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  1. #1
    NES Member
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    Default Anthracite coal here ?

    A friend gave me a clean like-new small Godin coal stove. Not pellet stove style , but a non-electric tube shaped pretty thing. This afternoon I am going to hook it up to a heavy duty steel lined chimney. The idea of coal appeals to me , as it takes up less space than firewood , and burns longer. I like the idea of storing a fuel that is already a million years old and doesn't rot , fall on my wife's foot or or require splitting.

    I am told that anthracite lessons much of the nastiness associated with the reputation of coal , some say a well running anthracite system is about equal in cleanliness to propane ...

    Does anyone know where to buy coal ? I wouldn't mind overpaying retail during the learning curve - and then stocking a metric f-ton of the stuff at a reasonable bulk price.

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    I used to burn coal...I had a hard time finding bulk coal dealers so I would buy it by the bagged ton (actually easier to deal with). At the time, Blue Seal carried it but I know a lot of smaller hardware stores had it too. It was about $4.50 for 50# back a few years ago. With all the crap that's going down in the coal industry, I can imagine that price will only go up and up.

    After my stove finally burned itself out after 20 years of hard use (coal is very acidic), I bought a pellet stove...

  4. #4
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    Are you ready from a visit from the EPA?

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bullseye View Post
    Waiting for them to call me back. Thanks , but I was sort of hoping for real life instead of google-fu.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by fubar View Post
    Waiting for them to call me back. Thanks , but I was sort of hoping for real life instead of google-fu.
    Hopefully Google fu won't call you back, but real life will.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by timbo View Post
    I used to burn coal...I had a hard time finding bulk coal dealers so I would buy it by the bagged ton (actually easier to deal with). At the time, Blue Seal carried it but I know a lot of smaller hardware stores had it too. It was about $4.50 for 50# back a few years ago. With all the crap that's going down in the coal industry, I can imagine that price will only go up and up.

    After my stove finally burned itself out after 20 years of hard use (coal is very acidic), I bought a pellet stove...
    Thank you.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by fubar View Post
    Thank you.
    Not a problem

  9. #9
    NES Member garandman's Avatar
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    A buddy heats his house partially with coal - it's more comfortable than most wood-heated homes I've been in.

    Boston Coal.

    Heating with a coal burning stove stoked with Anthracite Coal can free you from the vagaries of oil pricing. A steady source of dry radiant heat creates a comfortable warm glow in the house. This anthracite coal is a clean burning fuel. When burning Anthracite, no trace of black smoke will be emitted from your chimney once the stove is up to operating temperature.

    Coal vs. Wood
    Compared to wood, coal stoves are better able to get the heat into the room since they are very efficient. Coal burns with more of a constant rate sort of like smoldering in comparison to a wood fire that can flare, coal stack temperatures average well below those of wood stoves. But more heat from the coal goes into the room. Wood stoves burn with about 60% efficiency.

    Compared to wood, coal stoves are better able to get the heat into the room since they are very efficient. Coal burns with more of a constant rate sort of like smoldering in comparison to a wood fire that can flare, coal stack temperatures average well below those of wood stoves. But more heat from the coal goes into the room. Wood stoves burn with about 60% efficiency.

    Though recommended to be shaken down twice daily, unlike wood stoves that must be constantly stoked and banked for the night, most air tight coal stoves will easily run 24 to 30 hours without being re-fueled. (Translation: You will awake to a warm toasty house with the stove still outputting full BTU's!)

    No Creosote buildup. Unlike wood based fuel products, there is no creosote buildup, and thus little risk of a chimney fire. With burning coal there is a reduced need for the chimney cleaning tasks - though you're still going to want to check periodically to be safe. Since there's no creosote buildup, roofing shingles will not become stained.

    Why use Coal - Economics
    Heating with Coal is an economical option - it is half to one third the cost of heating with oil and about 36% less than the direct cost of heating with wood.
    Coal making a comeback.

    Coals vary in quality, but on average, a ton of coal contains about as much potential heat as 146 gallons of heating oil or 20,000 cubic feet of natural gas, according to the Energy Information Administration. A ton of anthracite, a particularly high grade of coal, can cost as little as $120 near mines in Pennsylvania. The equivalent amount of heating oil would cost roughly $380, based on the most recent prices in the state ó and over $470 using prices from December 2007. An equivalent amount of natural gas would cost about $480 at current prices.
    Lead, follow, or shut the **** up.

  10. #10
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    I heat my home with a coal fired stove in my finished basement. The house is a 1400 sq.ft. ranch. During the winter months I remove the door to the basement and the natural draft allows the heat to circulate around the house. I get my coal from either Agway or a local feed store, a small locally owned family business. My stove is a fairly large hand stoker. During this time of year it is overkill and the house would be 85 degrees. However, in the dead of winter, the house never drops below 70 degrees. Once I fire the stove, I could use the same fire for the entire season if the weather permits. I get roughly 10-12 hours on a burn. I typically load the stove in the morning before work and again before I go to bed. Each load is approx. 30lbs. It is fairly dusty from the fly ash, but using caution during shake down, loading and ash clean out will keep that to a minimum.

    It did take some time to figure out the most efficient way to run the stove. I tried nut coal, pea coal, and a 50/50 combination of the two. I also had to experiment with the depth of the bed. Too shallow and it would burn hot and fast. Too deep and it would smother itself. I found that it takes much longer to produce heat from a cold start than wood, but once it's running.... it cranks. Coal is not something you burn to get quick heat, to "take the chill out of the house". Lots of good info for coal burners at www.nepacrossroads.com. Hope this helps.

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