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College sports recruiting for HS student

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Stryker, Aug 14, 2019 at 3:33 PM.

  1. Stryker

    Stryker NES Member

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    Hi All,

    Thought I would hit up the brain trust on NES as this is probably the largest (and best) source of information I have at my fingertips.

    My daughter will be starting the 11th grade later this month and has excelled at running during High School - so much so that I think we should be talking to college recruiters as I think she has a good shot at an athletic scholarship.

    Any feedback from anyone who has had their kid recruited for college sports?

    How to kick off the process ? What to do, what not to do?

    Anyone with experience related specifically to running?

    Thanks in advance for the info!
     

  2. chrbla2000

    chrbla2000 NES Member

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    What type of running? Track or Cross Country? My son runs track and was recruited to a Div 1 school, he starts later this month. For us, the process was fairly simple really, college coaches and scouts were at the large meets and left us business cards to get in touch with them. I think they're not allowed to talk to the kids until they're juniors if I recall correctly. But anyway, I digress..

    We signed our son up for this website in 10th grade, it allows kids to build a profile, post grades and athletic achievements, search schools, etc. Also allows coaches to reach out to kids and start the conversation:
    NCSA – Get Recruited. Play Sports in College | NCSASports.org

    It was pricey, but, I think worth it to get some extra exposure. I say that, but we didn't end up using the service to connect our kid with the colleges, it sort of happened organically. It is a good tool though and worth checking out, we know people who had great success with it connecting their children to schools and coaches. I'll take a second to brag, I think our situation was a little different because my son made to Nationals and is ranked 24th in the country for his sprinting event, so he's gotten quite a lot of exposure.

    Kids being courted by Div 1 and 2 schools are allowed only 5 "official" visits per NCAA rules. So what we did was help our son get a list of schools he would be interested in attending that had the major he wanted (sports medicine) and were either Div 1 or Div 2. Next we made lots of ''unofficial' visits to all of these schools, we emailed the coaches and tried to setup a quick meet and greet during the unofficial visits. Our son narrowed it down to 3 schools and went on 'official' visits to all 3 before committing.

    FYI, an 'official' visit is one where the school formally invites your kid out, usually for an overnight, sometimes 2 nights, pairs him or her up with a member of the team and has them shadow that student for the time there're there. I don't think they can actually practice with the team, but they can observe a practice.

    Hope you find that somewhat helpful, I'll answer any questions that I can if you have some specifics.

    Thanks,

    -chris
     
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  3. BlacknRed

    BlacknRed NES Member

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    Great story for your son chrbla2000. 24th Nationally is a very high honor!

    I feel your first step will to be to have a real frank talk with her coaches. They will have had experience in this endeavor. If they are honest about the level required to get a scholarship, that is a good step. Scouts and coaches will find you.

    There is a lot of potential money for merit based scholarships as well. Using the track thing along with academics to get money from D3 schools is a lot less pressure. You may find that your D1 scholarship is only $100 or they get injured or lose interest. There goes that scholarship. They also own your azz. Friend's daughter went to Brown on a track scholarship and it was the a huge over arching part of her college years. Few people come out employed with track as their major college time expenditure.
     
  4. Fixxah

    Fixxah NES Member

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    I would think they have already been made aware of her ability.
     
  5. REM870

    REM870

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    Careful with the clearing house recruiting programs. Some are nothing more than money grabs.
    Depending on sport there are limitations on when the coach of record can speak with a prospect and how many times.
    The student athlete has to be there best recurring pr firm.
    What other things outside track are they doing? Clubs other sports. GRADES
    Make the list of schools D1-D3 that have the program you want sports are second what field of studies are you looking to pursue a career in.
    The difference in D1-D3 is huge. Program funding and notoriety. But at the end of the day who has the best degree program get interest from school c and use it to sell yourself at school a without naming the school.
    When talking to the coach ask how many they carry on the roster for your event. Not many teams need 5 punters or seven left handed short stops.

    At the end of this before you sign a commitment letter think. If you could never compete again (injury) is this the best place for me. Am I getting the degree I want for a solid career in the marketplace.
     
  6. Broccoli Iglesias

    Broccoli Iglesias NES Member

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    This might be true. But I am a believer in being proactive and not in hoping someone will find her.
     
  7. chrbla2000

    chrbla2000 NES Member

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    Thanks! I'm incredibly proud of him!!

    Just FYI, D3 schools do not have any scholarship money for sports, only academics. My son is in the National Honor Society, graduated HS with a weighted 3.7 GPA, and got *zero* academic scholarship dollars.

    -chris
     
  8. crazymjb

    crazymjb

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    For those who don't qualify for academic/athletic scholarships, MA Guard will cover tuition and fees at any state school. There are also some nice deals through ROTC among a couple other programs. Just saying. *currently in recruiting
     
  9. SeanT

    SeanT NES Member

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    This is true, but D3 schools can expedite the processing for any potential academic scholarships for potential athletes. Speaking as someone observing the process from the outside (knowing a D3 coach), ensuring your kid’s results are posted somewhere findable is a big key. I know at least for a different sport, the college coaches will look at an athlete’s performance/results/location to factor in if they might be worth reaching out to. Make sure the high school is getting that info into the right databases.
     
  10. Rob Boudrie

    Rob Boudrie NES Member

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    No doubt your kid was not demographically desirable.
     
  11. fencer

    fencer NES Member

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    What is the likelihood that they will be deployed? Isn't it pretty much a given that you will get to enjoy a tour in Shitholeastan? Or some other location that requires sun block 88 and lots of Kevlar?
     
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  12. MarlboroughMan

    MarlboroughMan NES Member

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    My two sons played sports in college (football 1AA and baseball D3). One thing I learned early on in the process was that coaches will say anything to promise your kid the world and to make him/her feel that he's the greatest thing to walk through that door, but unless it's in writing it doesn't mean sh*t (for example, a friend of one of my sons was an outstanding high school football player, the head coach of a renowned D1 program promised verbally) that he'd get to compete for a starting spot on their roster and advised him to show up as a walk on. But there was a coaching change before the season and the new coach made it clear to him that he had no interest (this kid ended up at a great D2 school and had an outstanding career, eventually winning the Agganis award as the best Senior College football player in New England, and of course he graduated with a terrific degree). My own sons were made promises too... things worked out well for them, but not exactly as promised.

    My oldest son was a pitcher with a high 80's fastball and was shown a lot of interest out of high school. A D3 state school seemed like a good fit for him academically and athletically, and the coach made it clear that he'd be a key player (as their #1 or #2 starter) in their rotation. When he showed up for day 1 of tryouts there were something like 80 kids and a lot of other pitchers (competing for not a lot of spots since many of the kids were returning players already on the team). My son was amazed at kids who he knew from high school (who were all stand-out players on their various teams) who were cut from those tryouts... all of them seemed stunned and commented that the coach assured them that the tryout was just a formality). I knew one of the kids who was from my son's high school and I was amazed that he didn't make the team. My son was fortunate that he did end up having a great experience with the team and was in fact a starting pitcher in their rotation.

    My younger son dreamed of playing D1 football. His high school program wasn't producing D1 athletes and although he had a very good high school career he wasn't being recruited by D1 schools. He had tough decisions to make between football and lacrosse, where he had some great visits, but he wasn't being offered scholarship opportunities. He decided to go to a D1AA school as a "Preferred Walk-on" where he was enamored by the crowd/facilities, etc., and he was promised a roster spot and advised that he'd be worked into the lineup. His experience also ended up being great in terms of being part of the team/program... but he was red-shirted as a freshman and he never saw the field for game-time, which was frustrating for him as he was on the first scout team and was consistently (according to him and according to what I saw on live scrimmages and film) beating the scholared athletes who had starting roles. He weighed transferring so that he could get on the field, but ultimately stuck it out and then left football for his senior year to focus on academics and finish school (there are a lot of rules about transferring that can make playing time prohibitive, etc.) and he also ended up with a good degree and a great experience. But he also experienced a whole lot of promises from coaches in that program that never panned out.

    At every level (D3 through D1) the competition is fierce and the coaches are playing for keeps. They will tell kids whatever they want to hear in order to acheive the roster that they believe gives them the best pool of talent to win (including the option to dispose of kids who committed to the school but who they ultimately don't see as a roster fit for whatever reason they have). It's a hell of a great experience for a kid to play any level of college sports... but unless they show you the money (scholarship) or put something in writing, coaches promises during recruiting should be viewed as just hot air.
     
  13. Broccoli Iglesias

    Broccoli Iglesias NES Member

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    Even the guard?
     
  14. crazymjb

    crazymjb

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    Depends on a lot on the job and/or unit. There is a good likelihood in many fields of getting deployed SOMEWHERE during the course of an enlistment. Combat deployments are less and less common as the wars diminish in scale, but certain units still do get them. If another major conflict pops off... who knows. If you do what is known as the simultaneous membership program you are non deployable while in ROTC, but still qualify for the tuition and fee waivers you get with guard duty before any additional ROTC scholarships. You do have an obligation after commissioning of course.
     
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  15. fencer

    fencer NES Member

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    Unless it's the Coast Guard. Although, I know a kid that went Coast Guard reserves, and I am pretty sure he went to Kuwait or someplace like that for his two weeks. I believe they called his MOS Port Security and it was basically trained as an infantry unit. I know his unit trained with Marines.
    But I have no idea what type of education benefits they offer.

    These days the Guard and Reserves are no joke. Their training is legit and they are often called upon.
     

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