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  1. #11
    Consigliere EddieCoyle's Avatar
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    How does the finished ammo look? If it is noticeably "hourglass" shaped, and/or if the finished cartridges aren't perfectly symmetrical - in other words, bullets look like they're offset a bit inside the case - it's possible that your die is out of spec (too small).

    Longer cases do take more force to form than short cases (especially 9mm). Maybe what you're experiencing is normal.
    The next NRA Basic Metallic Cartridge Reloading class will be Saturday January 31, 2015 at GOAL Headquarters in Northboro, MA More Info Here...

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  2. #12
    NES Member tele_mark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bugs100 View Post
    It's a brand new Hornady carbide sizing die with a gold colored ring inside. The press runs fine except when I'm using the depriming/sizing die. The ram gets a real lot of resistance as soon as I start the ram up.

    I've taken the die out a few times ad reset it. I think I'm going to take it out again and just reset it again with the die as high as it can go with the pin run out to it's maxuim length again and trying that one more time.
    I wonder if you got a defective die without the carbide insert? I know I was having a hell of a time loading .500S&W for Mr.Twigg with non-carbide dies, even with lube.

  3. #13
    NES Member The Goose's Avatar
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    I have just upgraded to a Dillon 550, but even with my previous turret press or single stage I set up a seperate de-priming station. I picked up a cheap Lee press for $21.00 at Midway and a Lee universal decapping die. I bolted it to a seperate bench and drilled a hole through the bench and hung a plastic pail under the hole. After I clean my used brass I decap, inspect, clean the primer hole as needed and store. I just like having this as a seperate step. The cheap press works just fine for the purpose and when I am ready to reload I have plenty of clean and ready brass.

  4. #14

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    The funny thing about it is, resizing brass in my mind is a little over rated. In the long run the way I look at most of the pistol brass is just going to go through a lee fcd in the end any way.

    Also use brass is fireformed any way, if it ejects from a chamber it must fit back in to it. Loading every case by hand you also get a quick look at them also to check to see if their dinged, dented or out of round.

    I think Goose has a good Idea I think in the long run the way he has it set up it so it would be easier to deprime a couple of thousand pices to have ready.

  5. #15
    Consigliere EddieCoyle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bugs100 View Post
    The funny thing about it is, resizing brass in my mind is a little over rated. In the long run the way I look at most of the pistol brass is just going to go through a lee fcd in the end any way.

    Also use brass is fireformed any way, if it ejects from a chamber it must fit back in to it. Loading every case by hand you also get a quick look at them also to check to see if their dinged, dented or out of round.

    I think Goose has a good Idea I think in the long run the way he has it set up it so it would be easier to deprime a couple of thousand pices to have ready.
    No offense Bugs, but before you load another round, you should read the beginning chapters in the ABC's of Reloading or some other such book. Look for the parts about why you need to do certain steps.

    Resizing is extremely important!!
    Try seating a bullet in a fired case. You can push it right in with little effort. You can then crimp with a FCD until your fingers bleed and if you're lucky you'll end up with an inaccurate round. If you're unlucky, the resulting setback from a too-loose bullet will cause the pressure to spike high enough to blow up you and your gun.

    You are not resizing simply to make the round fit your gun. Resizing ensures that the case will hold a bullet with the proper amount of tension. If you don't resize, recoil will cause the bullets in the magazine/cylinder to slide (way) into the case (this is called setback). Especially on autoloader rounds, the crimp alone will not hold the bullet.

    From what you've been saying, "depriming" is not the issue here. It takes very little force to remove a primer from a case. In addition, that force is being brought to bear near the end of the ram travel where the press's mechanical advantage (leverage) is at it's peak.

    If you want to see what I mean, size a case with the die the way it is now, then remove the decapping pin and run another one through. I doubt you'll notice a difference.

    By depriming first, all you're doing is creating an extra step. The various "universal decapping dies" that only remove the primers don't resize.

    If you'd like, PM me and you can stop by my place and try out the dies in my press, or I can come to your place and try it to see if I think the force required is excessive.

    It is harder to resize big long rounds, if the finished ammo looks/shoot OK, maybe what you're experiencing is normal.
    The next NRA Basic Metallic Cartridge Reloading class will be Saturday January 31, 2015 at GOAL Headquarters in Northboro, MA More Info Here...

    Never rat on your friends, and always keep your mouth shut.

  6. #16
    NES Member The Goose's Avatar
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    I always resize. So although seperate depriming does add a step it works for me. It is just all part of the rotation. +1 on the ABC's of Reloading, it was my first book on reloading and I keep re-reading it. That and the Lyman manual.

  7. #17
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    Bugs,
    Something is out of whack with your setup.
    I size .44 mag, .45 Colt, .357 Mag and many other pistol calibers on a crappy old single linkage Lyman turret press and they come out of the die with no undo force.
    Two fingers on the handle should be able to raise the handle to extract the case.
    I use Lee carbide dies for many calibers and have never lubed a pistol case.
    The sizing die, either carbide or steel, should always be adjusted to just touch the shellholder or shell plate in a progressive press.
    Perhaps one of the members who lives nearby could check out the problem with you.

    Jack

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Goose View Post
    I set up a seperate de-priming station. I picked up a cheap Lee press for $21.00 at Midway and a Lee universal decapping die. I bolted it to a seperate bench and drilled a hole through the bench and hung a plastic pail under the hole.
    +1 except I nailed an applesauce lid (with a hole in it) to the bottom of the bench and then just screwed the jar onto the lid. I also deprime dirty and then clean afterwards so that the pocket gets cleaned

  9. #19
    Shooting at the big range in heaven
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    The only other thing I can think of is to start lubing all these calibers but due to the volume of cases that I like to do at once I would think that's more costly, trouble and time consuming than using a single stage to do this. Also I don't think it would make it that much easier.---Bugs100
    Case lube is a wonderful thing! Use it correctly and you can lube several hundred cases in a few seconds. Wait a couple of minutes for it to dry and you're golden.

    Don't waste your time resizing with a single stage press or by not lubing your cases at all.


    Respectfully,

    jkelly

  10. #20

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    Well I'm sorry about the rant about resizing but the frustration over the series of events with these resizing dies is clouding my judgement.

    The first die a Lee was broken the nut on the top wouldn't turn and was evidently inserted wrong at the factory and stripped the thread. They were suppose to send me a new one but only sent me a decapping pin and a nut which were useless.

    But I had already ordered a new set of 41 mag dies which came the next day. So I put the die in and the ram wouldn't go up at all. After a hour I found the problem out of a 1000 cleaned cases I had picked the only one which had a 1/2 inch wad of car wax and chrushed walnut media in it. Evidently a drop of the car wax never mixed with the media and some how had gotten into the case attracted the crushed walnut and turned in to concrete.

    So I reset the die again to be sure and started again. The ram handle going up was real real hard but knocked out the primer. But seeing how it was new I figured it was going to get better. 50 hard cases later still the same. One at a time.

    So I took the die out screwed it down to the plate and didn't lower the plate and turn it a 1/8 of turn down this time, I just left it like that. Same thing no difference.

    Now I measure the die and it's fine, just real tight to use.

    So I actually started backed the die and extending the depriming pin each time trying it, untill it was at it's most extended lenght and still knocking out primers. No real difference in ram resistance.

    I'm a real big guy and it takes a lot of real lot of pressure on the ram handle to get it up to it's peak to hear the primer pop out and on the down stroke it's a lot easier but it's not as easy as another caliber like a 357.

    So after a week of screwing around with this I called Hornady. They inform me that since it's a brand new die even though it's carbide I should lube the cases untill the die smoothes out.

    Then he tells me that he really to sure why it's doing it but I'm not the first call about this lately either.

    Also that not only should I lube my all 32-20 cases I should also dip the the rim of the case in powdered graphite even with carbide dies.

    I'm just going to have to start lubing all my cases because the carbide dies arn't as trouble free as they say.


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