Bullet feeder and powder check.

paul73

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How are people checking for powder when using a bullet feeder? using a Dillon 650
i check during batch by weighting the drop every 5-7 loads, as i aim for a stable 0.1gr accuracy on rifle loads. different measures differ differently :) - like my .223 now seems to deviate from 24.2 to 24.5gr, but mostly goes steady at 24.3-24.4gr and that stability is OK for what i expect. 308 measure is more accurate, but, as it drops at 44gr+ - minor deviations there are less impactful.
magnetic powder check cannot tell that diff, so, i stopped using it.
 

ddeck22

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Hornady powder cop. Provides a visual indicator

Double alpha magnetic powder check - provides audible indicator

I also look in each case as i seat the bullet.

Powder incorrectness is the #1 issue i want to avoid so i protect as much as i can against it.
 

pastera

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Powder check die - amazingly accurate for just lining up a washer to an oring
For cases like 9mm, 380, and 45 just looking at the case will tell you
If you check your powder every time you loaf primers, you won't run low enough to effect charge weight (assuming you use a baffle). So then the level is going to be correct or very low if there's a problem in the drop tube
 

Broc

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Powder check die - amazingly accurate for just lining up a washer to an oring
For cases like 9mm, 380, and 45 just looking at the case will tell you
If you check your powder every time you loaf primers, you won't run low enough to effect charge weight (assuming you use a baffle). So then the level is going to be correct or very low if there's a problem in the drop tube
Not sure why rubbing low on powder would be an issue, it is usually right there, in a big glass or plastic container, right upfront of people's faces. LOL

But Dillon does make a low powder alarm for their machine so it is probably fairly common.

As for as powder die check ... I ordered one I have to set up. Until now I have been using my eyes and have a light set up. But I could get distracted and not check so the die will be an additional safety measure. I will still use my eyes.
 

paul73

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As for as powder die check ...
now that i have a 3d printer - one of things in my to-do list are custom caps for the sensor rod to match the openings of the .223, .308 and 6.5cm brass.
as the stock one is too narrow and it would bury into the powder producing inconsistent results.
i did not see a practical need for that sensor, to be honest, as i cannot see any way for a dillon bar measure not to drop powder, as many loads as i did so far - i have never ever saw it NOT to drop. and the deviations of 0.2gr i do get there are not large enough for sensor to catch. it is more like a 0.5gr and above diff thing, i think.
 

pastera

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Check die isn't needed but can make it easier to spot a problem when it does happen.
Linkage wears out, a screw backs off, or what ever decides to screw you at that moment and if you are operating in automatic mode you may miss a half charge since you are looking for powder in a case. With a check die you are looking for alignment of two features so any change should snap you out of the groove.
 

ddeck22

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problem is, If I use a bullet feeder there is no room for a check unless I seat and crimp with same die. Is there any reason to not to seat and crimp with same die just for target and plinking rounds?
I had to make the tradeoff....unless I spring for a six station press...or 10. I find that I'm happier making bullets a little slower if I am more confident in the output. But each person has to make that choice.
 

paul73

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problem is, If I use a bullet feeder there is no room for a check unless I seat and crimp with same die. Is there any reason to not to seat and crimp with same die just for target and plinking rounds?
There may be no need to crimp at all. It depends, of course.
 

NH Phantom

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There may be no need to crimp at all. It depends, of course.
I haven't done reloading since the early 80's with a Rock Chucker Just getting my 650 setup so I guess I'm new at this. Still setting up the reloading room. Guess I'll have to learn what needs crimping and what doesn't
 

RankAmateur

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problem is, If I use a bullet feeder there is no room for a check unless I seat and crimp with same die. Is there any reason to not to seat and crimp with same die just for target and plinking rounds?
Yup, I'm using a combination die for pistol rounds. I don't load my precision rifle rounds on the Dillon.
 

paul73

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I don't load my precision rifle rounds on the Dillon.
on 750 it is a no issue at all. there is nothing it cannot do, it is only a routine that differs. i can run it either as a batch, or can check measure every powder drop, there is nothing much to it, really. seating die is very precise there, as well as a whole platform, i really see no benefit at all to have an alternative setup for this.
 

RankAmateur

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on 750 it is a no issue at all. there is nothing it cannot do, it is only a routine that differs. i can run it either as a batch, or can check measure every powder drop, there is nothing much to it, really. seating die is very precise there, as well as a whole platform, i really see no benefit at all to have an alternative setup for this.
Hi. I hope you're not interpreting my previous statement as a criticism of your (or anyone's) gear. My statement was that I don't load my precision rifle rounds on my Dillon, and I don't. Ensuring that I'm responding fairly, you wrote that "I (you) really see no benefit at all to have an alternative setup for this". So, we are each expressing a personal opinion or preference.

Your description of the capabilities of the 750 can be generalized. I know people who have and love their single stage presses, and they accurately reflect that there is nothing they cannot do. You are correct that it is the process that differs. For some of my rounds, I want to check the force of bullet seating, and use custom wildcat honed chamber dies with an arbor press/force gauge for that process. I'm sure I could have dies made for my Dillon, but I'm not sure how I would assess force. Measuring seating force is likely not necessary, but I think it is one example of what can't be done on a Dillon. I prefer to do a number of precision steps on some of my rounds that I find simpler to do with arbor or turret presses. I also weight-match every charge, so a powder drop is less practical for that process. Again, I load high volumes of pistol cartridges on my Dillon, and find it is the best tool for that process. If a 750 (or other Dillon) meets all of your needs, great. In the limit, a press is a press, but the characteristics of each press may or may not best facilitate a desired process or result.
 

DarrenL

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I am using the RCBS lock out die, has anyone used that but then found a better one? The dillon contraption looks like it can detect low and high charges, whereas the RCBS basically detects zero and double. I do like that it locks the press. Anyone use the Dillon or the hornady powder cop?
 
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IMO Dillon's are for volume not match precision. Loading match rifle is not a drag race to bang out 200 rounds as fast as possible. My critical step with my match ammo is seating depth. I single stage load with Redding Comp dies and I like to verify each round's seat depth with a Larry Willis headspace gauge off the ogive . It's my best piece of mind method for ensuring and maintaining my required bullet jump. I've loaded .308 short range plinking ammo on my 650 and it does a good job. I do get case feed jams occasionally but it's not a big deal.
 

ddeck22

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I’ve used the Hornady powder cop.

It works well to give a visual indicator for zero and potentially double charges. I’ve found that the exact location will differ if you use range brass, so it won’t rise to the same spot each time even with the same charge. So, you have to learn the eyeball “acceptable” range.

I primarily use Titegroup which has very low charge weights, so hence you have to be careful with the amounts.
 
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It can be tough to accurately verify "by eye" charging bottleneck rifle (especially say .243 and smaller calibers). The times when I do run .308 and ,223 I do use the Dillon powder check alarm. Not really needed for straightwall pistol calibers as now its much easier to verify your powder level unless your charging a very light volume charge in a long casing
 

wegman

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I have been using the Dillons for both pistol and rifle rounds. I have a little magnetic LED light that I twist around so I can see into the pistol cases.
I agree that they are most useful to show a potential double charge or no powder situation.
When I would get the buzzer go off, I pull and weigh the charge. Never off enough not to just dump it back into the case and continue. So not an accurate measure of the powder charge...
 
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