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Mystery ship washes ashore in Alabama after Hurricane Ike

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by packingungal, Sep 20, 2008.

  1. packingungal

    packingungal Member

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    http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/09/19/ike.mystery.ship.ap/index.html

    video:http://www.ireport.com/docs/DOC-87554

    FORT MORGAN, Alabama (AP) -- When the waves from Hurricane Ike receded, they left behind a mystery: a ragged shipwreck that archeologists say could be a two-masted Civil War schooner that ran aground in 1862 or another ship from 70 years later.


    A ragged boat from 1862 or 1933 washed ashore in Fort Morgan, Alabama, after Hurricane Ike.

    The wreck, about 6 miles from Fort Morgan, had been partially uncovered when Hurricane Camille cleared away sand in 1969.

    Researchers at the time identified it as the Monticello, a battleship that partially burned when it crashed trying to get past the U.S. Navy and into Mobile Bay during the Civil War.

    After examining photos of the wreck post-Ike, Museum of Mobile marine archaeologist Shea McLean agreed that it is probably the Monticello, which ran aground in 1862 after sailing from Havana, Cuba, according to Navy records.

    "Based on what we know of ships lost in that area and what I've seen, the Monticello is by far the most likely candidate," McLean said. "You can never be 100 percent certain unless you find the bell with 'Monticello' on it, but this definitely fits."

    Fort Morgan was used as Union forces attacked in 1864 during the Battle of Mobile Bay.

    Other clues indicate that it could be an early 20th-century schooner that ran aground on the Alabama coast in 1933.

    The wrecked ship is 136.9 feet long and 25 feet wide, according to Mike Bailey, site curator at Fort Morgan, who examined it this week. The Monticello was listed in shipping records as 136 feet long, McLean told the Press-Register of Mobile.

    He said the wreckage appears to have components, such as steel cables, that would point to the Rachel rather than an 1860s schooner.

    Glenn Forest, another archaeologist who examined the wreck, said a full identification would require an excavation.

    "It's a valuable artifact," he said. "They need to get this thing inside before it falls apart or another storm comes along and sends it through those houses there like a bowling ball." iReport.com: See a closer look at the remains of the ship

    Meanwhile, curious beach-goers have been drawn to the remains of the wooden hull filled with rusted iron fittings.

    "It's interesting, I can tell you that," Terri Williams said. "I've lived down here most of my life, and I've never seen anything like this, and it's been right here."
     
  2. Scrivener

    Scrivener Banned

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    What crap. The term "battleship" hadn't even come into use then.

    IF it is the Monticello, it was a blockade runner - hardly a warship.
     
  3. theGringo

    theGringo Member

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    Ride, captain ride
    Upon your mystery ship,
    Be amazed at the friends
    You have here on your trip.
    [grin]
     
  4. packingungal

    packingungal Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  5. RIFLEMAN1000

    RIFLEMAN1000 Member

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    Kinda reminds me of when the hull of the HMS Somerset used to show itself though all the sand at outer beach in Provincetown MA. Used to be pretty cool until some moron lit what was left of the hull on fire . All the main timbers for the keel had HMS Somerset Carved of them with the date the ship was built. I think she sank in 1778 or 1779.
     

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