2 Gun match - things I learned this past weekend.

allen-1

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Let's start with "I'm reasonably competent with a pistol, not so much with a rifle" - just to get that out of the way.

I shot a two gun match this past weekend, a Sua Sponte fundraiser. I've only shot one multigun match before. I read the stage descriptions and the accompanying match brief carefully, but I expected to learn some stuff as I went along by watching better shooters. That turned out to be true.

Lesson #1 -
Although you CAN zero an AR-15 at either 20 or 50 yards - only a dumbass would zero his AR at 50 when his scope is designed for a 20/200 yard zero.
I had a nice grouping on my sight-in paper, and shot the 300 yard targets on our long range,
but in the match I was shooting way over the target at 100 yards and had to walk the rounds up to hit the steel.
Missed shots and time - LOTS of time.

Lesson #2 -
If you're missing the long shots, cut your losses and go get the pistol shots instead of parring out.

Lesson #3 -
Practice more.
I can clearly see on video me bringing the rifle up on target, then lowering it to flip the safety off;
that safety should have come off as soon as I was raising the rifle to shoot.
I generally shoot my handgun at least twice a week at the range, plus dryfire at home.
I don't do that with the AR. If I want to do better with it, I need to work with it more.
 
Have fun.

I biggest opportunity i see is people knowing their holds and when to make adjustments for the stage planning.

I normally do a 25 yard zero on my offset rmr and know where to hold for close shots

Then I adjust my elevation turrets for the stage or use the mini Christmas tree reticle for holds out the 250 yards+ for longer shoots depending on the stages.

It’s a blast but does get expensive pretty quick.
 
Over thinking.

Done a few defensive rifle shoots and 3-guns. Know your zero and hold over from 7 yards to 300. If you are shooting a 5.56 it’s not hard.

I’ve shot courses from the above (7-300) with me just knowing how to adjust. It’s not a a lot of bullet drop.
 
What optic are you using?
Vortex strike eagle. 1-6x24

Checked mounting hardware and plumb yesterday. Going to range today (hopefully) to bench and see what’s going on.

Re-read manuals yesterday - and zeroing at 50 for 20/200 WAS correct. So I have no idea what the problem is. Strongly suspect that it’s the equivalent of PEBCAK.
 
The biggest lesson I learned about 2-gun is that it’s one gun too many for me. I can shoot a pistol match, shotgun match, or rifle match. When I try to combine them everything goes to crap.
 
I zero at 36yd and just put the dot on the target, anything close the dot goes a few inches high. Works out well for me.
 
Vortex strike eagle. 1-6x24

Checked mounting hardware and plumb yesterday. Going to range today (hopefully) to bench and see what’s going on.

Re-read manuals yesterday - and zeroing at 50 for 20/200 WAS correct. So I have no idea what the problem is. Strongly suspect that it’s the equivalent of PEBCAK.
Ammo can make a difference, if you are using heavy bullets. It is always best to zero at the farthest distance you can. With that scope if you have a 300 yard range, make use of it to zero the 300 yard dot. Knowing your velocity with the ballistic coefficient for the bullet can give you an alternative.
 
Hi. Going to try 2 gun. Are there rules on what guns and gear can be used?
Yes. Check with the match and find out what rules they are running the match under.
How many mags do I need on my belt?
Check the rules to find out how many they allow and how many targets there may be on a stage.
 
Yes. Check with the match and find out what rules they are running the match under.

Check the rules to find out how many they allow and how many targets there may be on a stage.
You can see my posts on Tritown and the USPSA thread. I think this is mainly a Practiscore issue that will get fixed. With Practiscore, it's very hard to figure out who and how to contact for a match you see listed. Especially if the match is right around the corner. And especially with multigun, every single club is going off different rules. Go on Practiscore right now and find 10 two or three gun matches and look for divisions. Something like "tactical optics" could literally mean (if they list it somewhere) Pistol with irons, shotgun with bead, rifle with optics. Pistol with optics, shotgun with optics, rifle with irons, etc.. etc... Some even have "Tactical Optics" that's it, then you go find a three year old facebook post where they ran what looks like the same match and they wrote "Tactical optics: Red dot pistol, red dot rifle, competitor must carry all gear for the day on person at all times and a plate carrier".

But, especially after having run and help run matches for over a decade, can't really "fault" anyone, just have to do some digging, or do what I did at Tritown, showed up with all my chokes, a pistol with irons, birdshot of multiple sizes and enough slugs for a slugs stage. Then while there realize there's technically 1, maybe 2 guys who ran the entire match, did all the setup the day before, did most the breakdown and didn't even shoot it themselves. He even said "I will never cancel a match, I drive all the way down here just thinking about how much fun this will be for you guys"
 
The Tri-Town match was a great match. It was my first time at that club, and first 2-gun match. The guys that ran it were very nice, fair, and worked hard just so we could have a good time.

I’ll be checking out more of their matches next season for sure.
 
The Tri-Town match was a great match. It was my first time at that club, and first 2-gun match. The guys that ran it were very nice, fair, and worked hard just so we could have a good time.

I’ll be checking out more of their matches next season for sure.
Tritown puts a good match if it’s the ri one. Couple years back we shot. It was challenging for sure not for the beginner.
 
Yeah.....I'm going to have to have that explained to me.
Reticles are often designed for use with a particular zero. If you use that zero, then hash marks get you on target at a particular distance. For example, the JM1 reticle is designed for use with a 200 yard zero. The hash marks will then be on target (or close enough) at 300, 400, 500, and 600 yards. https://vortexeesti.ee/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/web_man_rfl_razor-hd_jm-1.pdf

This reticle allows you to hit targets at various ranges without adjusting the scope elevation turret. No, it likely won’t be as accurate as twiddling the elevation turret, but it will be much faster and close enough.

tldr: if you have a scope with a bullet drop reticle, read the instructions to see what zero it was intended for, then confirm by shooting.
 
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