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AR-15 Lubrication

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One of the ways I have read on keeping the bolt and carrier lubed up is by using a high temperature bearing grease. What are the approximate temperatures reached in the receiver during operation?
 

je25ff

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"A properly lubricated firearm will have as light amount of lubrication flowing away from the intended surfaces. Any
surface that holds all the lubricant applied to it is probably not lubricated well
enough."

Did not realize..
 
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FWIW, I take a patch or two, hold them over the opening of a bottle of Mobil 1, soak the patch and use that to coat all surfaces of the bolt carrier group (except for the face itself) with a fairly heavy coat of oil. This includes the bolt, carrier and cam pin. I also coat the internal portion of the charging handle. For the trigger group, I like this stuff:

Smith-Wesson-SW001-Advanced-Gun-Oil-with-Cerflon-4-oz..jpg


It foams which helps get into smaller parts.
 

je25ff

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I haven't used my AR over the winter but am going to the range this weekend and wanted to give it a thorough cleaning. According to my old school Colt AR guide, it says to oil the

Windage sights
Ejection port latches and springs
action springs
charging handle

Makes sense..but it says to oil also :

inside rear of bolt
mouth of bolt key
bolt carrier exhaust ports
forward assist

I had always assumed that you want to oil the entire bolt carrier assembly? Is this true?

Inside rear of bolt?

zu43ls.jpg
 
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FWIW, I take a patch or two, hold them over the opening of a bottle of Mobil 1, soak the patch and use that to coat all surfaces of the bolt carrier group (except for the face itself) with a fairly heavy coat of oil. This includes the bolt, carrier and cam pin. I also coat the internal portion of the charging handle. For the trigger group, I like this stuff:

Smith-Wesson-SW001-Advanced-Gun-Oil-with-Cerflon-4-oz..jpg


It foams which helps get into smaller parts.

You don't need to coat the whole BCG. You really want to just look for the metal that rubs on metal parts. Usually only four little "rails" on the BCG that need to be lubed. Anything else is just going to attract dust/dirt.
 

whatluck

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I was taught that you don't lube the rear part of the BCG that goes into the buffer tube to help help it free of gunk.

The forward portion of it I keep wet, and this works for me.

Dry lube is a good option for ARs IMO, haven't had any problems with mil tec or mpro but I don't run my guns that hard either.
 
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You don't need to coat the whole BCG. You really want to just look for the metal that rubs on metal parts. Usually only four little "rails" on the BCG that need to be lubed. Anything else is just going to attract dust/dirt.

True but then I'd have to think about it and having a lot of oil on it actually makes cleanup easier since the carbon gets suspended in the oil and I can just wipe it all off.
 

je25ff

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I ended up putting a bit of oil in the rear bolt and around the spring for the bolt rear cover. I also put some oil on the 4 "rails" to the left and right of the bolt assembly, but I doubt this will remain after a couple hundred rounds are put through it this weekend.
 
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I have used militech1 lubricant on all my M-4's in the military, and at home for the past 6 years. Both in Iraq and Afghanistan, my weapon has never jamed on me ever. I lube the friction points on the bolt, light coat where the gas rings are, and MOST important, I take some lube make a small puddle in my hand and coat the buffer spring real good. I have seen many guys not lube there buffer spring, and the spring ends up causing so much friction in the tube, it has trouble not having enough ummph to strip a round off the mag when firing.
 
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I have used militech1 lubricant on all my M-4's in the military, and at home for the past 6 years. Both in Iraq and Afghanistan, my weapon has never jamed on me ever. I lube the friction points on the bolt, light coat where the gas rings are, and MOST important, I take some lube make a small puddle in my hand and coat the buffer spring real good. I have seen many guys not lube there buffer spring, and the spring ends up causing so much friction in the tube, it has trouble not having enough ummph to strip a round off the mag when firing.

buffer spring, thanks for that tip (and for your service)

i was always told clp is best for AR's. i use break fee CLP on most of the guns i shoot often and ezzox on my carry & my dust collectors. love the eezox because its "dry" and its corrosion resistance is great but im gonna start greasing the major friction points tho because some complain about eezox lubrication specs (ive never had an issue)
 
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Well from what Militech1 claims is once you lube the weapon then shoot till you get to a good "operating temp" the lube soaks into the metal pours. I tend to believe it, cause when my weapon is pretty dry the bolt feels pretty slick. I don't prefer CLP cause it is to thin of a oil to begin with, then you get it hot, it does not hold up well in the heat, tends to evaperate. I don't care to much for the "dry" lubes, I found a gritty gun that is lubed still will shoot when you need it to, but a dry gritty gun will jam (in my experiences).
 
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Bottom line is ARs/M16s like to run wet. Keep them wet, they stay happy. I've been trying out a bottle of Slip2000 and so far it works great, but then again so did CLP, which I do agree is on the thin side.

Mike
 
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+1. I use 20wt synthetic on my centerfire guns and 0 or 5wt on the rimfires. I'm not real picky as to the brand, I use whatever is left over from the oil changes in the truck and motorcycle.

For you purists out there, there isn't a lot of real synthetic on the market. The only two I can think of offhand are Amsoil and Royal Purple, but I'm sure there are others. The major manufacturers like Mobil and Castrol are selling blends as pure synthetics.
 
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+1. I use 20wt synthetic on my centerfire guns and 0 or 5wt on the rimfires. I'm not real picky as to the brand, I use whatever is left over from the oil changes in the truck and motorcycle.

For you purists out there, there isn't a lot of real synthetic on the market. The only two I can think of offhand are Amsoil and Royal Purple, but I'm sure there are others. The major manufacturers like Mobil and Castrol are selling blends as pure synthetics.

Got a cite on that?

I know Mobil 1 has started selling some with that branding that are really blends. Other types of Mobil 1 are still supposed to be full synthetic.

For a gun though, I really doubt it matters. The abuse motor oil gets in an engine is far worse.
 
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Got a cite on that?

I know Mobil 1 has started selling some with that branding that are really blends. Other types of Mobil 1 are still supposed to be full synthetic.

For a gun though, I really doubt it matters. The abuse motor oil gets in an engine is far worse.

The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has changed the requirements for synthetic motor oil. Synthetic blends can now be sold as "Synthetic" motor oil. I believe I got this tidbit off of the Amsoil web site.
 
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