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  1. #1
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    Default Colt 6920 Carbine Trigger

    I went to the range for a bit today with my 6920... and the trigger felt like crap. All that has been done to it is a light polishing on contact surfaces (no material removal). It has a heavy dragging pull to it, then breaks when you wouldn't expect. I didn't seem to have this problem before. I did put grease on the contact surfaces last time I had it apart... is this a bad idea for an AR trigger?

    I'm considering getting a 2-stage for this gun instead of what's in it, even though I wanted to keep it all stock.

  2. #2
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    I am replacing my 6920 trigger. It's not worth the effort in my opinion to attempt to make it less shitty.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by derek View Post
    I am replacing my 6920 trigger. It's not worth the effort in my opinion to attempt to make it less shitty.
    At least I know I'm not the only one that is less than thrilled with it. I have a white oak-tuned RRA trigger in a full length AR that feels nice. Might go with another of those.

  4. #4

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    Now, the question of the day is... does Colt still have their whole "proprietary trigger pin holes" thing going, like my old Colt does?

    -Mike

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by drgrant View Post
    Now, the question of the day is... does Colt still have their whole "proprietary trigger pin holes" thing going, like my old Colt does?

    -Mike
    Doesn't matter, they have an option for "large pin colt" models!

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by TomH View Post
    Doesn't matter, they have an option for "large pin colt" models!
    Hmmm.... me wants... how much does that cost?

    -Mike

  7. #7
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    WOA Catalog PDF

    Looks like $135 for the large pin version. RRA sells the triggers for $120 on their site so with the tuning done also it seems like a nice deal. The one I have feels smooth but I haven't tried any of the more fancy types like geissele. I wouldn't really want one with adjustable parts and a 5 oz trigger anyway.
    Last edited by TomH; 10-25-2009 at 09:19 PM.

  8. #8

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    Here are two large-pin trigger kits at Brownells. I have used both. The JP is a very nice single stage, while the Geissele trigger is a refined, precise 2-stage. If you have a sear block you may need to do a little machining or dremmel work prior to installation, and even then some fitting of the safety/trigger engagement may be necessary. I have installed one of each of Geissele and JP in Colt large-pin lowers, both with sear blocks, and both function perfectly.


  9. #9
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    This might be good to add: this would be my SHTF rifle, I have an optic and buis mounted on it. I want it to be a no-fuss always goes bang rifle. But I don't want a cruddy trigger either of course. Is there any reason a 2-stage wouldn't serve well for this purpose?

  10. #10

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    I have ARs with stock triggers, a JP, and a few Geissele's. Just looking carefully at the trigger / hammer / disconnector setup of each of them I don't see any obvious reason why one might fail faster than another. The only trigger related malfunction I have ever experienced came from a blown primer being jammed under the trigger and that happened with a standard trigger.

    The best answer would come from a nice large-sample scientific test, and my few data points are not worth much. But speaking for myself, I don't worry about any of these triggers failing faster than another due to some weakness inherent to their design.

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