Another HOA nightmare

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Folks moved there knowing full well that they were moving into that kind of community, They were willing to give up "Personal" control of their homes. I have absolutely no sympathy for them.
That doesn't seem to be the issue as much as people not knowing who to pay their fees to. It almost seems like a scam to steal people's homes. Create confusion even those paying were supposedly sending their money into the ether.
 
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Some HOA's work well in a condo setting, but they can be a frek'n nightmare if the wrong people are elected to the board. Even if the right people are on the board, you have to pay attention to every meeting to make sure they spend money wisely. Some people that get on the board are in it for their own interests and cause a lot of trouble. It's difficult to get rid of them but it's possible with a recall if everyone is on the same page. It gets even more frustrating if the board acts like the Obama administration and just wants to spend every last cent saved on senseless projects.
 
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Some HOA's work well in a condo setting, but they can be a frek'n nightmare if the wrong people are elected to the board.
There was an interesting case in Nevada where a law firm was having its moles buy up condos (even fractional ownership); getting its moles elected to the board; then steering condo money to hire the lawfirm to sue the builder for defective construction, then using the settlement to hire it's affiliated contractor. The firm convinced the condo assn to let it count the ballots, and rigged the election to get its own people on the board.

Another problem is inefficiencies - the association hires a management company which hires contractors that are easiest for the management company to deal with, often paying more than an individual homeowner would. And, if you want to replace your deck/window, you have to dot every i and cross every t - providing proof of permits, insurance, etc. to the association - unless, of course, you hire their recommended contractor.
 

blindfire

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Zero sympathy for anyone who WILLINGLY signs up for one of those places. You deserve what you get.
 

Spanz

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the way these things work....there is usually some pushy retired lawyer who takes over these things, and after that it is their way or the highway. Think of Ocasio Cortez, retired with nothing better to do, manipulating your retirement home!

:(

stay far away!
 

Brewer

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the way these things work....there is usually some pushy retired lawyer who takes over these things, and after that it is their way or the highway. Think of Ocasio Cortez, retired with nothing better to do, manipulating your retirement home!

:(

stay far away!
You remind me of a funny story in "The Millionaire Next Door" of a man who was one of the principal investors in a new luxury condo development. The builder needed 50% of units sold in order to build. Mr. W bought all the units of a certain style. With that "monopoly" he made a nice return selling the units upon the building's completion. He kept one for his family's vacations for a few weeks per year, but more importantly he had the chance to write his dog into the development's declarations.

"I have a dog. Call him the six-figure doggie. I have sold several condominiums because the people passed dog laws. They told me, 'You know, you've got to get rid of the dog.' I'll sell an entire building before I get rid of my dog."

The new neighbors were mostly flashy, high-nosed types. Each reviewed the declaration before buying and knew Mr. W had the dog who was an exception to the rules. They later banded together and gave him a hard time about it anyway. He said deal with it, I'm authorized. They continued sending intimidating letters. One of the resident lawyers confronted him, saying they decided at their last meeting that they would take legal action if he didn't get rid of the dog. Mr. W pointed out this guy wasn't even licensed to practice law in that state.

Finally Mr. W went to one of their meetings and said he would leave with his dog but turn over his condo to the blue-collar company he owned so employees could vacation there every week of the year in perpetuity. They voted that he could keep his dog.

In then end he sold the unit and left all of them to their uppity selves, concluding, "I don't want to live in a building with people who don't like dogs."
 

boiler_eng

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You remind me of a funny story in "The Millionaire Next Door" of a man who was one of the principal investors in a new luxury condo development. The builder needed 50% of units sold in order to build. Mr. W bought all the units of a certain style. With that "monopoly" he made a nice return selling the units upon the building's completion. He kept one for his family's vacations for a few weeks per year, but more importantly he had the chance to write his dog into the development's declarations.

"I have a dog. Call him the six-figure doggie. I have sold several condominiums because the people passed dog laws. They told me, 'You know, you've got to get rid of the dog.' I'll sell an entire building before I get rid of my dog."

The new neighbors were mostly flashy, high-nosed types. Each reviewed the declaration before buying and knew Mr. W had the dog who was an exception to the rules. They later banded together and gave him a hard time about it anyway. He said deal with it, I'm authorized. They continued sending intimidating letters. One of the resident lawyers confronted him, saying they decided at their last meeting that they would take legal action if he didn't get rid of the dog. Mr. W pointed out this guy wasn't even licensed to practice law in that state.

Finally Mr. W went to one of their meetings and said he would leave with his dog but turn over his condo to the blue-collar company he owned so employees could vacation there every week of the year in perpetuity. They voted that he could keep his dog.

In then end he sold the unit and left all of them to their uppity selves, concluding, "I don't want to live in a building with people who don't like dogs."
When the wife and I were like looking at houses "NO HOA" was up there in the priorities between walls and indoor plumbing.
 

M1911

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In the first place why move to Florida, a state surrounded by coastline, and decide to live smack in the center of the state? You have miles of beaches and year round warm weather and you move to Orlando? You deserve to lose your house.
My sister lives near Orlando, but that is because her husband is an executive at Disney.
 

allen-1

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It's that time of year again, isn't it?
Just over a year ago: One more reason not to live within a neighborhood association


My comment a year ago, in that thread:
The garage door is BS, the HOA needs to be reined in. I read that and just started laughing. My garage is my workshop. I've got a gunsafe, my reloading stuff, my motorcycle, my rollaways, my bench, my tools, my ammo in there - that door's never open unless I'm in there. Hell, there's an alarm on it. And maybe an extra surprise or two for someone who's not invited.

Like I said, I live in an HOA. We knew when we built this house that there were potential downsides to an HOA, we've lived in a condo before. We attend the meetings, we pay attention, my wife and I are on the committees. We're focused on at least one of us, maybe both ending up as directors.

When you deal with any established power structure you either stay under the radar - or you become part of the power structure.

I drive grey cars/trucks without MOLON LABE stickers and my guns concealed within - that's under the radar. My house is harder to conceal, so I become part of the structure.


The only difference between last year and this year - my wife is now on the board of directors. Please see paragraph two above...

 
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I would never enter an HOA.
Knew a Jeep owner who walked away at the closing. The seller, the real estate agents and his own attorney tried to convince him not to read the covenant until after closing. Nope. He read through it at the closing.
What made him walk away?
1. Ban on air compressors and air tools.
2. Permit required from the HOA for any and all power tools including things like battery powered screw guns.
3. Permit from the HOA to do any work on the home yourself. (The HOA had a list of service providers who paid a commission to the HOA to be on the list.)
4. Doing any auto maintenance, even a simple oil change, was forbidden.
No serious Jeep owner doesn't have an air compressor and power tools.
No self respecting man calls a service provider to do home upgrades or repairs that he has the skills to do himself.
 

Supermoto

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I live in a HOA, more of a community (3.5 square miles)with 4 golf courses, pools, tennis courts, hiking and biking trail. It is also gated with security. The landscaping everywhere is beautifully manicured. Everyone's house looks nice, there are kids playing the streets, people walking their dogs, community bbqs and beer burger get togethers. Its quiet, please don't let their dogs bark for hours on end, no loud pipes save lives jokers. Crime in the community is much lower, pretty much non existent compared to the surrounding area. People here are considerate and respectful to one another.

HOAs started because people couldn't be considerate or respectful. There are terrible one and there are OK one. But at least you know what you are getting into before you buy.
 
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