Businesses that went bankrupt during Coronavirus pandemic

richc

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We've been talking about the downfall of Hertz for a month already, there's an entire thread about it here:

Yeah, I'm aware. Fully aware.

This is a thread about companies that have filed for bankruptcy. Last night Hertz filed for bankruptcy.

Is the relevance that hard to see? Or maybe you just need a hug, @Zappa.

And, before you ask, that's not an offer at all...
 
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Zappa

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Yeah, I'm aware. Fully aware.

This is a thread about companies that have filed for bankruptcy. Last night Hertz filed for bankruptcy.

Is the relevance that hard to see? Or maybe you just need a hug, @Zappa.

And, before you ask, that's not an offer at all...
I read about it at Jalopnik, I was going to post it over in the Hertz thread, but saw you posted it here first.
I didn't repost it over there to give you the opportunity to do so, because you were first to break the news and I didn't want to dupe you.
 

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If my employer decides after this mess to let me work from home either permanently - or at the very least for the majority of my work days, I will gladly eat the electricity expense. I had been contemplating buying a new car or a decent used one that I could just wrack mileage up on. My car has been sitting in the driveway for the last year because it has issues and I just haven't had the time to fix it ( I have an 18 month at home now who sucks up the majority of my free time - and then some). So I drive the truck to work. That puts a lot of mileage on the truck - and eats a lot of gas. Not having to go into work say 4 days out of 5 - would mean a HUGE drop in my commute expenses - and would probably mean I can just make the vehicles I have now last for a decade or more (if the job lasts that long). Plus I'd get back and hour and a half out of my day that was pure wasted time before (driving down the highway).

With an extra hour and a half a day I can get a huge amount of work done around the house - which means I don't have to pay somebody else to do it.

Another expense saved.
Actually, you bring to mind an interesting topic, which I'm sure has been discussed elsewhere, but I haven't bothered to look for it. If the whole WFH trend really takes hold and continues long after the pandemic goes quiet, we could see some wage corrections/adjustments across the country.

Having worked in the compensation field for my entire career (but retired a long, long time ago), you see that there are great geographical differences in salaries, driven in large part by cost of living and availability of other qualified applicants (supply and demand). But if you can now hire someone for your Boston or NYC firm (for example), who can easily be doing the vast majority of his work from his home in a trailer park in Alabama, those cost of living and supply & demand factors become non-factors, to great extent. Hell, for that matter, depending on the job, you could much more easily be outsourcing many WFH jobs overseas...which I'm sure would appeal to many cost-conscious companies.


Frank
 

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Actually, you bring to mind an interesting topic, which I'm sure has been discussed elsewhere, but I haven't bothered to look for it. If the whole WFH trend really takes hold and continues long after the pandemic goes quiet, we could see some wage corrections/adjustments across the country.

Having worked in the compensation field for my entire career (but retired a long, long time ago), you see that there are great geographical differences in salaries, driven in large part by cost of living and availability of other qualified applicants (supply and demand). But if you can now hire someone for your Boston or NYC firm (for example), who can easily be doing the vast majority of his work from his home in a trailer park in Alabama, those cost of living and supply & demand factors become non-factors, to great extent. Hell, for that matter, depending on the job, you could much more easily be outsourcing many WFH jobs overseas...which I'm sure would appeal to many cost-conscious companies.


Frank
That's been happening in some industries for years now - VFX is almost exclusively Indian now.
 

richc

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Personally I can't see the whole WFH concept becoming the norm.

As a small business owner I know for certain there are people who work as hard or harder from home. I also know there are people who are not disciplined enough to do so. And for some their home living situation is just not conducive to working at home.

I'm a small business owner in the tech field. When we hire someone new there's a big learning curve. The new hires truly believe they know it all but are quickly disavowed of that notion. We tend to take on very difficult projects like nothing they've ever seen before. Or in their prior experience they worked on a single system for years and that was their view of the universe.

When we're all in the office there's a collegiate environment where people who are new get help from the more experienced. And if a more experienced person needs a second opinion they're surrounded by a group of other folks who can jump in with their own experiences and insights. The sum of the parts is greater than the whole.

I can't afford to lose that synergy. That's what allows us to build complex systems with consistent success. How we keep customers for many years and in some cases decades.

I know my views are contrary to many others. But personal interaction among our team is part of our success. And, no, I don't think we get nearly the same interaction over Zoom or others.

:)

Rich
 
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Personally I can't see the whole WFH concept becoming the norm.

As a small business owner I know for certain there are people who work as hard or harder from home. I also know there are people who are not disciplined enough to do so. And for some their home living situation is just not conducive to working at home.

I'm a small business owner in the tech field. When we hire someone new there's a big learning curve. The new hires truly believe they know it all but are quickly disavowed of that notion. We tend to take on very difficult projects like nothing they've ever seen before. Or in their prior experience they worked on a single system for years and that was their view of the universe.

When we're all in the office there's a collegiate environment where people who are new get help from the more experienced. And if a more experienced person needs a second opinion they're surrounded by a group of other folks who can jump in with their own experiences and insights. The sum of the parts is greater than the whole.

I can't afford to lose that synergy. That's what allows us to build complex systems with consistent success. How we keep customers for many years and in some cases decades.
I know my views are contrary to many others. But personal interaction among our team is part of our success. And, no, I don't think we get nearly the same interaction over Zoom or others.

:)

Rich

I think it depends on the field. I work in I.T. and I see very much that WFH will be a large part of the future in our field. Job seekers will expect it, seek it out, etc. Our own internal studies have found that the majority of our highly skilled highly salaried IT professionals are more productive when WFH... They turn around app development projects quicker and they write higher quality code. There's a lot of distractions in an office environment they don't have to contend with at home. They also log in more hours. In the office when 5:00 hits, they're out the door. But when WFH, they're more inclined to work an extra 30 minutes to finish that complex function or stored procedure they're writing and get it checked into source control before they call it quits.

Don't be so quick to dismiss it. A lot of white-collar organizations are getting a good look at it right now and liking what they're seeing. It attracts employees, they produce higher quality work, they work more hours, their job satisfaction is higher, and it reduces operating expenses for the office as you can have a smaller space. It gets commuters off the roads which EVERYONE likes! Employees - especially those with long commutes - get more time in their day.

It's not the future for every industry. But it is the future for many... It has huge benefits for both employer and employee. Those who refuse to acknowledge that are going to see their best talent leave their organization for one that has it.

Like anything some will abuse and take for granted. But overall - this is going to very much be a part of the American workforce's future.
 

Boris

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I think it depends on the field. I work in I.T. and I see very much that WFH will be a large part of the future in our field. Job seekers will expect it, seek it out, etc. Our own internal studies have found that the majority of our highly skilled highly salaried IT professionals are more productive when WFH... They turn around app development projects quicker and they write higher quality code. There's a lot of distractions in an office environment they don't have to contend with at home. They also log in more hours. In the office when 5:00 hits, they're out the door. But when WFH, they're more inclined to work an extra 30 minutes to finish that complex function or stored procedure they're writing and get it checked into source control before they call it quits.

Don't be so quick to dismiss it. A lot of white-collar organizations are getting a good look at it right now and liking what they're seeing. It attracts employees, they produce higher quality work, they work more hours, their job satisfaction is higher, and it reduces operating expenses for the office as you can have a smaller space. It gets commuters off the roads which EVERYONE likes! Employees - especially those with long commutes - get more time in their day.

It's not the future for every industry. But it is the future for many... It has huge benefits for both employer and employee. Those who refuse to acknowledge that are going to see their best talent leave their organization for one that has it.

Like anything some will abuse and take for granted. But overall - this is going to very much be a part of the American workforce's future.
both you and Rich bring excellent points that are not mutually exclusive. A lot depends on work, type of work and people.

one reason I hate working from home is because work never stops, there is no cutoff. I worked for few remote companies early in my career and found that work merged into my life 24/7, especially when tasks take long time to run tests or datamine. There is always the temptation of use weekends and nights to do more and with experience you learn to balance it. For the wast majority of Americans who were forced into this type of work it's not going to be a good or productive experience.

One funny story, from the early days, this is from over 20 years ago. One Canadian/Russian programmer created an office robot to drive around in office while working remotely. The reason is that most interesting/important conversations were taking place around watercoolers and not in meetings rooms. I can attest that in some companies this is 100% true.
 
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dlarge

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I think what he means is it’s not the same, eg if you’re not around a lot you end up valuing the time with family/pets more. It’s a sort of complacency. There’s nothing malicious about it, it just is. It’s part of the human condition. Who misses his doge more, the dude that knows the doge is 10 feet from him at all times or the guy that goes on business trips and is away from the animal for a week....

Same thing even goes for kids. You know how many people are going to dump their kids off at inlaws for a week or two when this shits over? Same idea. Although pets are easier than snotgobblers.
This is exactly it. I'm surprised my statement could be taken any other way.

ETA: I wouldn't feel sorry for my dogs. They love having me around 24/7.
 
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You are going to see tons of restaurants fold. Most people don't realize how thin a margin they run on.
With restaurants going under, and no new ones opening to replace them, what's the chances their non-built-in equipment sells at auction or cheaply? Are there firms which specialize in reclaimed restaurant and bar equipment?
 

richc

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You are going to see tons of restaurants fold. Most people don't realize how thin a margin they run on. They literally make it on volume alone. 60 percent of them close within the first year. 95% close within 3 years of opening.
I just left Harkey's Liquors in Millis, MA. I chatted with Bob Harkey.

Bob is a well known wine expert. He teaches wine topics at culinary schools and gives seminars. The guy knows his stuff and is well connected to the food and beverage world.

His business is through the roof. Best it has ever been he said. Because people are not able to dine out and so buy liquor to drink in the house.

He was chatting with a big restaurant owner he's friendly with. This fell was saying he expects 2/3's to 3/4's of food establishments to close over the next year to 18 months. That's higher than the often quoted stat of 1/2. This fella said most restaurants will lose money with social distancing requirements with fewer tables and chairs. It's not worth them opening.

This whole mess has turned so many industries upside down.
 

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I agree that it depends on what the work entails.

I spent 12 yrs doing product safety reviews of computer equipment for DEC. To actually review the hardware (which varied from a mouse to a huge 400# line printer) I needed to be in the office or lab. To write the reports for manufacturing/UL/CSA/TUEV, I could more do that anywhere. I did some work for home but always after-hours. I bought the computer that I used and DEC only paid for the dedicated landline I used for modem access. During a crisis that occurred, I was at home sending Emails at 3:30 AM, the next day my VP's secretary asked me was I really up that late doing it . . . yup.

On the other hand my Wife was forced to retire from Partners Healthcare since her new upper-level manager didn't like the idea of anyone working at home. She reviewed medical research studies for BWH & MGH and when they built the Somerville building they gave everyone laptops and allowed them to work from home 1-3 days/week (all their work was done via computer). Since we were moving to NH, she requested to work full-time from home (her direct supervisor supported the request) but was denied, so they lost a 22 yr senior employee. And then they shut down the entire building due to Covid and made everyone work from home some 6 weeks after she retired. The irony!
 

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With restaurants going under, and no new ones opening to replace them, what's the chances their non-built-in equipment sells at auction or cheaply? Are there firms which specialize in reclaimed restaurant and bar equipment?
Yep. There is one in boston. Sells whole bars and restaurants at auction. Read the sunday boston herald if u are intetested.

In fact there are soooo many auctions, i always thought you had to have a screw loose to spend so much opening a restaurant with all new fear
 

Spanz

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As far as WFH.
Some can do it well.
Some can not.
Since you are forced ( economically as well as government) to have a diverse workforce, by definition you will have a large % of workers who are unable to work from home
 
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Personally I can't see the whole WFH concept becoming the norm.

As a small business owner I know for certain there are people who work as hard or harder from home. I also know there are people who are not disciplined enough to do so. And for some their home living situation is just not conducive to working at home.

I'm a small business owner in the tech field. When we hire someone new there's a big learning curve. The new hires truly believe they know it all but are quickly disavowed of that notion. We tend to take on very difficult projects like nothing they've ever seen before. Or in their prior experience they worked on a single system for years and that was their view of the universe.

When we're all in the office there's a collegiate environment where people who are new get help from the more experienced. And if a more experienced person needs a second opinion they're surrounded by a group of other folks who can jump in with their own experiences and insights. The sum of the parts is greater than the whole.

I can't afford to lose that synergy. That's what allows us to build complex systems with consistent success. How we keep customers for many years and in some cases decades.

I know my views are contrary to many others. But personal interaction among our team is part of our success. And, no, I don't think we get nearly the same interaction over Zoom or others.

:)

Rich
Some of it is about tooling. If employers can prove work trivially, wfh is a non issue. If employers have no way of proving work, it gets more wiggly.

Wfh and unlimited PTO plus epic accountability are perfection for me. Any WFO and PTO logging with shit level accountability always seems to suck donky Kong's dewflaps.
 

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Personally I can't see the whole WFH concept becoming the norm.

As a small business owner I know for certain there are people who work as hard or harder from home. I also know there are people who are not disciplined enough to do so. And for some their home living situation is just not conducive to working at home.

I'm a small business owner in the tech field. When we hire someone new there's a big learning curve. The new hires truly believe they know it all but are quickly disavowed of that notion. We tend to take on very difficult projects like nothing they've ever seen before. Or in their prior experience they worked on a single system for years and that was their view of the universe.

When we're all in the office there's a collegiate environment where people who are new get help from the more experienced. And if a more experienced person needs a second opinion they're surrounded by a group of other folks who can jump in with their own experiences and insights. The sum of the parts is greater than the whole.

I can't afford to lose that synergy. That's what allows us to build complex systems with consistent success. How we keep customers for many years and in some cases decades.

I know my views are contrary to many others. But personal interaction among our team is part of our success. And, no, I don't think we get nearly the same interaction over Zoom or others.

:)

Rich
I think WFH is a lot worse for new hires/younger engineers in my company. If we can't bring them on and supervise them in person we are more likely to hire and experienced person.

If you have to train them a bit on how to do professional support calls, write emails, or strategically handle customers that is a bit more complex remotely. (Things possibly happening with new hires in their first year) Doing drop in checks on how they are progressing or working through problems on a whiteboard just are not natural remotely compared to in a common office. Scheduling a call or meeting is just not casual.

It may be something that will evolve out of necessity but in the interim I see some difficulty spinning up new young engineers who can't as easily be trusted to deliver well in isolation.
 

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This is an ethical conundrum: On the one hand, less people being killed in car accidents, but then less organs for transplant to people who need them. And
less business for the hospitals.

Maybe call it even-steven?
 

calsdad

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With restaurants going under, and no new ones opening to replace them, what's the chances their non-built-in equipment sells at auction or cheaply? Are there firms which specialize in reclaimed restaurant and bar equipment?
The answer to your question is: Yes.

There's all sorts of auction houses out there - some of them specialize in certain industries - others cover a range of industries and/or market spaces.

If you're looking to buy nice stainless steel worktables and cleanup sinks to populate your shop - my guess is that we're coming up on a REALLY good time to buy stuff like that. With so many places going out of business - I'd be willing to bet the prices stuff goes for on auction will be dirt cheap.

I've bought stuff from auction houses a number of times over the years. In fact I just bought a Miller TIG welder and practically brand new flammables cabinet from an "energy company" out in Colorado a couple of weeks ago. The stuff just arrived on Thursday. It was a pain to get them shipped out here - mostly because the onsite people were pretty unhelpful, but in the end it worked out and I got the welder for about $500-600 cheaper than what they typically go for used, and I got the cabinet for about 1/4 of what they go for new. The shipper dented the cabinet - but nothing that affects it's function.

A few weeks before that - I bought another welder from an auction in Texas. That one was an OK deal - probably about $500 cheaper than I typically see them go for used.

I've got a nice mitering band saw coming next week - brand new and for 2/5 the price of new.

Not sure where you'd go to look for restaurant equipment - but www.bidspotter.com is one place to start with. They do all sorts of stuff - and I know I've seen restaurant equipment up there before.
 
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I drive a Box Truck with automobile parts. I have been working non stop as it is considered an essential business.
I drive 7 different routes on a rotating basis. One route takes me to Wilmington, MA. When I was driving by all the gleaming office buildings on Route 128 I was thinking there will be lots of pain in the commercial real estate market because people will get used to WFH. It used to take me 30 minutes to go 5 miles from the Natick plaza to 128, now it takes 5 minutes. People in a certain economic strata will not put up with long commutes or being jammed like sardines with the unwashed on public transportation. WFH will be the new standard, except for new employees, occasional meetings, and other things, due to Mayor Walsh dragging his feet, and buildings being at 25% capacity.
I feel NYC and Boston will return to the 1970s where only very rich and poor living in slums will be the future of cities. People will flee to the suburbs, or NH or the Cape.
 
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Not sure where you'd go to look for restaurant equipment - but www.bidspotter.com is one place to start with. They do all sorts of stuff - and I know I've seen restaurant equipment up there before.
Thanks. I've bought IT and and industrial stuff at auction before, but usually restaurant type stuff was rare and went for a premium (tech firms love their glass-fronted beverage fridges and tavern hardware)
Yep. There is one in boston. Sells whole bars and restaurants at auction. Read the sunday boston herald if u are intetested. In fact there are soooo many auctions, i always thought you had to have a screw loose to spend so much opening a restaurant with all new fear
Cool -- I'd hoped there'd be someplace around specializing in food service type stuff.
 

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I heard Haverhill Steel is all done, although I'm not sure if that's COVID-19 related.
I'm hearing rumors about many North Shore Restaurants that might not make it.
I've been an Agawam Diner patron for about 50 years now and a regular for almost 40 years.
I still get breakfast there every morning, I just text it in to one of the owners.
They've stayed open for take out 6:00 AM to 2:00 PM doing marginal business.
It's just the two owners and an occasional one or two people.
Pre-Covid a Friday night would have 8 people working.
They did their first full day Friday, open till 8:00. I'll think they'll do it again next Friday.
I must've gained 20lbs eating dinner across the street at McDonald's these last 2 months.
My buddy and I met up Friday about 6:30. He had a little table with a welding blanket table cloth.
We set up in a nice spot out back next to the dumpster. I brought a metal chair, my dog & a gas mask.
I insisted on real plates and silverware. I had fried Haddock, Green Beans, Banana Creme and a Frappe.
The waitresses were coming out and taking pictures, I couldn't eat with the gas mask on.

1590278230584.png

1590278331963.png
 

calsdad

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I heard Haverhill Steel is all done, although I'm not sure if that's COVID-19 related.
I'm hearing rumors about many North Shore Restaurants that might not make it.
I've been an Agawam Diner patron for about 50 years now and a regular for almost 40 years.
I still get breakfast there every morning, I just text it in to one of the owners.
They've stayed open for take out 6:00 AM to 2:00 PM doing marginal business.
It's just the two owners and an occasional one or two people.
Pre-Covid a Friday night would have 8 people working.
They did their first full day Friday, open till 8:00. I'll think they'll do it again next Friday.
I must've gained 20lbs eating dinner across the street at McDonald's these last 2 months.
My buddy and I met up Friday about 6:30. He had a little table with a welding blanket table cloth.
We set up in a nice spot out back next to the dumpster. I brought a metal chair, my dog & a gas mask.
I insisted on real plates and silverware. I had fried Haddock, Green Beans, Banana Creme and a Frappe.
The waitresses were coming out and taking pictures, I couldn't eat with the gas mask on.

View attachment 359591

View attachment 359592

I'm curious why Haverhill Steel is all done. There's not that many metals suppliers in this are , but then again there probably aren't that many businesses using metal much either. It's all Biotech and other "high tech" type stuff. I never used Haverhill Steel - been using Cohen up in New Hampshire.
 

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I'm curious why Haverhill Steel is all done. There's not that many metals suppliers in this are , but then again there probably aren't that many businesses using metal much either. It's all Biotech and other "high tech" type stuff. I never used Haverhill Steel - been using Cohen up in New Hampshire.
Per a friend of mine that formerly worked in the steel business, a lot of Canadian companies were undercutting the local steel suppliers on the large jobs.
 

calsdad

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Per a friend of mine that formerly worked in the steel business, a lot of Canadian companies were undercutting the local steel suppliers on the large jobs.
That makes sense. When I buy steel - it most often seems like it's stamped that it was made in Canada. That sort of surprises me - because I would expect China.

In either case - the US steel industry seems to be nowhere to be found. Yet another reason why I support Trump's effort to bring jobs back to the US.

I can see how Canadian steel companies could just undercut local suppliers: They're sending trucks down here anyway to fill orders to the suppliers - if there's nothing stopping them from selling direct to the final consumer - then they'd be making out to just send trucks directly to big jobs instead of the middle-man suppliers like Haverhill Steel.
 

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I was on my way home to start my long weekend (Lol), and I noticed the lights were on in the prep area of the Diner. I spun around, no cars in the parking lot, I figured I'd better try the door, unlocked. I'm calling one of the owners with one hand and my G21 in the other. I tell her what's going on and ask her if she wants me to clear the place. She says no but to check the windows, they were open. Usually she closes and her sister opens, she's not used to closing. She thanked me and I said it's going to cost you, a piece of Chocolate Creme. So I lock up and I'm headed to my truck that's running and the door is open and a Statie drives by giving a funny look. I just waved, thinking what I'm going to tell him if he turns around. Yes Officer. I broke into the Diner to steal a piece of Chocolate Creme Pie, locked the windows, turned off the lights and locked the door on my way out. Now I'm sitting in the 24 Hour Cumbies parking lot in Ipswich. I wanted a Red Flavor Gatorade but they're closed until further notice. COVID-19 Strikes again.
 

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Actually, you bring to mind an interesting topic, which I'm sure has been discussed elsewhere, but I haven't bothered to look for it. If the whole WFH trend really takes hold and continues long after the pandemic goes quiet, we could see some wage corrections/adjustments across the country.

Having worked in the compensation field for my entire career (but retired a long, long time ago), you see that there are great geographical differences in salaries, driven in large part by cost of living and availability of other qualified applicants (supply and demand). But if you can now hire someone for your Boston or NYC firm (for example), who can easily be doing the vast majority of his work from his home in a trailer park in Alabama, those cost of living and supply & demand factors become non-factors, to great extent. Hell, for that matter, depending on the job, you could much more easily be outsourcing many WFH jobs overseas...which I'm sure would appeal to many cost-conscious companies.


Frank
Sort of like what EBay did to a lot of collectibles. Suddenly the prices flattened. Everyone knows what X is worth and the will only pay that.
 
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Actually, you bring to mind an interesting topic, which I'm sure has been discussed elsewhere, but I haven't bothered to look for it. If the whole WFH trend really takes hold and continues long after the pandemic goes quiet, we could see some wage corrections/adjustments across the country.

Having worked in the compensation field for my entire career (but retired a long, long time ago), you see that there are great geographical differences in salaries, driven in large part by cost of living and availability of other qualified applicants (supply and demand). But if you can now hire someone for your Boston or NYC firm (for example), who can easily be doing the vast majority of his work from his home in a trailer park in Alabama, those cost of living and supply & demand factors become non-factors, to great extent. Hell, for that matter, depending on the job, you could much more easily be outsourcing many WFH jobs overseas...which I'm sure would appeal to many cost-conscious companies.


Frank
That wont happen. Companies that didnt mind having people remote were already doing that with jobs such as software engineers.

The ones that wanted to outsource were already outsourcing.

I dont think we will see a big change.
 

smokey-seven

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This fella said most restaurants will lose money with social distancing requirements with fewer tables and chairs.
Many bars and food service industries would calculate their profit margins on the square footage and total seating capacity, tossing in a % number for full versus partial usage. Well, that model is history with social distancing. I can't wait till this all goes away.

Sort of like what EBay did to a lot of collectibles. Suddenly the prices flattened. Everyone knows what X is worth and the will only pay that.
I've done antiques and collectibles for over 40 years. The Bay killed lots of things and accelerated others. I always love it when I go to price something I just bought and cannot find a comparison, let alone recent sales, on the Bay. A simple example since we are on NES, What are some the highest price Colt made 45 magazines and why? Ebay has little information on the why part. Another simple example on a face to face flea market buy, how can you ID a real Stanley #1 plane. Sure they are listed on the Bay but how can you tell when you are just looking at one?

I used to carry a back seat full of books for ID'ing products, the cell phone and internet killed book sales. <--= :cool: I can internet search on English Hallmarked silver faster on a cell phone than in my library.

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Spanz

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I used to carry a back seat full of books for ID'ing products, the cell phone and internet killed book sales. <--= :cool: I can internet search on English Hallmarked silver faster on a cell phone than in my library.

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I too have libraries of technical and other books i used to rely on. Pretty much useless now...i just google it. One of these days i am throwing all that crap away. Back in the late 70's, my only other option was to hop in a car, and drive down to the MIT library, which i had paid access to. In the 90's, it was CD's full of archived technical journals. Now i never use any of that stuff.

the only danger...google "selectively" saves stuff. So some great article i read 4 months ago....where i need to reference it again, damn if i can not find it at all. even if i know most of the title or author....it just disappears.....

RE antiques...boy have prices dropped. You can get museum quality Antique American furniture at 1/3 the price you had to spend ten years ago.
 
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