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  1. #1
    NES Member pj150's Avatar
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    Default BJ's has quite the selection for safes


  2. #2
    NES Member smokey-seven's Avatar
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    Default

    Enjoy, but why would anyone purchase a safe that the lock would malfunction on an EMP?

    Manual please for me.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by smokey-seven View Post
    Enjoy, but why would anyone purchase a safe that the lock would malfunction on an EMP?

    Manual please for me.
    An EMP is the least of your worries. I remember reading an interview with a safe dealer who was quoted saying that sooner or later the electronic lock would malfunction "they all do." I just can't see using anything but a manual dial.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gammon View Post
    An EMP is the least of your worries. I remember reading an interview with a safe dealer who was quoted saying that sooner or later the electronic lock would malfunction "they all do." I just can't see using anything but a manual dial.
    Manual is the way to go, as long as you also have one or more rapid access safes for instant access (or carry full time).

    Opening a safe with a manual dial isn't a fast process.

    Lots of guys I know without a rapid access alternative, end up leaving the safe ajar or open because of the length of time to open it...not the best idea.

  5. #5

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    Opening a safe with a manual dial may take a while, but opening a safe with a failed electronic lock can take the rest of your life. I agree that one weapon should be stored in an emergency, quick access container.

  6. #6
    NES Member vellnueve's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gammon View Post
    Opening a safe with a manual dial may take a while, but opening a safe with a failed electronic lock can take the rest of your life. I agree that one weapon should be stored in an emergency, quick access container.
    Or, you can just rip off the lock mechanism and use the backup key.
    Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer and thus any interpretation or statements about the law that I might make should be taken with a grain of salt and mixed with your own legal research as well as advice from actual legal counsel. I cannot be held responsible if you find yourself somebody's "friend" in federal, state, or local prison should you act on my opinions on the law. My interpretations of the law will generally be on the conservative side.

  7. #7
    NES Member Stef's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smokey-seven View Post
    Enjoy, but why would anyone purchase a safe that the lock would malfunction on an EMP?
    Are EMP discharges a big problem where you live? Maybe you should consider moving.
    I love my country, but I fear my government.

  8. #8
    Moderator jasons's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smokey-seven View Post
    Enjoy, but why would anyone purchase a safe that the lock would malfunction on an EMP?

    Manual please for me.
    Just wrap it in tinfoil to block the pulse. You have some tinfoil left over, right?




    (Just a joke BTW. Manual for me too...)

  9. #9

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    Or, you can just rip off the lock mechanism and use the backup key.
    Curiously enough, backup keys to electronic locks in safes are generally something found only on low end safes. Higher end gun safes, and "real safes" (TL15 or better rating) that use electronic locks generally don't have a backup key. Installing a backup key mechanism in a safe adds complexity once the safe is at the level where you need security at least equal to that provided by a Group II or better combination lock. The most practical backup key mechanism would be an S&G lever tumbler safe lock which (a) isn't cheap, and (b) would require linkages in the safe to open when the bolt from the electronic lock, or from the key lock, will open the safe - which adds further expense to the cost of the safe.

    Backup keys are common on quick access single gun safes, and some lower end safes (for example, the Stack On ones with the combination dial), but are rare on the more secure units.
    Check out the USPSA Northeast Section at www.uspsa-ne.org, and the USPSA nationals site at www.uspsa.org

  10. #10
    Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stef View Post
    Are EMP discharges a big problem where you live? Maybe you should consider moving.
    ..

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