Basement window recommendations?

andrew1220

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I need to replace three ~32"x22" hopper style windows in my basement. They're drafty and allow wind driven rainwater to come in and soak the sill.
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I've looked at some different types of awning and hopper windows at Home Depot and aside from the Andersen 400 series awning windows, they all seem extremely flimsy and cheaply made? Namely the American Craftsman hopper windows that were like $80ish.

I want a good quality window that will keep the cold out during the winter. The Andersen 400 series awning's were nice but the opening is fairly limited due to the track/hinge on the bottom.

The current windows I have are Andersen (installed in the 80s and Andersen doesn't seem to make this style anymore) which open inward from the bottom which is nice - easy to move/throw larger items out the window. I don't really want the sliders as the opening isn't very big.

Any advice/recommendations on energy efficient hopper style windows? Doesn't have to be Andersen as long as they're well insulated/energy efficient etc. Open to other designs I suppose.

Just trying to find a window that I can have a carpenter install. They all need new exterior trim and maybe some frame work depending on the size of the new windows.

Thanks guys!
 
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I have to replace some windows in my crawlspace. I am not quite sure how to do the framing, as it needs to be boards and cement.
 

ldi

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Replacing a Basement Window - Fine Homebuilding

In Andrew’s case no framing required. Just get a good quality basement hoper window with the nailing fin. You going to be replacing the exterior trim anyway.

Coyote, I don’t know whether your windows through the foundation, through the frame or half in between. Pictures would help.
 
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Tinkermatic

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Harvey is decent and it’s one of the few that you can make Energy Star. It’s an upgrade as most hoppers aren’t Energy Star certified. The company I work for is a Harvey house primarily and we typically sell K&C hoppers. They’re more cost effective, open 90 degrees and are just as decent quality wise. They’re out of franklin. Just be sure you or your carpenter take their time, measure properly (rough opening vs. tip to tip) and install and insulate properly. Any modern hopper window will solve your problem if installed properly. You can buy the best, most efficient window out there and it won’t do a darn bit of good if not measured and installed properly OR if you have bigger issues at hand. You wouldn’t believe how many people think new windows will solve a leaky roof or help with uninsulated walls. Replacement windows are just a piece piece of the puzzle. So pick whatever you like and fits your budget, and do it right.
 

andrew1220

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Harvey is decent and it’s one of the few that you can make Energy Star. It’s an upgrade as most hoppers aren’t Energy Star certified. The company I work for is a Harvey house primarily and we typically sell K&C hoppers. They’re more cost effective, open 90 degrees and are just as decent quality wise. They’re out of franklin. Just be sure you or your carpenter take their time, measure properly (rough opening vs. tip to tip) and install and insulate properly. Any modern hopper window will solve your problem if installed properly. You can buy the best, most efficient window out there and it won’t do a darn bit of good if not measured and installed properly OR if you have bigger issues at hand. You wouldn’t believe how many people think new windows will solve a leaky roof or help with uninsulated walls. Replacement windows are just a piece piece of the puzzle. So pick whatever you like and fits your budget, and do it right.
Forgot about Harvey. Just checked their website and looks like they don't open 90 degrees

How are those K&C hoppers when it comes to energy efficiency? Comparable to Harvey? I just want whatever will help keep my basement warmer/less drafty during the winter - if that means I need to go with an Awning style window from Andersen or Harvey I'll do that. But if there are hopper windows that open 90 degrees AND are just as energy efficient as an awning, I'd buy those.

You're definitely right when it comes to proper installation and insulation! My grandparents spent a fortune on replacement windows and they cracked and get condensation during the winter, just a couple years after installation. They definitely didn't use someone who was qualified.

If you recommend those K&C hoppers, maybe I could buy them from you?...Or recommend any installers that service Gloucester? I just need to figure out how to measure them the correct way - though I would hope my carpenter knows. He did a great job installing my Andersen 400 series windows a couple years ago.

Really appreciate your help!
 

andrew1220

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You can move the stop screw up, there is another hole. It's been awhile since I have installed one. But when the screw is moved I think they open pretty close to 90 degrees.
Oh okay cool. Maybe I'll call Harvey to confirm. Thanks!
 

BigTimber

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Harvey’s for the win. Hopper/roller they’ll have what your contractor needs. FYI need an account. Also you’re going to want to factor in some rot fixing possibly.
 

andrew1220

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Harvey’s for the win. Hopper/roller they’ll have what your contractor needs. FYI need an account. Also you’re going to want to factor in some rot fixing possibly.
I don't know if my carpenter has an account with Harvey. I'll have to shoot him a text. The framing one the inside looks fine but there's some rot on the exterior trim which I'm having him replace with the PVC stuff. I'm done dealing with primed pine trim around windows. Wish I used PVC on the 13 windows I had replaced a couple years ago...
 

Spanz

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I don't know if my carpenter has an account with Harvey. I'll have to shoot him a text. The framing one the inside looks fine but there's some rot on the exterior trim which I'm having him replace with the PVC stuff. I'm done dealing with primed pine trim around windows. Wish I used PVC on the 13 windows I had replaced a couple years ago...
there is pvc "wood" now you can use in wet locations too...so if you need framing...you can do that also with plastic
 

Tinkermatic

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Forgot about Harvey. Just checked their website and looks like they don't open 90 degrees

How are those K&C hoppers when it comes to energy efficiency? Comparable to Harvey? I just want whatever will help keep my basement warmer/less drafty during the winter - if that means I need to go with an Awning style window from Andersen or Harvey I'll do that. But if there are hopper windows that open 90 degrees AND are just as energy efficient as an awning, I'd buy those.

You're definitely right when it comes to proper installation and insulation! My grandparents spent a fortune on replacement windows and they cracked and get condensation during the winter, just a couple years after installation. They definitely didn't use someone who was qualified.

If you recommend those K&C hoppers, maybe I could buy them from you?...Or recommend any installers that service Gloucester? I just need to figure out how to measure them the correct way - though I would hope my carpenter knows. He did a great job installing my Andersen 400 series windows a couple years ago.

Really appreciate your help!
If you get the Harvey Energy star upgrade, the K&C don't really compare. Your carpenter obviously has access to Anderson windows so that may be what you have to go with and Anderson makes a decent window as well. I'd be cautious with the awning style though. They open outward and the complication of a crank typically adds to the cost. Think of a casement style, it's just more complicated. Sometimes windows develop stress cracks after installation, if that's the case your relatives should have a warranty claim. Here's the thing with condensation, it's more apt to develop on the inside of windows after they're replaced. You're always going to have heat transfer. A more efficient window means the warm moist air inside your house isn't coming in contact with cool air coming from an older or drafty window. This leads to condensation on the cold glass of your brand new window. If it's -20 and blowing outside and you have the heat cranked, and you're making pulled pork all day for the game with the humidifier running(read excess moisture), you're brand new Energy Star .23 U factor windows can and will develop frost on the inside of the glass. You're talking about an 80+ degree temperature variance. A drafty window means that air inside cools as it approaches the glass and you have less of a temperature difference and thus less room for condensation to form and or turn to ice. Sorry this is getting wordy, but it's important that people know replacement windows aren't a quick fix. Two layers of glass some vinyl and argon aren't going to stop wind driven rain from getting under your 60 year old roof and dripping down the interior of your 100 year old house and coming out the window sill(hypothetical). Cracking open an old window and replacing it can create an easier path for preexisting problems to manifest at what is now a new and better widow, even if installed and measured properly.

Also, Harvey has a great warranty(check on the hoppers, I know their double hung windows are 20 years transferable) and they're relatively local.
 

andrew1220

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Azek all the way.
Yup that’s probably what I’ll have the carpenter use. Worth the small upcharge from primed pine.
I’ve heard the only possible downside with PVC trim/siding is how much it expands and contracts compared to wood? Then again these are small piece of trim not 25 foot boards.
 

andrew1220

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If you get the Harvey Energy star upgrade, the K&C don't really compare. Your carpenter obviously has access to Anderson windows so that may be what you have to go with and Anderson makes a decent window as well. I'd be cautious with the awning style though. They open outward and the complication of a crank typically adds to the cost. Think of a casement style, it's just more complicated. Sometimes windows develop stress cracks after installation, if that's the case your relatives should have a warranty claim. Here's the thing with condensation, it's more apt to develop on the inside of windows after they're replaced. You're always going to have heat transfer. A more efficient window means the warm moist air inside your house isn't coming in contact with cool air coming from an older or drafty window. This leads to condensation on the cold glass of your brand new window. If it's -20 and blowing outside and you have the heat cranked, and you're making pulled pork all day for the game with the humidifier running(read excess moisture), you're brand new Energy Star .23 U factor windows can and will develop frost on the inside of the glass. You're talking about an 80+ degree temperature variance. A drafty window means that air inside cools as it approaches the glass and you have less of a temperature difference and thus less room for condensation to form and or turn to ice. Sorry this is getting wordy, but it's important that people know replacement windows aren't a quick fix. Two layers of glass some vinyl and argon aren't going to stop wind driven rain from getting under your 60 year old roof and dripping down the interior of your 100 year old house and coming out the window sill(hypothetical). Cracking open an old window and replacing it can create an easier path for preexisting problems to manifest at what is now a new and better widow, even if installed and measured properly.

Also, Harvey has a great warranty(check on the hoppers, I know their double hung windows are 20 years transferable) and they're relatively local.
Gotcha, thank you for the great information! Definitely sound very knowledgeable in this field.

Ya I really don’t want to get an awning style due to 2 of the 3 windows being next to my walkway and don’t want them protruding out for someone to possibly bump into and damage them (especially at night).

My carpenter uses Andersen or Pella. Basically what he can get at HD or Lowe’s. Last time he bought the windows in NH (has a home up there) to save on sales tax and try to help lower the cost for me. I don’t know if he can get Harvey windows, I’d have to ask. I like the energy rating and appearance of the Harvey hopper windows so I’ll see if he can manage to get those. No idea what they cost. Since it’s only 3 windows I’m willing to spend a fair amount of money but not outrageous since I got other double hung windows needing to be replaced.

And just to clarify (as I’m not sure if I misinterpreted some parts of your post) these will be new construction windows (not replacement) as I want the exterior trim replaced with PVC/Azek. For what that’s worth.

Good point on the leaky roof/wind driven rain issue. I certainly have this problem on other areas of my house. Rainwater gets through the siding, Tyvek, and onto the interior clapboards. It’s been driving me insane for the last 6 years I’ve owned the house. From what other carpenters have told me, it’s either the rusty nail holes or water getting underneath the old shingles and running down the wall. Or a combination of both.
Pretty funny you mentioned that. See my thread from last year if interested...[laugh]
Rainwater behind siding + housewrap. Help

Anyway, don’t want to drift too far off topic lol.

So is it only possible to get Harvey windows through a certified Harvey contractor??

Andersen doesn’t make hopper windows so...
 

Spanz

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And just to clarify (as I’m not sure if I misinterpreted some parts of your post) these will be new construction windows (not replacement) as I want the exterior trim replaced with PVC/Azek. For what that’s worth.

Good point on the leaky roof/wind driven rain issue. I certainly have this problem on other areas of my house. Rainwater gets through the siding, Tyvek, and onto the interior clapboards. It’s been driving me insane for the last 6 years I’ve owned the house. From what other carpenters have told me, it’s either the rusty nail holes or water getting underneath the old shingles and running down the wall. Or a combination of both.
Pretty funny you mentioned that. See my thread from last year if interested...[laugh]
Rainwater behind siding + housewrap. Help


Andersen doesn’t make hopper windows so...

you want to use "Drainable housewrap" if you ever take off the shingles/clapboards. Like this stuff:
Benjamin Obdyke HydroGap Drainable Housewrap, 5' x 100' Roll (500 sq. ft.) - Summer Promotion - Energy Conscious

it has tiny dimples that hold it off the sheathing, so it can dry out if it ever gets wet. Tyvek...just lets the damp wood sit there
 

andrew1220

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If you want Harvey windows let me know. I will order them for you or let you use my account. I don't mind helping out a fellow NES member.
You are the man! I will probably take you up on this if I can figure out how to properly measure the window. Measuring from the edge of the framing, it seems like it’s just a hair under 32" wide and just a hair under 22" tall. I’ll get ahold of my carpenter and see if he’s cool with me buying them myself.
 

andrew1220

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you want to use "Drainable housewrap" if you ever take off the shingles/clapboards. Like this stuff:
Benjamin Obdyke HydroGap Drainable Housewrap, 5' x 100' Roll (500 sq. ft.) - Summer Promotion - Energy Conscious

it has tiny dimples that hold it off the sheathing, so it can dry out if it ever gets wet. Tyvek...just lets the damp wood sit there
I’d love to get my house resided with Azek/PVC stuff but I just don’t have the money. Of course I can take out a construction loan but it’s not worth it at the moment.
Wish they had that drainable wrap 30+ years ago when my house was sided....
 

Spanz

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I’d love to get my house resided with Azek/PVC stuff but I just don’t have the money. Of course I can take out a construction loan but it’s not worth it at the moment.
Wish they had that drainable wrap 30+ years ago when my house was sided....

its only for the trim pieces. Not to re-side the whole house with.
 

andrew1220

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My carpenter just keeps pushing me off. I understand their situation. He told me up front he’s got a big job that’s going on. I’m just small potatoes to his other jobs. But I’ve got 9 windows plus siding work that I want done. Not super cheap either...

Anyway, he told me today he could probably do it around thanksgiving. Not sure if it’s ideal to install windows that late. Aside from heat loss I was concerned about sealants/caulkings not curing properly due to the cold. Thoughts?

I guess we’ll have to play it by ear. Could have warm days and also real cold days at the end of November.

Trying to space home projects out as best I can. I need a new roof and new exterior paint ASAP. Ugh.
 

andrew1220

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Speaking of sill it looks like you need to replace that also.
Looks worse in the photos. It’s solid. The paint has worn off from getting wet over the years but I’ve poked it with a knife and couldn’t find any soft spots.

I did find a rotted section of sill/rim joist below my front door/steps recently. I had water leaking down below the door earlier in the year and caulked some areas of the door and threshold that the previous carpenter forgot...I don’t believe any water is getting in now but it’s too late now. Plenty of damage has been done.

That’s going to be fun to repair since the front steps cover it from the outside. No idea if it can be repaired from the inside. I sure hope I don’t have to demo the front steps....
 

Tinkermatic

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My carpenter just keeps pushing me off. I understand their situation. He told me up front he’s got a big job that’s going on. I’m just small potatoes to his other jobs. But I’ve got 9 windows plus siding work that I want done. Not super cheap either...

Anyway, he told me today he could probably do it around thanksgiving. Not sure if it’s ideal to install windows that late. Aside from heat loss I was concerned about sealants/caulkings not curing properly due to the cold. Thoughts?

I guess we’ll have to play it by ear. Could have warm days and also real cold days at the end of November.

Trying to space home projects out as best I can. I need a new roof and new exterior paint ASAP. Ugh.
The company I work for installs windows almost year round. The only mitigating factors are heavy precipitation, and severe cold. Any smart installer is only going to have one opening open at a time. Just take care to section off the house, close doors, crank the heat the night before, put down some drop cloths or old blankets if there's snow on the ground, things like that. Sealants like OSI Quad have a working temp of 0 to 120 degrees F as well as wet surface application, which gives you a pretty broad range of scenarios. Don't hesitate to ask the carpenter what he's going to be using and make sure he's not cheaping out. Since the window is, or should be, nailed in place and secured, the caulk is simply a sealeant for gaps and shouldn't be load bearing. It will of course, take a bit longer to dry but it's perfectly fine to install windows in the cold.
 

silversquirrel

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That OSI quad adhesive is amazing.
I fixed a few loose bricks on a doorstep landing, on a 20 degree day. I hoped it would be good enough till spring, but its held up a few years now, rain, snow and ice! Stuff sticks like crazy.
 

Spanz

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My carpenter just keeps pushing me off. I understand their situation. He told me up front he’s got a big job that’s going on. I’m just small potatoes to his other jobs. But I’ve got 9 windows plus siding work that I want done. Not super cheap either...
all the trades are flat out...starting from late spring to now...good luck finding anyone
 
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You'd think some of them would take small jobs to fill in the times between big jobs. I have 5 windows to replace. I'd be fine if they did one every two weeks when they can squeeze them in. Same with odd jobs for plumbing (temptrol shower handle) and electrical.
 
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