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Thread: Coyote Hunting

  1. #61
    NES Member Broccoli Iglesias's Avatar
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    I have been looking at a FoxPro I had a Phantom and thought it sucked. Has anyone used night vision or just moonlight with our wonderful law of no artificial lights?
    night vision is not legal. it is artificial lighting. at least thats what the dudes that are in the wildlife management office in Hanson told me. (right next to the Hanson rod and gun club)
    All you need is a good scope and clear sky.

    the foxpro spitfire calls is pretty good, and the sounds are pretty realistic. i just got one, didnt have a chance to try to call in any coyotes, i will tomorrow night. But i did have some fun hiding it out in the trees and playing the coyote howl and raccoon fight, and watching my dogs react to it.

    does anyone hunt in Myles Standish? if so, how is it?

    im going to try some places out near NH this year, but i've never been to Myles Standish before.
    Last edited by Broccoli Iglesias; 10-01-2010 at 06:35 PM.

  2. #62
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    I live right near miles standish, did a little phesant last year and it wasnt bad. Ill be spending a bit of time out there this year for deer and coyote. but have no experience there just yet.

  3. #63
    NES Member Broccoli Iglesias's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by firestorm View Post
    I live right near miles standish, did a little phesant last year and it wasnt bad. Ill be spending a bit of time out there this year for deer and coyote. but have no experience there just yet.
    the reason why i am asking is because Myles Standish seems like a place where a lot of hunters go, and where you have a lot of hunters you are bound to have a few stupid ones that shoot at noise. and i dont want to get shot. lol

  4. #64
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    I have been a few places deer hunting that are like that (Quabin comes to mind). It makes you want to dress in Kevlar from head to toe lol. I stay away from them now that I have more experience and places to go.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Broccoli Iglesias View Post
    the reason why i am asking is because Myles Standish seems like a place where a lot of hunters go, and where you have a lot of hunters you are bound to have a few stupid ones that shoot at noise. and i dont want to get shot. lol

    Yeah, that I dont know. I havent been there during deer season, and the only time during phesant that I had an issue was a guy who couldnt see us because we were at the top of a small hill he was halfway up and out of his sightline when he fired over our heads.

  6. #66
    NES Member Madball13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by firestorm View Post
    Yeah, that I dont know. I havent been there during deer season, and the only time during phesant that I had an issue was a guy who couldnt see us because we were at the top of a small hill he was halfway up and out of his sightline when he fired over our heads.
    Tried out my Foxpro Firestorm on crows last Saturday and it worked the nuts. The foxbang feature was great and the remote and unit easily worked out to 125 yards with line of sight. Going to test it at 200 yards this weekend and hopefully bang some coyotes in Maine.
    Out of every one hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back."
    ó Heraclitus

  7. #67
    NES Member Broccoli Iglesias's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madball13 View Post
    Tried out my Foxpro Firestorm on crows last Saturday and it worked the nuts. The foxbang feature was great and the remote and unit easily worked out to 125 yards with line of sight. Going to test it at 200 yards this weekend and hopefully bang some coyotes in Maine.
    i still didnt get a chance to try my foxpro firestorm on animals, but i did try it on my neighbors last weekend. I set it up about 200 yards in the woods, and put on the coyote howl. The next morning he asked me if i heard the coyotes last night. lol

    the sounds a very realistic, and im impressed with how loud that little speaker gets, and if thats not enough, you can plug in bigger speakers.

    the only bad thing about the foxpro is that it is not water proof, but a trash bag solves the problem and doesnt affect the sound.

  8. #68
    NES Member Broccoli Iglesias's Avatar
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    well, i finally tried the foxpro spitfire.

    I drove my jeep to a field earlier today (we usually have fires thee), and sat on the roof. the coyotes are used to cars parking there, i usually leave my jeep there almost every night.

    In a little under an hour i could hear growling from the woods, i stopped the call to see if the coyote would come out to the field (i've seen them on the field during the day before), but he didnt. then a half hour later i played the call again, and 15min after that i heard growling again, but this time the growling started going in a semi circle. I lowered the volume and saw some eyes in the woods, But still wouldnt come out. After that i turned the call on one more time, and this time the growling got worse, and i could hear more coyotes far away howling, so maybe he was waiting for the pack.

    at this point, realizing that there was no moon (but a clear sky) and i couldnt see very well out of my scope (i wasnt planning on shooting them, just wanted to try out the call, but i needed some protection just in case), i turned on a flashlight to scare them away and went and got my call.

    they seem to like the Jack rabbit distress call, and the small hills around really amplify the sound.

    i tried using the coyote locator and Female coyote howling, but i didnt get any answers.

    i will go back out tomorrow night, but this time with a tree stand and will cover my scent and will set up right where they were growling at me.

  9. #69
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    I had sent the following message on September 30:

    Hello,

    I have reviewed the regulations described in the pdf files online, as well as had several discussions with friends, family, and fellow outdoorsmen regarding the following topics, but have not been able to reach a satisfactory answer. I hope you can provide me with a basic, clear answer to my inquiries.

    According to page 29 of the 2010 Massachusetts Fish and Wildlife Guide to hunting, fishing, and trapping,

    "Rifles chambered to take larger than .22 caliber long rifle rimfire ammunition and pistols and revolvers chambered to take ammunition larger than .38 caliber are prohibited between the hours of 1/2 hour after sunset and 1/2 hour before sunrise (night time)."

    I have a couple of questions about this regulation.

    First, is the .17 remington (or similar .17 caliber, small, fast options like the .17 fireball) legal to hunt coyotes at night? The projectile is smaller than that of a .22LR, but the center fire case is larger, packing in more powder. I do not see any wording in the regulation that specifically prohibits a center fire cartridge. The .17 remington travels at a very fast velocity and is accurate and effective for coyotes out to 150-200 yards. The .17 remington is a top choice of many veteran coyote hunters who chose this caliber for it's accuracy, range, and lethal effect on the coyotes with proper shot placement. It is MUCH better suited to quickly and more importantly, humanely dispatch coyotes than a .22LR could ever be.

    Second, is the .22WMR rimfire a legal alternative to .22LR? It is a slightly longer case which allows for more powder, producing higher velocities than that of the .22LR. Still, the .22WMR is not an ideal choice for humane kills on the coyotes, but it is seemingly a better alternative to the .22LR.

    The regulations also state that artificial lights are prohibited. Why is this? I would think being able to illuminate your target and what lies beyond with a flashlight would be safer, and make for better shots on game hunted at night.

    Regarding the Grey squirrel regulations on page 28, why are rifles and handguns prohibited in zones 10-14? A small caliber rifle like .22LR, .17HMR, or .22mag make perfect sense for small game like squirrel, and many of these rifles are employed in the western part of the state in zones 1-9.

    Thank you for your time and assistance,

    meth0d
    Today, I received the following response and thought I'd share with the class:

    Hi Chris,

    Anything chambered larger than a .22LR is prohibited by statute. Some .17 caliber rifles are legal, but others are not. If the chamber of the rifle is larger than that of a .22LR, then it is NOT legal to use. For example, the Hornaday Mach II is a .17 caliber rimfire rifle with the chamber the same size as a .22LR rimfire. The .17 claiber centerfire (.17 cal Remington centerfire or .17 cal Hornet) or the .17 cal HMR (which is rimfire) all have chambers that are larger than a .22LR and therefore are not legal. ANY rifle that has a chamber larger than a .22LR is illegal to use at night. During the daytime, there are no size restrictions for rifles.

    Artificial light is also prohibited by statute. Many coyote hunters use moon light, night vision (anything that does not project a beam or light), or snowy nights with a good moon to successfully hunt coyotes. Anything that is in statute would require an act of the legislature to change.

    The rifle restrictions for squirrel hunting are due to the higher human population in eastern MA.

    Laura

  10. #70
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    Thanks for sharing. That clears up any grey areas. I am glad to see you can use night vision. I don't see How it would be called artificial light because like they stated it doesn't project a "beam".

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