Be careful with regional slang. . . . .

Garys

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No kidding. They finally opened the express lane on the MoPac, and it doesn't make any difference. I-35 through the city is at a standstill 24 hours a day.
Austin is no longer even remotely the city I used to love going to in the '80s, '90s, and as little as ten years ago. It's overbuilt, full of hipsters, has serious crime in the southern edges of downtown, and of course traffic. In addition, it's expensive as all hell.

There's hardly a trace of Texas left in that city. UT Austin is every bit as liberal as UC Berkley. The Austin City Council, or whatever they call it, is every bit as liberal as the Cambridge City Council.


In Austin traffic, it probably took the police over five hours just to get there.
 

Garys

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Some people from up here, even the ones that consider themselves pretty conservative, seem to have a sneering contempt for anyone from "the south". Except for Florida, which is really only the south up north in the panhandle.

I have friends from LA, MS, AR, TN, TX, SC, and other states down south. They aren't the hicks that conceited northerners seem to think that they are, not at all. While those people make fun of southern accents, they should here what people in the south think about the way we talk.

One thing I will say for sure. In general, people from the south are a lot friendly and more welcoming of strangers than people up here.

Yanno, "down south" is a pretty big area. Check an atlas and compare it to New England, and then consider how many different accents there are in Boston alone, let alone the rest of NE.

Where I grew up, "coke" (the generic term for soft drink) is one syllable. If you want the one headquartered in Atlanta, it's "Co-Coler".
 
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Funny, I was watching a video on faceplant that depicted Mark Wahlberg (you guys claim him right?) where he was sitting there with an ipad and describing various local slang terms for "non Bostonians" there were various terms like "bang a u'ey" U-turn, wicked, and such and in fact, Jimmies was one of the terms, and he casually brushed it off as being widely known as rubbers, condoms or whatever. So.....maybe it varies within Boston as well? I can see the humor in your daughters situation. That or its another chance for you to bag on Missouri like you often do.
Grew up in western CT, closer to NY. We called sprinkles 'shots', when I moved to MA for school & learned they were called 'jimmies' and all I could think of is this old KRS-1/BDP song:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VewU3GDvC_k
 

greencobra

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In general, people from the south are a lot friendly and more welcoming of strangers than people up here.
a lot of sotherners will look you in the face and smile at you all day long....party's over when they hang with their own. out come their true feelings. particularly in tennessee, west virginia, kentucky and alabama off the top of my head. some of these people are afraid outsiders will change their way of life. and you know what, I don't think they're wrong.
 

Uzi2

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a lot of sotherners will look you in the face and smile at you all day long....party's over when they hang with their own. out come their true feelings. particularly in tennessee, west virginia, kentucky and alabama off the top of my head. some of these people are afraid outsiders will change their way of life. and you know what, I don't think they're wrong.
Thats because they are NOT WRONG.
 

Wickedcoolname

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I've never heard of anything else called Jimmies, but did know it was a regional thing that other areas didn't use. All my life soda was called tonic. Although I do find myself using the term soda more often now that I travel alot just to avoid confusion.
I live in central Mass and the only guy I know who says tonic is from Waltham. Everyone else I know says soda. Although my sister from Mississippi says pop.
 

AHM

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Try reading the comments. Wow people are stupid. I can't see how some people got all twisted up by the reasonable explanations of the origin of the term.
The Boston Globe is the sound of stupidity entering the body politic.

Sorry it's rotated, and my apologies to all the friends of Bill W.

LOL.

 

Garys

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The shocker is that you moved from TX to NH! ;) Just kidding, I'm sure you had reasons for it.

The only shocker when we moved from TX to NH, was finding that some people are seriously offended if you call them Sir or Ma'am.
 

greencobra

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And I remember when flip-flops were called thongs.
I lived in hawaii for a while as a kid, they were called thongs there. everyone wore 'em there then. of course there was no such thing then as the thong we know now. I suspect strippers did wear something like it then but they were called "those things strippers wore."
 

mwalsh9152

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Always called them jimmies and always will. If people think it's racist, that's their problem.
Exactly! I refuse to bow to the PC f***tards. If anything, I will 100% push the boundaries way more than I typically would in their presence.
 
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New England has some really localized names for our fish as well, as I found out while spending time in Wisconsin at school years ago. we know what kivvers are, and horned pout, togue, calico bass, landlocks and cusk as well. The rest of the country had no clue what I was talking about, so I translated for them to Midwestern names.
 
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We wore rubbers on our feet to stay dry in the rain.
The picture is of two Jimmy caps. They keep offensive odors out of the house when doing waste or vent work. Not sure it would be safe to clamp one on your johnson.
Speaking of SAFE, isn't that the same thing as a Missouri "jimmy"?
 
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I've also inadvertently insulted people outside New England by calling adults "good kids" and "good shits"
Yeah, I've run in to that a few times. I think people just take themselves too seriously in lots of places.
The thing I run up against most down here is care and mind have opposite meanings as up north. Where I grew up if someone said "Hey, If you don't care.." It was usually followed with something synonymous with "Well then you can go **** yourself." Down here it is the same as "If you don't mind." And is followed with something like "Would you pass me that tool?", etc. Also, If you don't care to do something, down here it means it doesn't bother you, up north it means you don't like it.

Mind is kind of the opposite as down here it means to pay attention, so using it the way I'm used to comes off as being insulting or snide.
 
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