72 Hour Bag for Infants

Rating - 100%
3   0   0
Joined
Aug 2, 2008
Messages
5,239
Likes
741
Location
Middletown, RI
While both me and my wife have a 72 hour bag, what is the recommendation for an infant? Is it essentially a diaper bag with formula in it? I realized that essentially it needs to be updated as the infant grows for clothing/diapers. Anything else additional I should have in there?
 

P-14

NES Member
Rating - 100%
28   0   0
Joined
Jun 21, 2007
Messages
8,106
Likes
1,480
Location
Chelsea, MA
SOL bivvy cut down for little ones?
Little wool socks and watch caps for little cold heads and feet?
Water filtration?
Pedialyte?
Digital thermometer?
Diaper rash ointment?
Seal-able Trash bags (for spend diapers)?

I'm trying to think of the basics in my mind: heat preservation, food, water, medical, and sanitation for infants.

When they're sick, you can't ask them what is wrong - so I would think that you would need the most common infant illness OTC meds in the bag.

My thoughts only.
 

P-14

NES Member
Rating - 100%
28   0   0
Joined
Jun 21, 2007
Messages
8,106
Likes
1,480
Location
Chelsea, MA
Nah, just bring your wife's boobs.
And if the infant is with Papa and for whatever reason Mom ain't there? You plan for the worst case and most times the outcome will be better. [wink]

Sent from the Warlock Command Center (in my basement).
 
Rating - 100%
3   0   0
Joined
Aug 2, 2008
Messages
5,239
Likes
741
Location
Middletown, RI
vaseline, or whatever you use for diaper rash. Zombies can hear a crying baby miles away.
Already keep plenty of both in the bag

SOL bivvy cut down for little ones?
Little wool socks and watch caps for little cold heads and feet?
Water filtration?
Pedialyte?
Digital thermometer?
Diaper rash ointment?
Seal-able Trash bags (for spend diapers)?

I'm trying to think of the basics in my mind: heat preservation, food, water, medical, and sanitation for infants.

When they're sick, you can't ask them what is wrong - so I would think that you would need the most common infant illness OTC meds in the bag.

My thoughts only.

Good suggestion, I already keep these items in the diaper bag. Didn't think about heat preservation, will look into that. What about a trauma kit? Should it be adapted for an infant (smaller appendages and such)?
 

P-14

NES Member
Rating - 100%
28   0   0
Joined
Jun 21, 2007
Messages
8,106
Likes
1,480
Location
Chelsea, MA
Good suggestion, I already keep these items in the diaper bag. Didn't think about heat preservation, will look into that. What about a trauma kit? Should it be adapted for an infant (smaller appendages and such)?

I don't know much about infant first aid. You may be able to adapt whatever is in your adult kit to the tyke. I'd worry about dehydration for the little one first, though.
 
Rating - 100%
3   0   0
Joined
Aug 2, 2008
Messages
5,239
Likes
741
Location
Middletown, RI
I don't know much about infant first aid. You may be able to adapt whatever is in your adult kit to the tyke. I'd worry about dehydration for the little one first, though.

I have formula, which can be mixed with water, so that is covered, as well as frozen milk in ice cube trays which can be rationed easier because each cube is 1 oz.
 

P-14

NES Member
Rating - 100%
28   0   0
Joined
Jun 21, 2007
Messages
8,106
Likes
1,480
Location
Chelsea, MA
I have formula, which can be mixed with water, so that is covered, as well as frozen milk in ice cube trays which can be rationed easier because each cube is 1 oz.

Sounds like you have a good plan to me. You will do a good job taking care of your family in a time of crisis. [wink]
 

weekendracer

NES Member
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Joined
Feb 11, 2009
Messages
8,916
Likes
9,903
Location
Tennessee
I'd say powered Gatorade or similar in case of stomach issues that could cause dehydration/electrolyte imbalance. Liquid stuff will be extra weight over the water you should already have.

Ugh, another edit: I say this from my time on the southern border dealing with children crossing the desert. They are a lot more susceptible to sickness while in transit in harsh conditions. Less than pure water won't hurt you as much as a child.
 
Last edited:
Rating - 100%
10   0   0
Joined
Jul 1, 2012
Messages
5,451
Likes
4,595
Location
Portland, ME
Blanket (fleece) preset with Velcro to wrap. Wind and rain shield. (Old jacket is perfect). Crunchier/munchies as they get past 6months. A few 3ml sterile syringes for water delivery on the go.
 

Billy2

Instructor
NES Member
Rating - 100%
119   0   0
Joined
Jan 16, 2006
Messages
1,310
Likes
511
Location
Ma
Cant have enough baby wipes, diapers and spare clothes!

A few small toys and colorfull books to keep them occupied.

teathing rings/biscuts.
 
Rating - 100%
19   0   0
Joined
Oct 21, 2008
Messages
913
Likes
63
Location
Sunny Florida
We used the small 2oz nurser bottles to portion out a container of formula. This made for a easy to use kit. We would dump the powder in a bottle then use the small bottle to measure out the needed water.
 
Rating - 100%
14   0   0
Joined
Aug 27, 2007
Messages
15,355
Likes
10,886
Location
Texas
While both me and my wife have a 72 hour bag, what is the recommendation for an infant? Is it essentially a diaper bag with formula in it? I realized that essentially it needs to be updated as the infant grows for clothing/diapers. Anything else additional I should have in there?

if you have powder formula make sure you pack your own water for the baby. I would suggest bottled water in 8oz size. I wouldn't want to be looking for clean water or having to filter it for an infant. their systems are more delicate and while I may be able to handle some things in my water, I don't think an infant should be subject to it.
 
Rating - 100%
3   0   0
Joined
Aug 2, 2008
Messages
5,239
Likes
741
Location
Middletown, RI
if you have powder formula make sure you pack your own water for the baby. I would suggest bottled water in 8oz size. I wouldn't want to be looking for clean water or having to filter it for an infant. their systems are more delicate and while I may be able to handle some things in my water, I don't think an infant should be subject to it.

I have bulk water stored, and some in each bag. If I get to the point where water is no longer available (after the frozen milk has been depleted) then things are bad. Thankfully I have an extra desalinator that I keep ready when not sailing distance races in the boat (keep it for emergencies): http://www.amazon.com/Katadyn-8013418-Survivor-06-Desalinator/dp/B000F395X0
 
Rating - 96.3%
78   3   0
Joined
Jan 31, 2007
Messages
3,555
Likes
438
Yes, a 72 hour bag for an infant is basically a well prepared diaper bag, but it’s got to be fully stocked and with quantities to last 72 hours.

At first I thought we could rely on my wife’s diaper bag, but I quickly realized that her bag would get depleted after a half day with the baby, and she was slow to restock it. A few times I grabbed it while heading out the door, only to find it was half empty.

As a result, I packed a second bag called the “Dad bag,” which was mostly redundant to the diaper bag, but it was kept fully stocked. It was good enough for 24 hours of use and I would use it on the weekends when I was alone with the baby, but I was more diligent about restocking it every night and I could rely on it always being ready to go.

It’s a generic shoulder/messenger bag with convertible backpack straps (hands free carry is key). I have an ERGO baby carrier that I store with it, and I keep them both hanging in the downstairs closet next to the front door.

A full 72 hour bag was too heavy to be practical for daily use, so I packed a second supplemental duffle bag which had bulk supplies (diapers, formula/food, clothes) which extended the “Dad Bag” from 24 to 72 hours.

As for specifics, keep in mind that every kid is different and there is no perfect bag, and that as you gain more experience as a parent and learn your child’s needs and preferences, you’ll learn you need to add things to the bag, or remove stuff you find you didn’t actually need.
 
Rating - 96.3%
78   3   0
Joined
Jan 31, 2007
Messages
3,555
Likes
438
My bag is compartmentalized, which makes things easy to find and easy to restock.

Easily accessible (outside pouch)
• terry cloth towel or handkerchief
• pacifier or teething toy (for an infant)
• toy or stuffed animal for a quick distraction
• bottle (infant) or juice cup (toddler)
• snack (toddler)

You have to be careful about what’s in the bottle or juice cup, you don’t want it to go bad. As a baby, I kept it empty, with a measured powdered formula and water bottle on the side. Now I keep the actual juice cup empty, and have a sealed juice box or bottle (the kind that’s okay to keep at room temperature) with it that I can use to quickly fill the cup.

Changing station (I keep all the diaper stuff in a Skip Hop Pronto Changing Station. I’m not big into name brand children’s products, but this thing is awesome. Having all your changing items self-contained and easy to pull from your diaper bag makes a change so much easier.).
• changing pad
• diaper wipes
• 3x spare diapers
• Hand sanitizer.
• Ziplock bag for dirty diapers

For food, with an infant you can get away with just having powdered formula and a water bottle (I use a Britta bottle with a built in filter). As they get older you start stocking the bag with those pouches of pureed food, and then later it’s juice boxes, trail mix, etc., etc. Just make sure it’s stuff they’ll actually eat, and you have enough calories to keep them happy for a day. Then put another 48 hour’s worth of food in the supplemental bag. The last thing you want in an emergency is a fussy child.

Clothing – I buy three cheap changes of clothes in each size from a local consignment shop – one for the Dad Bag, two for the supplemental bag. If they last until she outgrows them, I donate them when I go back to the consignment shop to buy the next size. If they get lost, thrown away, or ruined before then, no big deal. Don’t forget a spare jacket or sweatshirt, hat and gloves in the winter, and a spare pair of shoes (toddlers). It’s amazing how quickly and how often they’ll need a change of clothes.

Small first aid kit w/children’s Tylenol (fever), diaper rash cream, gripe water. If you can get a prescription for APNO (all purpose nipple ointment), get it – it’s like windex, that shit works on everything.

Pocket tool (cheap mini Leatherman, the scissors are very handy), headlamp (ever try changing a child in the dark?).

Other miscellaneous
• Disinfecting wipes (for when they inevitably drop something they’ll later put in their mouth)
• Travel/camping tray, bowl & cutlery (more important once the kid is eating solid food)
• Blanket
• Duct tape
• Entertainment items – this seems superfluous, but becomes very important as the baby gets older; in an emergency you’re going to want the kid calm and well distracted.
 

In God We Trust

NES Member
Rating - 100%
14   0   0
Joined
May 21, 2010
Messages
14,487
Likes
13,811
Location
Emmond's Field in the Two Rivers
I would plan for longer than 72 hours for an infant. You and your wife can survive for a few days with no food and little water, but an infant can't.

Figure how long a can of formula lasts. It weighs very little in powder form, so I would pack 3-4 cans.

Also get a good water filter to limit the amount of liquid you need to haul, but keep at least a 2 liter in the bag in case water is scarce.

Keep at least 8 diapers per day (changing every 3 hours) sunscreen, insect repellent, bucket type hat for sun, blankets, warm clothes (4 changes minimum) and a few small toys.

Also baby Tylenol and benedril. The biggest thing is to pack as much formula as you can reasonably carry.
 
Top Bottom