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new guy

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I've seen the p-bomb dropped alot lately on the forum.

Only when deserved, speaking for myself anyway.

Do you have a non-belt buckle citation for the term having its origins in that acronym? Everything I've read is less complimentary, which would make sense since it's not exactly a term of endearment. Not trolling, just genuinely curious about the etymology.
 
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Only when deserved, speaking for myself anyway.

Do you have a non-belt buckle citation for the term having its origins in that acronym? Everything I've read is less complimentary, which would make sense since it's not exactly a term of endearment. Not trolling, just genuinely curious about the etymology.
image.jpgI'm curious also.
 

BattleSnail

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that's just a made up belt buckle by someone trying to reclaim a pejorative and spin it into a positive. That's not even remotely close to where the term comes from. On the officers.com forum, one explained it as, and it seems quite plausible:

PIG: If you thought the term pig arose in the 1960s, you're in for a surprise. The Oxford English Dictionary cites an 1811 reference to a "pig" as a Bow Street Runner--the early police force, named after the location of their headquarters, before Sir Robert Peel and the Metropolitan Police Force. Before that, the term "pig" had been used as early as the mid-1500s to refer to a person who is heartily disliked. The usage was probably confined to the criminal classes until the 1960s, when it was taken up by protestors. False explanations for the term involve the gas masks worn by the riot police in that era, or the pigs in charge of George Orwell's Animal Farm.
 
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