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  1. #1
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    Default proper case lubing

    Just getting into reloading and I've been checking some things out online about the steps to reloading for rifles.. One place i was at said to lube the case before the depriming/full length sizing step.. Then to clean the lube off so that the powder wouldn't stick to the case... Then to prime, charge and seat a round on the case.. I don't understand, I thought your case was to be lubed when doing any stage in the press.. I don't understand how the powder could stick since the outside is the only part lubed and the charge is going inside the case.. Am i right on this or am I wrong.. This guy was also not using carbine dies so the cases have to be lubed...
    Like I said I'm just getting into reload and would hate to be stuck with a stuck case. I'll Be reloading on a RCBS Rocker Chucker Supreme (single stage) with RCBS dies (not carbine dies) mostly for .223. Unsure about the primers, powder and bullet I'll be using just yet.. It'll be mostly for range shooting nothing special. Any suggests on anything would be apprieciated.

  2. #2
    NES Member Bob J's Avatar
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    I only lube the case when I am resizing.... I tumble the brass to ensure it is clean (won't scratch my dies) and then lube/size/deprime.... Afterward, I tumble the brass again to remove any lube..... I use Imperial Sizing Wax:

    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct...tnumber=519525

    I put some on the fingers of my left hand and lightly coat the neck/sides of the case when checking the brass (cracks, belling etc) and loading it for sizing/depriming....

  3. #3
    NES Member DukeInFlorida's Avatar
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    1) Even if you use CARBIDE (not carbine) dies, you still have to always lube necked rifle brass.
    2) I never wipe the lube off until I am done. It's my last step, so you should feel comfortable that the powder isn't going to stick, as you point out.
    3) Don't lube the neck or tapered shoulder, as that can cause a hydraulic dent to get formed when the lube wipes from the neck into the taper.
    4) Be sure to use case lube that is made for lubing cases, there are lots of choices in the market. Don't try to use WD40, or other non-reloading lubricants.
    NRA Certified Metallic Cartridge Reloading Instructor
    Author of a book on reloading

  4. #4
    Instructor wiskie762's Avatar
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    I use dillon case lube. Take a gallon size ziplock bag and a paper towel. Put the paper towel in the bag then put the cases in and spray close the bag and shake. when i was loading for my ar this was the fastest method for lubing.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by DukeInMaine View Post
    1)

    3) Don't lube the neck or tapered shoulder, as that can cause a hydraulic dent to get formed when the lube wipes from the neck into the taper.
    If you are getting dents you are using way to much lube. Lubrication on the case neck and case mouth are critical imo. It helps control neck tension, prevent case stretch from the expander ball and prolong brass life.

  6. #6
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    I use Hornady One Shot for both carbide and steel dies in .223. Imperial Sizing Wax also works well and I use it for my .308's. Believe it or not, Nancy Thompkins of long range fame uses liquid soap called Basic-H by Shaklee. She describes the problem with using too much as the same as any other lube (dents). Washing it off isn't a problem but you have to get them very dry. I tried liquid dish soap once and it does work well but I was not impressed with having to dry them. Even putting them in the sun on a 90 degree day took forever. I think Nancy blows them out with an air hose. To each his (or her) own!

  7. #7
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    I'm a little confused. Some of you are saying to lube the cases to deprime/size and to seat the bullet.. (of course you have to charge the case also
    but...) and some are saying only lube for depriming/sizing step..??? So whats the best/right way to reload .223 for a AR-15??? Lube or No Lube???
    Last edited by MechanicBenjamin; 06-10-2010 at 01:15 AM.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by MechanicBenjamin View Post
    I'm a little confused. Some of you are saying to lube the cases to deprime/size and to seat the bullet.. (of course you have to charge the case also
    but...) and some are saying only lube for depriming/sizing step..??? So whats the best/right way to reload .223 for a AR-15??? Lube or No Lube???
    The lube is only necessary for resizing. Some tumble the cases immediately after this step, and some reload the case and then tumble the loaded ammo. AR 223 cases must be full length resized which requires lube or the cases will stick in the die. I use the zip lock bag method earlier, but I spray the paper towel (one sheet) with lube (Dilon) prior to adding it to the bag. This method seems to add just the right amount of lube to the cases.

    I resize/decap and then tumble the cases to remove the lube (I just don't like the idea of tumbling loaded ammo). This often leaves tumbling media stuck in the primer flash hole in the case. Rather than remove the bits by hand I installed a decap only die in the #1 or resizing/decapping location in my 550. This die removes the media from the flash hole and the case is then ready to be reprimed and loaded.

  9. #9
    NES Member DukeInFlorida's Avatar
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    I don't see any where that mentions lubing FOR the purpose OF bullet seating. That wouldn't make any sense.

    What I said is that I wipe dry AFTER the final assembly is built, bullet seating being the last step. In other words, I just find it easier to handle the cases for wiping the lube off AFTER, when there's a bullet in place. Gives me a larger object to hold onto, for wiping.

    So, for .223/5.56 for an AR:
    1) Polish/Tumble cases
    2) Sort for problems (cracks, excessive dings and dents, etc), and remove problem cases
    3) Lube cases
    4) Full length resize/deprime
    5) Trim to length
    6) Decrimp primer crimp if it exists
    7) Re-prime
    8) Add powder
    9) Seat bullet
    10) Wipe lube off

    Quote Originally Posted by MechanicBenjamin View Post
    I'm a little confused. Some of you are saying to lube the cases to deprime/size and to seat the bullet.. (of course you have to charge the case also
    but...) and some are saying only lube for depriming/sizing step..??? So whats the best/right way to reload .223 for a AR-15??? Lube or No Lube???
    Last edited by DukeInFlorida; 06-10-2010 at 10:17 AM.
    NRA Certified Metallic Cartridge Reloading Instructor
    Author of a book on reloading

  10. #10
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    Ok now i understand whats goin on.. Like I said before I'm just getting into the reloading and as I check information out that has me a stumping i come to the experts. I really like this place!! Everyone really helps you out around here.. Thanks

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