever have that because it would be a total shit show with the clientele in some of their highest volume stores. Not to mention if you
go into the typical internal customer area structure of most MBs, if you take a look around, there's not a ton of wasted space. It's all occupied by
product. The way the stores are designed, I don't think meshes well with these machines. Also the front end of nearly every MB is a "box" with two sets of
doors at the front sides. A lot of other stores use sort of viaducts to route foot traffic in an out of the store, MB is more like THE STORE IS HERE bam.

Also at an internal culture level, if any store puts in a ton of those things (eg for any other use than like "10 items or less" etc it's basically kind of insulting to your staff (and MB, culturally, is probably bar none the best place to work for someone who has to do that stuff) although one could argue that say, at Wal Mart, that the cashiers (on average) have pretty much earned those machines, Maybe its my imagination but I swear walmart has the SLOWEST cashiers on the planet. Other than them turning into anti gun dbags, that's the primary reason I won't set foot in one anymore if I can avoid it, just checking out with like 3 people in line can feel like you're taking an unwanted trip to the dentist or something.
 

Spanz

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Trouble finding meat for the weekend?
No problem if you live in the EU!!!

1590316612649.png

Yums!!!
"Give me some of those meal worms, and don't get cheap on me!"
 
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Yesterday we drove up I95 through Maine into western Maine, back into NH via route 2 over white mountains, then back I93 through Franconia Notch. There was very little cars on the road or activity anywhere, in both states. NH had the beaches closed signs when approaching the coast. I have no idea about Maine's beaches but the lack of cars on the road suggests people are not headed that way. Most stores closed except the usual suspects.

When we reached the white mountains area, many of the hiking parking lots we passed by were only partially full (and some empty), so it looks like hiking is possible in most places despite it being a beautiful weekend. I suspect the lots for Lafayette are full but they can't be easily seen from the main road... looked like most spots were taken from what I could see. We parked at Echo Lake for a short time... there were a few people around (the lot would normally have been 100% full), and I found it bizarre at least 1/3 of them were actually wearing masks. In the woods. With no people around. There was a family of 4 where even the 2 year old was walking around in a mask. The husband looked like a soy boy. The beach itself had a sign saying "closed", but that didn't stop us or anyone else from going down to it. One family brought a grill. Several were sticking their own kayaks in the lake. It wasn't warm enough for swimming, but no one was stopping anyone.
 

Super99Z

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I can't wait for American liberals to have a mouth full of bugs telling me how enlightened they are and how their guy(gal) is bringing everyone out of poverty.
 

Cowgirlup

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Trouble finding meat for the weekend?
No problem if you live in the EU!!!

View attachment 359642

Yums!!!
"Give me some of those meal worms, and don't get cheap on me!"

We buy those in bulk for the chickens. They are just little dried out exoskeletons. They don't smell bad. Kind of like popcorn or chips. It would take a lot of them to feel like you had a meal.
 

pastera

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My church sent out their plan to reopen - includes a sign in sheet for contact tracing.
Not certain where the requirement is coming from and will push for it to be dropped.
One thing is certain - I'm not going down that path. I don't need ID to vote or buy groceries, not going to comply to an unconstitutional requirement for church.
 

kevin9

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My church sent out their plan to reopen - includes a sign in sheet for contact tracing.
Not certain where the requirement is coming from and will push for it to be dropped.
One thing is certain - I'm not going down that path. I don't need ID to vote or buy groceries, not going to comply to an unconstitutional requirement for church.
Just sign in as M. Luther, D. Bonhoeffer, or Bro. Andrew.
 

Garys

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I went to Microcenter yesterday because I needed a new monitor. That required driving through the PRC.

Just about everyone was wearing masks outdoors. Running, biking, sitting benches, just walking along holding hands. The only people I didn't see wearing masks were the rowers and that might just be because I couldn't see them.

Full Covid 19 retard.

As I walked into the stored there was a guy sitting behind some plexiglass, wearing a mask and gloves. He said he had to spray my hands with disinfectant. I refrained from the obvious computer virus joke. He sprayed I walked by and grabbed some paper towels by the table behind him as he said, "That dries by itself."

I ignored him and went over to the monitor section. I found one that seemed to meet my qualifications, but wanted to ask a few questions. I found one of the floor walkers and asked him about it. I had speak loudly because he wouldn't come closer to eight feet. I finally cornered him like a boss cornering his secretary and asked my question. Turns out, the monitor that I had looked at was the one that best met my requirements.

I tossed one into the cart, picked up a new wireless keyboard and headed for the check out.

As I drove out of town, I noted even more mask moronacy.

I guess everyone in the worlds smartest town believes all that crap.
 

jpk

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I went to Microcenter yesterday because I needed a new monitor. That required driving through the PRC.

Just about everyone was wearing masks outdoors. Running, biking, sitting benches, just walking along holding hands. The only people I didn't see wearing masks were the rowers and that might just be because I couldn't see them.

Full Covid 19 retard.

As I walked into the stored there was a guy sitting behind some plexiglass, wearing a mask and gloves. He said he had to spray my hands with disinfectant. I refrained from the obvious computer virus joke. He sprayed I walked by and grabbed some paper towels by the table behind him as he said, "That dries by itself."

I ignored him and went over to the monitor section. I found one that seemed to meet my qualifications, but wanted to ask a few questions. I found one of the floor walkers and asked him about it. I had speak loudly because he wouldn't come closer to eight feet. I finally cornered him like a boss cornering his secretary and asked my question. Turns out, the monitor that I had looked at was the one that best met my requirements.

I tossed one into the cart, picked up a new wireless keyboard and headed for the check out.

As I drove out of town, I noted even more mask moronacy.

I guess everyone in the worlds smartest town believes all that crap.
Well....next time you encounter one of the morons feel free to share the CDC's most recent stats on fatality rate of Rona.....


  • 0-49 years old: .05%
  • 50-64 years old: .2%
  • 65+ years old: 1.3%
  • Overall ages: .4%
But as the Groksters note....the CDC stats are amongst those that are SYMPTOMATIC.....which is ~65% of all cases....the other 35% are asymptomatic

When you include the asymptomatic numbers the overall fatality rate drops to .26%

By every measure this is seasonal flu folks......

To further support this.....NH STILL hasnt had a fatality in anyone under 60 years of age that DIDNT have some underlying condition

There's ZERO reason to quarantine the healthy.....and by every measure the medical experts protocols for long term care facilities isnt working because we keep seeing outbreaks in these settings.......the old folks arent running out to hooters and bringing it back into the nursing homes.....its flawed protocols that the staff are operating under that is bringing it into facilities and permitting xmission
 
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I've been staying out of this thread because nuanced discussion of the data doesn't seem to be a major hobby here. But @jpk I am inspired to comment on your numbers.

CDC Fatality Rates
These numbers come from an April 29 set of parameters intended to model re-opening planning and are not a careful examination of the pandemic's history. They are, let's say, optimistic and do not match the fatality rates we saw out of countries like Spain. Spain's fatality rates have been between slightly more and triple these (0.5% to 1.5% of symptoms) with 1% about average. Which is what others have estimated for the US, too.

I suspect CDC will be revising somewhat upwards as the CDC unf***s it's counting of active cases vs. recovered cases.

When you include the asymptomatic numbers the overall fatality rate drops to .26%

By every measure this is seasonal flu folks......
Look, let's say the CDC is right. If your total number is correct, that's still really really high for a virulent contagion. That's more than twice as lethal as the seasonal flu. Franky, I hope it is not this lethal. 0.26% is not a good number. It is a bad number.

And we know Covid-19 is considerably more contagious, so there are more total cases. So that number would be another hundred of thousands of deaths.

You can think whatever you want about the wisdom of this whole response but if you're going to pencil out some numbers, it's worth considering if the conclusion actually fits the numbers you produce. Lots of news sources are happy to put some numbers on the page and tell you it means whatever they wanted it to mean to begin with.

Is that worth destroying the US's economy? Maybe not. But it's, jeez, hundreds of thousands of dead Americans that probably wouldn't have died otherwise. Dead Americans in demographics that trend conservative, vote more Republican, that support the second Amendment at a higher rate. If you don't think that's going to have long term effects other than the sheer tragedy of a huge mountain of dead Americans, I don't know what to tell you.


EDIT: Hudson Market Basket has no flour again, but lots of avacados, for a SITREP. So there's there that.
 
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jpk

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I've been staying out of this thread because nuanced discussion of the data doesn't seem to be a major hobby here. But @jpk I am inspired to comment on your numbers.



These numbers come from an April 29 set of parameters intended to model re-opening planning and are not a careful examination of the pandemic's history. They are, let's say, optimistic and do not match the fatality rates we saw out of countries like Spain. Spain's fatality rates have been between slightly more and triple these (0.5% to 1.5% of symptoms) with 1% about average. Which is what others have estimated for the US, too.

I suspect CDC will be revising somewhat upwards as the CDC unf***s it's counting of active cases vs. recovered cases.



Look, let's say the CDC is right. If your total number is correct, that's still really really high for a virulent contagion. That's more than twice as lethal as the seasonal flu. Franky, I hope it is not this lethal. 0.26% is not a good number. It is a bad number.

And we know Covid-19 is considerably more contagious, so there are more total cases. So that number would be another hundred of thousands of deaths.

You can think whatever you want about the wisdom of this whole response but if you're going to pencil out some numbers, it's worth considering if the conclusion actually fits the numbers you produce. Lots of news sources are happy to put some numbers on the page and tell you it means whatever they wanted it to mean to begin with.

Is that worth destroying the US's economy? Maybe not. But it's, jeez, hundreds of thousands of dead Americans that probably wouldn't have died otherwise. Dead Americans in demographics that trend conservative, vote more Republican, that support the second Amendment at a higher rate. If you don't think that's going to have long term effects other than the sheer tragedy of a huge mountain of dead Americans, I don't know what to tell you.


EDIT: Hudson Market Basket has no flour again, but lots of avacados, for a SITREP. So there's there that.
First

We're not spain.....nor are we Italy......both have other factors including a disproportionately older population with underlying issues vs US population

Second of all is that the breakdown by AGE is important

To begin with.....35% of the population right off the bat is asymptomatic.....ie they catch it and move on with life without ever knowing they had it

Further.....If you're under 50 its LESS THAN .05% not even including the fact that 35% are asymptomatic and not included in the .05% calculation

Claiming .26% is a "Bad Numbers" is BULLSCHTEIN

everyone has NORMALIZED seasonal flu fatality rates and never bleat and cry over it.....but yet we're supposed to cower in fear over Covid bullshit?

Brother PLEASE....

Lets look at the previous comparison CDC offered between seasonal flu and covid JUST for seasonal flu numbers



Compare Seasonal Flu on left with latest CDC #'s

By every measure there's ZERO justification for the Karen like response

If seasonal flu in 65+ bracket is .83 and Rona is 1.4 while UNDER 65 is on par......how do you justify locking down an entire population?

YOU CANT

During the 1957 Flu of H2N2 over 116,000 americans died out of a population of 172 million

During the 1968 H3N2 flu (Hong Kong Flu) 100.000 americans died out of a population of 200 million

Get the fook over it....there never WAS a justification for shutdown....and South Korea, Taiwan, Japan, Sweden and others have SHOWN that......and there sure as SHIT isnt a justification for CONTINUED shutdown/restrictions based on current data

The cure is worse than the disease......

My RIGHTS dont end where YOUR FEARS BEGIN

You want to cower at home then have at it......but dont BEGIN to tell the rest of us what we should or shouldnt do
 

Spanz

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We buy those in bulk for the chickens. They are just little dried out exoskeletons. They don't smell bad. Kind of like popcorn or chips. It would take a lot of them to feel like you had a meal.
Annnnnd......you know this how?
 
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Choctaw

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Sure they would have, it’s just a question of when.

What do the numbers look like when you take the nursing home cases out?
Probably the same as Hitler's ovens if you removed all of the Jews (who presumably would have died eventually anyway).

It bothers me when some people write off a whole demographic as expendable. These are real people.
 

Tommy Gun

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So 100,000 in 3 months equals 1 year of flu. Good to know.
I fractured my back so I’ve been out of work for 2 months and I’m lucky to not have to decide to stay home or go to work with a company that was unable to cope with virus.
 

jpk

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Sure they would have, it’s just a question of when.

What do the numbers look like when you take the nursing home cases out?
This

Chocktaws response to this HAS to be the product of an epic day drinking binge.....

UNLESS there were a seasonal component to Rona like there is with seasonal flu.....the Rona would continue to rip thru the population until some sort of herd immunity were reached in the overall population
 

jpk

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So 100,000 in 3 months equals 1 year of flu. Good to know.
I fractured my back so I’ve been out of work for 2 months and I’m lucky to not have to decide to stay home or go to work with a company that was unable to cope with virus.
Might want to revisit your math

First case in the US was early Jan

Furthermore 1957 Flu of H2N2 hit the US end of July, peaked in fall, there was a second wave in the elderly population Jan/Feb and was pretty much over/done in ~9 mos

During the 1968 H3N2 flu (Hong Kong Flu), a vacinne was developed ~4 mos after the flu started

Both of those instances of Flu and resulting fatalities of ~100k plus were in a US population that was ~ half the size of current US population so you would have to DOUBLE the fatality numbers to picture what the sitrep looked like

Hope your back heals fast
 

new guy

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Probably the same as Hitler's ovens if you removed all of the Jews (who presumably would have died eventually anyway).

It bothers me when some people write off a whole demographic as expendable. These are real people.
The point isn’t that they’re expendable, it’s that they’re a known, contained subset of the population that just happens to be wildly susceptible to it relative to the rest of the population. Take them out of the numbers and what do we have left?

There’s no need to even consider whether or not they’re worth sacrificing to save the rest of society (they may well be), you just need to lock them down and leave the rest of us alone.
 
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The point isn’t that they’re expendable, it’s that they’re a known, contained subset of the population that just happens to be wildly susceptible to it relative to the rest of the population. Take them out of the numbers and what do we have left?

There’s no need to even consider whether or not they’re worth sacrificing to save the rest of society (they may well be), you just need to lock them down and leave the rest of us alone.
Since nobody is answering, estimates are about 33%-50% of the deaths nationally are in nursing homes and long term care facilities. In some states it's probably 60%+. On the west coast, it's less, while like states like NY, probably haven't actually reported all the deaths in nursing homes yet.

Other countries that are further along had about 50% of deaths in care facilities.

Nursing homes are getting absolutely crushed but if you thought it was like 80%-90% of deaths, well, it doesn't appear that way. We have somewhere between 50,000 to 70,000 dead Americans who were not in care facilities.

You can make your own policy judgement on this, in terms of if a lockdown is a good idea. But we're all numerate here, I'd bet. Might as well put a number on it instead of just hand-waving.
 
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SpaceCritter

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Since nobody is answering, estimates are about 33%-50% of the deaths nationally are in nursing homes and long term care facilities. In some states it's probably 60%+. On the west coast, it's less, while like states like NY, probably haven't actually reported all the deaths in nursing homes yet.

Other countries that are further along had about 50% of deaths in care facilities.

Nursing homes are getting absolutely crushed but if you thought it was like 80%-90% of deaths, well, it doesn't appear that way. We have somewhere between 50,000 to 70,000 dead Americans who were not in care facilities.

You can make your own policy judgement on this, in terms of if a lockdown is a good idea. But we're all numerate here, I'd bet.
We're still not anywhere close to a population-adjusted death rate versus the 1957 Asian Flu that nobody remembers. We're probably going to get up to the 1968 Hong Kong Flu numbers (that, likewise, nobody remembers). The ONLY reason anyone will remember this one is because of the clownshow reaction that will ultimately result in at least as many deaths due to "collateral damage" ("deaths of despair" or delayed medical procedures or ...) as the virus.
 

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EDIT: Hudson Market Basket has no flour again, but lots of avacados, for a SITREP. So there's there that.
Can someone explain this flour (and yeast), shortage to me?
Are there that many people out there making their own bread?
Even during the height of the panic, there was bread still to be found on the shelves (at least at my local supermarkets).
Last time I had home made bread was when I was a kid, and quite honestly it sucked.
Plus, it must be an unnecessary PITA to make.
And there's no way it can beat fresh Italian bread baked in a real oven.
 

SpaceCritter

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Can someone explain this flour (and yeast), shortage to me?
Are there that many people out there making their own bread?
Even during the height of the panic, there was bread still to be found on the shelves (at least at my local supermarkets).
Last time I had home made bread was when I was a kid, and quite honestly it sucked.
Plus, it must be an unnecessary PITA to make.
And there's no way it can beat fresh Italian bread baked in a real oven.
MY bread is AWWWWWWsome!!1!



This be it.

Sadly, I'm allergic to wheat, so I can make it but cannot eat a bite. [sad]
 
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