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  1. #1
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    Default For big dogs owners: symptoms of hemoabdomen

    I decided to write this post because from time to time we see cases of internal bleeding in large dogs at the animal hospital where I work, and many of those dogs are brought to the hispital too late because owners did not recognise the dangerous symptoms early enough. I think every dog owner should de familiar with this problem enough to rush a pet to a vet before it is too late.
    The internal bleeding is most frequently caused by splenic mass, which may be malignant or benign. There are, however, other reasons for it, for example hepatic mass or internal organ laceration caused by blunt abdominal trauma. In any case, if the internal bleeding is suspected, the animal must get veterinary care ASAP.
    Some owners who bring their bleeding dogs to the vets complain about lethargy. For example, they may say: "Oh, he looks so sad today, he does not want to play". Lethargy is surely one of the symptoms of internal bleeding, but there are other thing you can check for at home. Massive blood loose will cause pallor and rapid heartbeat. So, if you noticed that your dog isn't as active as usually, lift his lip and check his gum color, and also tke his pulse rate. If the gums are pale, or if the pulse is rapid, you have a good reason to bring your pet to the emergency hospital right away. If you don't see anything abnormal, but your pet still does not look like himself for you, bring him to the ER anyways. Remember: if this is really an internal bleeding, you may lose your friend very quickly.
    It is better to bring your pet to ER instead of your regular vet, because ER hospitals are staffed with specialists and have necessary equipment. Always know the 24/7 ER vets in your area. On arrival, you will be triaged by a qualified vet technician. Techs do not make diagnosis, but they have skills allowing them to decide whether the pet needs to be seen right away. A technician who works at the ER hospital for a while usually can recognise hemoabdomen in seconds.
    The treatment for hemoabdomen is a surgery. Before that, a vet may do the ultrasound examination to determine the cause of bleeding, and chest radiographs to check for the possible metasthases in lungs, if they suspect a malignant tumor. The surgery normally has a decent outcome, if the animal was brought in early. As in many other problems, the key to a success in treatment of hemoabdomen is an early recognition and prompt diagnosis.

    P.S. The most impressive case of hemoabdomens I had ever seen was a 13-years old Golden who was dead on arrival. The dog was successfully resuscitated, given a blood transfusion, and operated on. It was classified as class 5-c, or 5-catastrophic, as anesthesia case. Nobody beleived it is going to survive. I said that I'm not going to swear for 6 months if this dog will be discharged. The stubborn Golden survived the surgery, survived first 24 hours after the surgery, and was discharged home with improvement. I really did not swear fo 6 months

  2. #2
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    Thanks Yelena:

    Some questions (about my big dog): Besides blood in stool or urine, what else would indicate that your dog was bleeding internally? I know you said Lethargy, but that's sort of a hard one to call unless it's really pronounced and usually it's not something I get concerned about for a day or two?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raoul Duke View Post
    Thanks Yelena:

    Some questions (about my big dog): Besides blood in stool or urine, what else would indicate that your dog was bleeding internally? I know you said Lethargy, but that's sort of a hard one to call unless it's really pronounced and usually it's not something I get concerned about for a day or two?
    There are several kinds of internal bleeding. Presence of coagulated ot bright-red blood in stool or vomit indicates GI bleeding. Blood in urine may be a sign of urinary infection, bladder stones, kidney stones and other diseases. These, of course, are reasons for a visit to ER as well. ANY kind of internal bleeding is. But hemoabdomen means blood in the adbominal cavity, and your dog won't have bloody stool form it. Since this is usually an acute bleeding, you may also lack day or too to observe your pet. Gum coloration is a pretty good indicator, so check your dog's gum color. If your dog has dark gums, see her eyelids. If they are pale, just bring a dog to the vet ASAP.

  4. #4
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    OK

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