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.45 ACP case gauging question...

Paleoman

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Hi,

I had previously created different loads for Berry's 230 gr RN plated .45 ACP bullets and had settled on a load that I think would give the best results for my S&W 1911. The rounds I had made during all the testing (over 100) all gauged fine. The OAL I have is ~1.258" (Hornady book showed 1.275, Hodgdon book showed 1.200", and factory remington rounds are 1.257", granted a slightly different shape to them).

So, I decided to create a large batch of rounds (300). I checked OAL during production, and they were all 1.257-1.259" (I think some depended upon whether I have the press stations fully loaded - Dillon 650). I case gauge checked every round and I saw a few things that I have questions on.

First, there were 12 rounds that did not totally drop into the case gauge. Ten of them stuck out just a tiny amount (I didn't measure, but probably 0.01", compared to ones I measured later that were sticking out more) and I would have to push them in so the back was flush with the gauge. It would take a tiny bit a pressure on the nose of the bullet to get them out. The rest of the bullets just dropped in.

Any thoughts on why I'm seeing some variation in seating? I was very careful, once I saw this happen in the first 50 rounds, to make sure I had a complete stroke on the press handle.

What I did at the end of the run, was run these through the seating die position (no other stations loaded) and then they almost all, just dropped into the case gauge. I probably had 2 that still were a tiny bit raised, but it was very close. Think they'll be fine as well?

I had 2 rounds that stuck up a noticeable amount from the back of the gauge. One was 0.026" and one 0.035". I tried running them through the reseat and recrimp stations, but they were still sticking out. I pulled the bullets from the case, and dropped the case in the gauge and it still sticks out. Is the case too long, or maybe some ding on the rim that is causing it not to seat right? Checking one case, it was 0.891" long, and 0.471" near mouth and 0.474" at widest part. All seem to be within spec. Do I just chalk these up to bad cases?

Lsatly, I'm wondering about the crimping. I had to take apart some bullets I had made, and I do see some crimping lines. Here is a shot of three bullets removed from the cases, and then one new bullet (on left).

untitled-174605.jpg

Is this amount of crimp on these OK?

Thanks in advance!
 

Paleoman

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I'm using the Dillon .45 taper crimp die. I'm wondering if I'm crimping too much, and if that would cause a problem with the case gauge. The majority of the rounds gauge fine.
 

Fixxah

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Check the rim for a burr. Some guns leave a noticeable impression and subsequent burr. Only crimp enough to straighten out the bell you made when you expanded the case. 1911 headspaces on the extractor iirc. I use a dillen case gauge as they are accurate saami dimensions. Not a fan of LE Wilson gauges myself. Make the round as long as magazine allows to feed reliably. Enjoy.

Edit: I have a lee push through setup which sizes the cometed case. Then I tumble the ammo for a nice shine.
 

NavelOfficer

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Insert the case head-first and you'll see if the rim is deformed. If it drops in slightly, you should be good to go.
If it's still high when inserted mouth-first, you have other issues to determine.
 

Paleoman

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Insert the case head-first and you'll see if the rim is deformed. If it drops in slightly, you should be good to go.
If it's still high when inserted mouth-first, you have other issues to determine.
Thanks. Tried head first and the case would not go in. Close inspection of the rim shows a nick that stuck out some.

57c99a829c60c5958b0895a513580600.jpg


sent from my phone.
 

Dadstoys

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I find that .45 semi's are rough on the cases.
Out of the last 500 I ran, I had about 15 rejects where the rim was too geeked to salvage.
 

Paleoman

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Does the crimping shown in my photo appear too excessive? It leaves a mark on the bullet, but is really small.

sent from my phone.
 

Paleoman

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As currently set, yes, for the most part. As mentioned origionally, Of 300 rounds, I had 10 that didn't gauge and I recrimped and they were mostly ok(a few stuck a tiny bit). Two would not gauge and I found nicks on the rim. It's possible that some of the 10 had less than perfect rims.

All the rest dropped right into the gauge. It's just that, having to pull some apart, I did notice the crimp marks.

I'll try backing off and adjusting the crimp, so that future rounds will have less marks.

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 
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No, I mean do those rounds that fail the case gage plunk and spin in your barrel? Case gages are tighter than barrels, so you may be fine. I own a useless Midway 10mm case gage (that I no longer use because the tool marks internally are horrible, and I think it's out of spec) -- I just use my barrel.

Your crimp depth looks a hair deeper than I do with plated bullets, but it's not going to cause a problem IMO.
 
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Paleoman

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No, I mean do those rounds that fail the case gage plunk and spin in your barrel? Case gages are tighter than barrels, so you may be fine. I own a useless Midway 10mm case gage (that I no longer use because the tool marks internally are horrible, and I think it's out of spec) -- I just use my barrel.

Your crimp depth looks a hair deeper than I do with plated bullets, but it's not going to cause a problem IMO.
Ah. Gotcha. I didn't try that with the 10. Good idea though. Thanks.


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Michael J. Spangler

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Try measuring the case mouth on a crimped round
Bullet diameter plus double the thickness (each side of the case) of the brass
.451" plus .010" plus .010" is 471.
Don't exceed that. You can damage the bullet plating and even undersize the bullet enough to get tumbling or leading with lead bullets.
 

Paleoman

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OK. I backed out the crimping die, and brought it down with a raised platform, until it touched the bullet. I then turned the die by 1/8 turns and crimped, with arechec at the case gauge, after each change. It started going in a bit, to the case gauge, and then almost halfway, and finally dropped right in. Here is a picture from my phone (a bit blurry), but I think you can see the taper on the left is less than the one on the right:

http://media.michali.net/media/36/388/reloads-133655.jpg

I'll use that forward going.

Thanks for the tips/suggestions everyone!
 
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