Ambi pistols, what options are there?

Rating - 100%
2   0   0
Joined
Nov 12, 2010
Messages
11,008
Likes
1,412
Location
Spokane, WA
I'm going to look at an M&P 45 tomorrow I dug the ambi safety and slide release on a mid sized m&p40. Aside from this series, is there anything else that has, or can easily have an ambi slide release and the mag release switched to the other side?

Also, as far as the gun goes, how is an M&P45? Good fit and finish to the series? I'm looking at getting a mid-sized, so it can fit concealed, and isn't too big to carry around when fishing.
 

gerrycaruso

NES Member
Rating - 100%
22   0   0
Joined
Jun 9, 2006
Messages
4,287
Likes
3,270
Location
westford
My son is a lefty and loves Glocks. He uses his left index finger to depress the magazine release and his mag changes are very fast. He doesn't usually use the slide release. He uses the slingshot method or doesn't shoot to slide lock. If he uses the release, he hits it with the same finger.
 
Rating - 100%
17   0   0
Joined
Jan 28, 2012
Messages
102
Likes
1
Location
Westfield
I've found that ambi controls are much more important for long guns. The only thing I want ambi on my pistols is a safety if it has one. Mag release is easy to use with the index finger and like someone already said, train yourself to slingshot the slide and the slide release becomes irrelevant.
 

KH56010

NES Member
Rating - 100%
45   0   1
Joined
Jan 4, 2011
Messages
798
Likes
259
Location
South Shore
M&P 45's are great guns, not sure if I would try to ccw one though, they're pretty meaty. Another poster said the Rugers. I have an SR40C and had an SR9C both excellent shooters and easy to conceal (can take a 5 mile hike with a crossbreed holster and not be uncomfortable)

For OWB, I always take an M&P.
 
Rating - 100%
17   0   0
Joined
Jan 28, 2012
Messages
102
Likes
1
Location
Westfield
Perfectly logical if the primary purpose of the lever was to release the slide. However, the primary purpose is as a slide lock, not release. It is important to be able to lock the slide back if you have a double feed, as it is often very difficult to rip the mag out without first locking the slide back.

It's still not that hard to use with your index finger. If you need to hit the slide lock, your finger shouldn't be on the trigger anyways.
 
Rating - 100%
3   0   0
Joined
Oct 5, 2007
Messages
17,142
Likes
4,880
Location
South Coast
I am left handed and own 2 1911 non ambi Colts.You can get ambi guns or deal with it and own what you want. Taking the safety off and drawing left handed takes some practice but can be done.
 
Last edited:
Rating - 100%
21   0   0
Joined
Dec 5, 2006
Messages
6,665
Likes
2,107
Location
Raleigh NC
If you're interested in a used pistol, the S&W 5906 has an ambidextrous safety. It's also the finest 9mm semiauto ever produced.




Oh, and when I read the thread title I thought "Ambidextrous pistol? Just switch hands, dude."

In other news I am a dumbass.
 

Cuz

NES Member
Rating - 100%
10   0   0
Joined
Apr 12, 2006
Messages
2,586
Likes
851
Location
MA
I am left handed and own 2 1911 non ambi Colts.You can get ambi guns or deal with it and own what you want. Taking the safety off and drawing left handed takes some practice but can be done.

I'd like to know how you draw a cocked and locked 1911 and take the safety off without using your right hand. The only way I can do it on a non-ambi 1911 is to remove the safety while the gun is in the holster. It's much easier with the ambi safety.
 
Rating - 100%
3   0   0
Joined
Oct 5, 2007
Messages
17,142
Likes
4,880
Location
South Coast
I'd like to know how you draw a cocked and locked 1911 and take the safety off without using your right hand. The only way I can do it on a non-ambi 1911 is to remove the safety while the gun is in the holster. It's much easier with the ambi safety.
Over the years us lefties have had to adapt. Put some effort into it and it will work.
 
Rating - 100%
2   0   0
Joined
Nov 12, 2010
Messages
11,008
Likes
1,412
Location
Spokane, WA
Ok, so pulled the trigger and bought an M&P45 in the mall ninja desert brown. Was a good price. I almost picked up a Glock 30, and then drooled on a Glock 29. I checked out a couple Sigs, but their selection there was kinda light in 45 acp with a smaller size. The 10mm is popular here with hunters who head north to the GMU I'm going to be scouting next week which is why I looked at the G29.

No FNs to be seen, and it was kind of a bummer I wasn't looking at 9mm, ton of stuff there, including a couple cherry, used glocks at about $200+ less than what FS is asking. Just didn't fit like the M&P did. Now to get some time in and a couple good holsters.
 
Rating - 100%
21   0   0
Joined
Dec 5, 2006
Messages
6,665
Likes
2,107
Location
Raleigh NC
This thread got me wondering as to whether anyone had ever made a true left-handed pistol. Not one with an ambi safety or mag release, but one designed specifically for left-handed shooters.

A little bit of time on the Google machine and I found this one: The Southpaw.

Starting with ordnance prints, our engineers went about rebuilding the classic 1911 as if it had been designed for lefties from the ground up. Where the current industry tackles the issue of creating a pistol for South Paw’s with terms such as “ambidextrous safety,” and “reversible magazine release,” Cabot went one further – and then some. We inverted John Moses Browning’s 1911 design perfectly. Everything, down the rifling in the barrel has been mirrored and tailored for use specifically by those of the left-handed-persuasion. This pistol comes with the Cabot Guarantee that it will exceed National Match standards for accuracy right out of the box, and will do so for the lefty without you having to chase your shot.

Nice gun but it's $5,250. Oof.

Charter Arms also makes a left-handed revolver, and it's also called the Southpaw.

Charter led the way in developing the first truly left-handed revolver. The Southpaw is identical to the Undercover Lite, but completely reverse-engineered. The cylinder releases and opens to the right side for your lefty convenience.

Interesting stuff.
 

M1911

Moderator
NES Member
Rating - 100%
27   0   0
Joined
Apr 1, 2005
Messages
39,904
Likes
8,473
Location
Near Framingham
I've found that ambi controls are much more important for long guns. The only thing I want ambi on my pistols is a safety if it has one. Mag release is easy to use with the index finger and like someone already said, train yourself to slingshot the slide and the slide release becomes irrelevant.

I've trained myself to use the slide stop - it is about 1/4 to 1/2 second faster than pulling back on the slide.
 
Rating - 100%
16   0   0
Joined
Mar 31, 2008
Messages
2,225
Likes
265
Location
On the right side of the MA/NH border.
I have no trouble with my glocks as a lefty. I use my middle finger to hit the mag release, and that works just fine for me. I'm not sure I'd buy a guy with an external safety unless I knew I could put an Ambi safety on it, like the 1911. Once I added that, it be came so much easier to shoot.
 

Cuz

NES Member
Rating - 100%
10   0   0
Joined
Apr 12, 2006
Messages
2,586
Likes
851
Location
MA
Over the years us lefties have had to adapt. Put some effort into it and it will work.

Gee thanks, that was a lot of help. I was actually thinking I might get an informative response with a sequence I could practice. But I guess I was expecting too much from you.

-cuz
 

Cuz

NES Member
Rating - 100%
10   0   0
Joined
Apr 12, 2006
Messages
2,586
Likes
851
Location
MA
I have no trouble with my glocks as a lefty. I use my middle finger to hit the mag release, and that works just fine for me. I'm not sure I'd buy a guy with an external safety unless I knew I could put an Ambi safety on it, like the 1911. Once I added that, it be came so much easier to shoot.

I tried using my middle finger with no luck. I use my trigger finger which has the added bonus of keeping my finger outside the trigger guard during reloads which is required for USPSA Matches.
-Cuz
 
Rating - 100%
1   0   0
Joined
Dec 18, 2006
Messages
1,422
Likes
106
Location
PA
Being Left-handed, I've never had an issue with a standard (left hand) safety. I have always used the slide lock; it simply takes practice during draw. And I always use the slide lock when changing mags... the only problem I've had were with cheap reloads. Personally I don't buy the rack and release when the mag is empty. It takes too much time, at least in my practice. But 1911's are my choice.... Glocks? No idea. I have no idesire to find out.
 
Rating - 100%
11   0   0
Joined
Apr 14, 2009
Messages
3,765
Likes
488
Location
central worcester county
I'm left handed and always use my left middle finger on mag releases and my left index finger for the slide release. If you rest your trigger finger on the frame below the slide but above the trigger you have plenty of leverage to middle finger the mag release. I've never accidently dropped a mag by overgripping. My Berettas and most of my S&Ws have ambi safeties and I find using either hand equally easy on them so shooting one handed or two doesn't matter. I don't think I've ever use the right side slide release on my M&P9c. I don't know if I would buy a left hand specific pistol because I'm not sure the resale value would be there.

I practice shooting all my guns right handed just to make sure I know how just in case.
 
Rating - 100%
1   0   0
Joined
Dec 18, 2006
Messages
1,422
Likes
106
Location
PA
The important thing is that you can do this reliably under stress; hitting that little lever with your heart at 200 BPMs and your hands shaking from the adrenaline surging through your body can make it a bit tricky. Imagine how much longer it takes to rack and release after trying and failing with the slide stop a few times.

If you haven't trained those fine motor movements under extreme stress, I would suggest that you do.

Truth is, I would hope to never need more than 8 rounds. Or even more so, none. But if need be, zombies don't really run fast so I've heard.
 

Cuthbert Allgood

NES Member
Rating - 100%
57   0   0
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
9,537
Likes
20,393
I'm sorry, I just don't buy the slide stop 'fine motor skill' argument. The trigger pull is a fine motor skill, pressing the bolt release with your thumb is a fine motor skill, looking for your front sight post is a fine motor skill... these are all things you can train (and very often are successfully trained) like anything else.

Edit... that's not to say there aren't other good reasons for training to rack the slide btw. I just don't think fine motor skill is a great argument for it.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom