Airbus targets fuel saving from harnessing wake energy ~ Passenger Jets could soon be Flying in Formation

Dennis in MA

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Well, uh, yeah.

But how do you get 3-12 jets to take off at teh same time, under different companies, to fly, say a cross-atlantic route?? Sure, you've got several dozen Eastern Seaboard planes headed for Northern Europe every night. So you COULD bunch them up. But getting them all lined up would be a royal PITA and require a pile of effort by the pilots to NOT CRASH INTO EACHOTHER.
 

ToddDubya

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Well, uh, yeah.

But how do you get 3-12 jets to take off at teh same time, under different companies, to fly, say a cross-atlantic route?? Sure, you've got several dozen Eastern Seaboard planes headed for Northern Europe every night. So you COULD bunch them up. But getting them all lined up would be a royal PITA and require a pile of effort by the pilots to NOT CRASH INTO EACHOTHER.
Plus the pilots would have to be less drunk
 
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Well, uh, yeah.

But how do you get 3-12 jets to take off at teh same time, under different companies, to fly, say a cross-atlantic route?? Sure, you've got several dozen Eastern Seaboard planes headed for Northern Europe every night. So you COULD bunch them up. But getting them all lined up would be a royal PITA and require a pile of effort by the pilots to NOT CRASH INTO EACHOTHER.
I imagine it would be a fully automated system.... maybe Boeing could design it?
 

Broccoli Iglesias

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Well, uh, yeah.

But how do you get 3-12 jets to take off at teh same time, under different companies, to fly, say a cross-atlantic route?? Sure, you've got several dozen Eastern Seaboard planes headed for Northern Europe every night. So you COULD bunch them up. But getting them all lined up would be a royal PITA and require a pile of effort by the pilots to NOT CRASH INTO EACHOTHER.
And if you manage to get a group together, then you have to deal with breaking up the group. One goes to Scotland, one goes to Ireland, one to England ...

I see this as a cluster F and I dont see them getting close enough to get any real benefits.
 

Mountain

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Fly in someone else's wake turbulence? What could go wrong? When I was flying light aircraft and mixing in with the bigger ones, I always stayed the hell away. Lots of horror stories.

Here's a 330 taking off into clouds, thus showing the wake turbulence. Imagine what a 380 can do.

 

HorizontalHunter

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I love how they make it sound like someone just discovered something geese have been doing forever. What's next, driving really close to the car in front of you improves fuel efficiency?
So that is why they get right up on my a$$ and flash their headlights? They are thanking me for providing them a draft so they can save money on fuel.😉

Bob
 

ReluctantDecoy

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LOL, different scenario though I think Hollyweird mixes in stuff. F14's could stall out their engines with a sudden, very high angle of attack combined with rapid throttle changes. If without power they enter a flat spin, it's over. IIRC in real life there were a few lost.
Hollywood definitely made up some stuff then. Said something about jetwash in that scene.
 
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Wouldn't the second aircraft have a bit of a bumpy ride?

Either way, this is a natural for Tesla's autonomous driving (flying) "schooling" mode.

Stand by for Boeing to announce their new Tetra Class Passenger Jets. Now available in Orange, Yellow and Green.
 

Dennis in MA

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And if you manage to get a group together, then you have to deal with breaking up the group. One goes to Scotland, one goes to Ireland, one to England ...

I see this as a cluster F and I dont see them getting close enough to get any real benefits.
At least the trip from the CA border to Ireland would be in formation. That's several hours. MAYBE it would help. You would have to do it cross-carrier and such. Your IRE/SCO/LON planes in one group. Your Med planes in another. Your FR/GER ones in another. It IS possible. Stupid. But possible.


LOL, different scenario though I think Hollyweird mixes in stuff. F14's could stall out their engines with a sudden, very high angle of attack combined with rapid throttle changes. If without power they enter a flat spin, it's over. IIRC in real life there were a few lost.
In the movie it was all about prop-wash. Or whatever you'd call it from a jet. Sucked in bad air. RIP Goose.
 

NHKevin

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And if you manage to get a group together, then you have to deal with breaking up the group. One goes to Scotland, one goes to Ireland, one to England ...

I see this as a cluster F and I dont see them getting close enough to get any real benefits.
Formation join ups and split ups are done every day. Just not with paying passengers on board.
 
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Spanz

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I call BULLSHIT

wingtip votices are like little Horizontal tornados. The are caused by air pressure being higher under a wing than on top

the are rotating

so even if your planes nose is ten feet behind the plane in front, how do u use that energy?

but more importantly, a second after generating them , the vortex starts to move laterally, so the plane behind will not be able to intercept it At any distance

pilots are well aware of wingtip vortex, if they need to land behind a heavy jet
 

Dennis in MA

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I thought they delayed time between takeoffs because of the turbulence created on takeoff.

At least that's what the pilot said on a fliught I was on when we hit some at low altitude

From start to finish every day (Well, every day before COVID), Atlanta would land and shoot out a plane every minute. One every minute in. One every minute out. All day. Every day.

You KNOW there are delays, so they must be doing near double that at times to catch up. You barely get your jet around the corner on the runway and it's already your turn. Or vice versa, you finally slow the hell down from landing and BOOM, GTFO the runway!
 

NHKevin

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I call BULLSHIT

wingtip votices are like little Horizontal tornados. The are caused by air pressure being higher under a wing than on top

the are rotating

so even if your planes nose is ten feet behind the plane in front, how do u use that energy?

but more importantly, a second after generating them , the vortex starts to move laterally, so the plane behind will not be able to intercept it At any distance

pilots are well aware of wingtip vortex, if they need to land behind a heavy jet
Fly in the side where the vortex is going up.
 
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