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  1. #1
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    Default Oil Burner Temp. Question

    I am mechanically retarded. There, I said it.

    Now for the question. Our house is sixty years old, with what appears to be the original oil burner, which we replaced the engine on five years ago, and as of last years service, was at about eighty percent efficiency.

    I have recently noticed, that the temp. on the burner almost consistently reads around 180, and gives of heat, which, no pun intended, makes our basement in July feel like a furnace. Is this because our hot water tank is heated from the burner? If so, how can I reduce the temp., and will doing so decrease the amount, or temp. of the hot water?

    Thanks,

    Tim

  2. #2
    NES Member Fixxah's Avatar
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    It sounds to me like there is a problem with setup of burner control. I have indirect hot water as well and boiler is set up to be a cold start. Hi/Lo limit settings may require adjustment. It may just be an aquastat issue also. If you have a service contract with oil company have them check it out. These things are finicky sometimes and I don't want to hear you burned house down or worse. Good luck. ...John

  3. #3
    NES Member
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    I turned the temperature down on my hot water heater. I keep it a click or two higher than warm and I get plenty of hot water. As far as your oil burner, sorry, I do not know but I think Mr. Fixxah's suggestion is the best. It is off season so you should be able to get an appointment without too much lag time.
    Best Regards.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Thanks for the suggestions. I am going away for a week, but am making an appt. with my serviceman. The funny thing is, it does go down to 140 or so every once in a while. I hope he can tell me, (remember, he works for the oil company that sells me the oil I burn), how to lower the hot water temp. to burn less oil.

    This winter is going to be very painful for a lot of people with oil.

  5. #5
    NES Member CRSIII's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timbob1 View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions. I am going away for a week, but am making an appt. with my serviceman. The funny thing is, it does go down to 140 or so every once in a while. I hope he can tell me, (remember, he works for the oil company that sells me the oil I burn), how to lower the hot water temp. to burn less oil.

    This winter is going to be very painful for a lot of people with oil.
    This is a very astute observation.

    It is not in their best interest to make sure your boiler is running at peak performance.

    I use a HVAC co. to service mine.
    Just call me Carl.



    I started with nothing, I still have most of it left.

    Some people will bitch because the sun came up.

  6. #6
    NES Member GaryO's Avatar
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    Better to be safe on water temp especially if you have children, you don't want them to get scalded. The 180 degree water is the correct tempature for a baseboard hot water heating system. You should have a seperate control for your domestic hot water. A good website is http://heatinghelp.com. It is set up for tradesman but if you post a question you will get answers from pros.

  7. #7
    NES Member TY43215's Avatar
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    I work on these things and have for a long time.

    Your boiler maintains a minimum temp in order to produce hot water for domestic use. The domestic water runs through a tankless copper coil that is immersed in the boiler heating water. The copper is heated from the boiler water and transfers heat to the domestic water as it passes through.

    After the water passes through the coil it is mixed with cold in a tempering valve to give you proper temperature domestic hot water.

    Turning down the minimum temp on the aquastat may or may not save you fuel. Turning down the minimum temp may make it so you constantly run out of hot water.

    If you want to save money on oil, hire an independent service person (like me) to tune your system but be prepared for recommendations that cost money if you truly want to save oil.

    I gave one forum member my best advice on a new boiler and he went with it. (I don't travel too far so I just gave advice) He is burning less oil and has better heat and hot water.

    If you want advice send me an e mail. It is worth what you pay for it.

    One addition, no boiler should be set for cold start. They should all maintain at least 100 degrees to keep them warm and efficient. An oil system and an indirect using cold start will cool the indirect with the cold boiler water before it heats which makes it run longer and makes it burn more oil.

  8. #8
    NES Member Jamie's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=CRSIII;517322]This is a very astute observation.

    It is not in their best interest to make sure your boiler is running at peak performance.

    [QUOTE]

    Actually it is in our best interest to keep a system running well. Service calls are not the money maker unless you are an independant and that's all you do. It's tough to tune a boiler to run inefficiently and still avoid a service call soon afterwards.

    Jamie
    Formerly known as HardJeepGuy

    When you get outraged enough, grab your rifle and head outside. If you're the only one there, it's not time yet.

    I wish my lawn was emo so it would cut itself.

  9. #9
    NES Member tele_mark's Avatar
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    Allow me Gary

    You aren't retarded, Timbbob, your heating system is. Point one, it's a high mass system, so everytime it starts up, you have to burn massive amounts of oil to heat all that metal before you can even start heaing the boiler water to do something useful. Also, you have a huge amount of water in that boiler that has to be heated before it starts working for you. You also have a huge amount of waste heat going up the chimney -- the typical chimney temp out the burner is usually in excess of 600 degrees. And, your system has to maintain itself at 180 degrees all the time, 24/7, because it is high mass, a little like idling your car 24/7 in case you want to go to the store.

    This is the system RGS told me about: System2000. I was skeptical at first, but researched it and it indeed overcomes all the points I mention above. I had one installed this time last year, and didn't notify my oil company, who I'm on auto delivery with. When they finally topped me off in 12/07, they were going by the calculations on my old, conventional boiler. I called them after the delivery and asked them what they expected to leave me. They told me I should have 1/4 of a tank left. I had used 1/4 of a tank.

    I don't work for Energy Kinetics, although I've seriously thought about changing careers and selling their systems, but I can't say enough about this setup. If you're in the position to do so, I highly recommend considering purchasing one of these systems.
    Last edited by tele_mark; 07-05-2008 at 07:49 PM.
    The NES REP system is about as ghey as Facebook

  10. #10
    NES Member Patriot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tele_mark View Post
    Allow me Gary

    You aren't retarded, Timbbob, your heating system is. Point one, it's a high mass system, so everytime it starts up, you have to burn massive amounts of oil to heat all that metal before you can even start heaing the boiler water to do something useful. Also, you have a huge amount of water in that boiler that has to be heated before it starts working for you. You also have a huge amount of waste heat going up the chimney -- the typical chimney temp out the burner is usually in excess of 600 degrees. And, your system has to maintain itself at 180 degrees all the time, 24/7, because it is high mass, a little like idling your car 24/7 in case you want to go to the store.

    This is the system RGS told me about: System2000. I was skeptical at first, but researched it and it indeed overcomes all the points I mention above. I had one installed this time last year, and didn't notify my oil company, who I'm on auto delivery with. When they finally topped me off in 12/07, they were going by the calculations on my old, conventional boiler. I called them after the delivery and asked them what they expected to leave me. They told me I should have 1/4 of a tank left. I had used 1/4 of a tank.

    I don't work for Energy Kinetics, although I've seriously thought about changing careers and selling their systems, but I can't say enough about this setup. If you're in the position to do so, I highly recommend considering purchasing one of these systems.
    What is the bottom line ($) on your setup and what options did you get? Who installed it?
    Who maintains it? Any installation issues? What time of year did you install it? How large
    is your tank?
    "Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery."
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