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  1. #21
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    Some very good training articles by JP O'Connor can be accessed on the Pilkguns webpage.

    B

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Supermoto View Post


    If you get into the box with anxiety, then your fear is dictating your shooting.
    Of which we have very little control over and what training and experience counters. Over time, with training and practice, performance anxiety is reduced, but it's the norm for most people, at least in my experience. As your experience and confidence grows, your anxiety is reduced. Clearly some are more prone then others with personality types and other factors playing their Murphy factor roles.

  3. #23
    NES Member Supermoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Brink View Post
    Of which we have very little control over and what training and experience counters. Over time, with training and practice, performance anxiety is reduced, but it's the norm for most people, at least in my experience. As your experience and confidence grows, your anxiety is reduced. Clearly some are more prone then others with personality types and other factors playing their Murphy factor roles.

    You have a lot of control over it. It goes away because you eventually learn how to deal with it. Think how much further you could progress if you learn how to control anxiety from the beginning .

    Know your skill level and execute your plan. No anxiety involved.
    Not knowing will cause anxiety

    I'm not saying that all you need is confidence to shoot well, but it removes a major stumbling block others deal with. Your mental game will always out perform your skill, either in the positive or negative

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Supermoto View Post
    You have a lot of control over it. It goes away because you eventually learn how to deal with it.
    Ergo, due to experience and practice that you learn to deal with it. The control you have is getting out there and doing it, but you can't will it away.

  5. #25
    NES Member GTOShootr's Avatar
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    I still get as much of the butterflies as I did when I started but instead of triggering a sweat or a shaky hand, it triggers a wake up call to relax and execute the tasks at hand. I don't think of trying for a personal best or whatever. You're not magically going to add to your repertoire while on the line. That's for practice and learning from what you've done wrong in past matches. Build a tool box of skills with a familiar comfort level attached and bring it to the match to apply it with consistency.

  6. #26
    NES Member Supermoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTOShootr View Post
    I still get as much of the butterflies as I did when I started but instead of triggering a sweat or a shaky hand, it triggers a wake up call to relax and execute the tasks at hand. I don't think of trying for a personal best or whatever. You're not magically going to add to your repertoire while on the line. That's for practice and learning from what you've done wrong in past matches. Build a tool box of skills with a familiar comfort level attached and bring it to the match to apply it with consistency.
    As much as it pains me to say, the above is why Steve has a very strong mental games. You are not going to learn any new skills when the buzzer goes of, you only can execute on what you have. You are not going to learn how to shoot steel on the move or how to overcome anxiety when you step in the box.

    Experience will teach you that you need to invest time into your mental game, as your skill increases, so does the stress of shooting, people expecting you to win, time and money invested, sponsorships etc all weigh alot heavier. you can learn it now or fight through it later

  7. #27

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    The mental game is the hardest of all the things you will learn in the shooting sports and it's the one thing most of us don't practice. There is a great book by Saul Kirsh named Mastering the Mental Game that is great and goes over all the details of match stress. The advice in this book opened my eyes and has helped me a ton. It helped me channel the nervous tension into performance tension. I still get nervous when I compete but I'm better able to deal with match stress.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelena View Post
    I noticed that I always do a lot better at practice that at the match. I am trying to take it just as shooting for fun and not for competing, however, when other people shoot with me, I can't achieve a good concentration and thus do worse than if I shoot alone.
    Anyone else has this problem? And what do you do to overcome it?
    You have discovered that competitive pistol shooting, like golf, is a game in which your primary opponent is yourself.

    You ask, has anyone else had the same experience? The question is: has anyone else not had the same experience.

    While it may not be of much comfort, I'll offer two observations. First, with time, the effect will diminish (but not go away altogether), as you begin to accept that "There's always another match." Second, years ago I learned to quit looking at the spotting scope after finishing with the sighters.

  9. #29

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    Compete with PistolPete and Supermoto! Two things- they will rib you all day long for shooting a plastic gun- that will make you mentally tough.
    And when you even think for a sec that you can shoot as well/fast as them with their open guns... just smile inside and hope you can do it in half the speed with your production gun! .. that will make you mentally tough.

    Seriously- we're all human. I too can feel my heart beat hard on my first stage at every match. I must say though... I thrive for the competition. Without it.. I'd be bored to death. That being said sometimes things go to hell at matches sometimes... when I F up at a match I try to focus more on my weakness. Make your weakness your strength. Look forward to it next time.

    Practice at 100+%.... don't try this in a match... shoot at 90-95%. You can't afford to get wreckless at a match but in a practice push hard.

    Not sure what shooting you do but I'd imagine this applies to most activities...

    Mental... read With Winning in Mind... good stuff. Visualize good things happening... before you even get to the match!
    Last edited by Lugnut; 10-28-2008 at 10:12 PM.

  10. #30
    NES Member Supermoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lugnut View Post
    when I F up at a match I try to focus more on my weakness. Make your weakness your strength. Look forward to it next time.

    Practice at 100+%.... don't try this in a match... shoot at 90-95%. You can't afford to get wreckless at a match but in a practice push hard.
    Make sure you focus on your weakness after the match is over not during


    I wouldn't practice at 100% alot , you make to many mistakes, you have to practice perfectly, or you will start engraining bad habits. Practice slow, work your way up, then try to push the envelope.


    Also be careful who you practice with.... make sure they share your drive and goals, you need to learn skills not compete against each other. A bad practice will is worse than no practice

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