6.5 mm sk ptr m/94 prj m/41

mcb

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I started searching and got lazy. This is worse than Elon Musk kids name.
What is this that I have acquired? Swedish Mauser ammo? What is a Swedish Mauser?

BE9D6166-CC09-4B49-A907-A252B36CD2EE.jpeg
 

NavelOfficer

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This is Swedish ammo commonly known as 6.5x55mm. It is perfectly suited for the M38/94/96 Mausers, the Ljungman AG-42b and many other commercial rifles chambered in the 6.5x55mm (Ruger m77, etc.).
It is berdan-primed, so don't attempt to reload it in the conventional manner (ie. as you would boxer-primed brass). Berdan primers aren't generally available for these cases.
 
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This is Swedish ammo commonly known as 6.5x55mm. It is perfectly suited for the M38/94/96 Mausers, the Ljungman AG-42b and many other commercial rifles chambered in the 6.5x55mm (Ruger m77, etc.).
It is berdan-primed, so don't attempt to reload it in the conventional manner (ie. as you would boxer-primed brass). Berdan primers aren't generally available for these cases.

This would function fine in older Swedish Mausers and in modern commercial guns, but this isn't optimized for those guns. Different twist rates. So, might be a waste to shoot a whole box of these through an older or commercial gun unless the gun "likes" the ammo.
 

NavelOfficer

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My level of marksmanship doesn't make it matter that much, but I see your point.
I don't shoot a Ljungman, do you? Is there a problem brewing reloads that shoot on par with the m41 ammo in the AG-42b?
 

Hamel

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Hate to resurrect an old thread but found 30 ish rounds in my stash. Don't know how I got it, but came across this thread while googling.

Since I have no gun for it I'll probably try to unload it. Any ideas of its worth?
 
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Hate to resurrect an old thread but found 30 ish rounds in my stash. Don't know how I got it, but came across this thread while googling.

Since I have no gun for it I'll probably try to unload it. Any ideas of its worth?

With old vintage ammo, especially unusual and uncommon stuff like 6.5x55, its hard to say. Gunbroker penny auction would be the best way to sell it - if people want it, they'll pay plenty for it, especially now.
 

mac1911

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This would function fine in older Swedish Mausers and in modern commercial guns, but this isn't optimized for those guns. Different twist rates. So, might be a waste to shoot a whole box of these through an older or commercial gun unless the gun "likes" the ammo.
I dont know how farback you have to go to see a change in twist. Swedes where onto something 100+ years ago 120-140 gn 6.5 mm bullets and 1/7ish twist.
Prickskytte - sniper should be some nice stuff.
i wonder if that lot number is correct for dat 01-15
The 6.5 is very popular in competition still in sweden and im sure theres still a good amount of M63 swede match rifles in use?
Or the Scandinavians Target Rifle , 200 STR by SIG?

i would toss it on the shelf, probably get $1 round easy though.
 
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I dont know how farback you have to go to see a change in twist. Swedes where onto something 100+ years ago 120-140 gn 6.5 mm bullets and 1/7ish twist.
Prickskytte - sniper should be some nice stuff.
i wonder if that lot number is correct for dat 01-15
The 6.5 is very popular in competition still in sweden and im sure theres still a good amount of M63 swede match rifles in use?

My take on this is that the Swedish bolt guns were optimized to shoot long, bottlenosed bullets, and the Ljungman was designed to shoot spitzers. This ammo isn't common, so using this as plinking ammo for a bolt gun designed to shoot bottlenosed bullets is sort of like using 93 gas in a pickup truck - yeah, you can, but why?
 

mac1911

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My take on this is that the Swedish bolt guns were optimized to shoot long, bottlenosed bullets, and the Ljungman was designed to shoot spitzers. This ammo isn't common, so using this as plinking ammo for a bolt gun designed to shoot bottlenosed bullets is sort of like using 93 gas in a pickup truck - yeah, you can, but why?
Eh the old swedes like the pointy bullets too. Even the mile long jump to the lands.
That ammo posted been in production since early 40s Im not sure how rare that particular box is but I would not hesitate to run that in any 6.5 swede rifle
 

45BPCR

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Back in the day, Samco was selling that in sealed battle packs.
The problem was, the cardboard boxes the cartridges were packed in tarnished the cases.
It works very well in an M-96.
It works just as well in an AG-42B, you just have to oil the cases before you fire them.
Funny huh?

Here's a PDF for the AG-42b


It'll shoot to the sights of any M-96 or AG-42B and the sights are calibrated for " torped" (spitzer) ammo.
It's extremely accurate ammo, kinda along the the lines of GP-11 for the Swiss rifles.
If you look closely you can see the reddish color on the cases.
I have 3 30cal ammo cans of it I'd like to pass on.
C
 

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