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copterdoctor
07-08-2011, 08:17 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZboxMsSz5Aw&feature=youtu.be

Broccoli Iglesias
07-08-2011, 08:25 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZboxMsSz5Aw&feature=youtu.be

that is awesome. Specially the fact that the parts still move.

Who has any MA non-compliant guns? want to make some replicas?

Underwhere
07-08-2011, 08:37 AM
Z Corp is in Burlington. One of my friends was an engineer for them before he went to grad school.

He could have taken a 3D printer home with him to work on projects in his spare time but he didn't.

They make 3D Scanners too. I made a custom stock for my 10/22 and he scanned it, then re-printed it.
I still have it sitting at home. The edges need work if I'm going to throw a 10/22 receiver in it.

Pretty cool stuff. He printed me a V6 engine block about 4 inches long one day.

Scanning it is not quite as simple as waving a wand over it and it's done. You'll need to do some work in a CAAD program to define certain things before printing.

These printers are used for rapid prototyping because the material produced isn't really designed for hard use.
And it takes quite a bit of time. My 10/22 stock took almost over 3 hours to print.

TYPEO1313
07-08-2011, 08:49 AM
They have been out for some time.

Broccoli Iglesias
07-08-2011, 09:14 AM
can they scan a person?

PixelPusher
07-08-2011, 09:16 AM
I've had many parts made using that technology.

The material they were demoing is not much use beyond show and tell. After a few days it
becomes brittle and will break fairly easily. Although, there are printers out there that can
print in ABS, glass-filled nylon as well as bronze and stainless steel. These are much more
durable and useful. They are, by no means, high precision parts. But they work.

I have used plastic and metal parts in product, but only prototype and short run items.

Neat process.


ETA:

By the way. The wrench they scanned is NOT the one they printed.

There is NO WAY they would be able to recreate the threads using the scanner alone.
Can we say, canned demo for the camera? I think we can boys and girls.

Broccoli Iglesias
07-08-2011, 09:21 AM
so, why didnt we scan the porsche before shooting it? have a porsche shoot every other month. lol

beaker
07-08-2011, 09:24 AM
Do a YouTube search on reprap. You can build one at home.

Sent from my Droid using Tapatalk

Prepper
07-08-2011, 09:32 AM
By the way. The wrench they scanned is NOT the one they printed.

There is NO WAY they would be able to recreate the threads using the scanner alone.
Can we say, canned demo for the camera? I think we can boys and girls.

I was suspicious of that. I don't see how a scanner would know where two parts come together that must not physically be combined but allowed to still move freely.

That's quite impressive, but I won't be truly impressed until the 3D printer can print another 3D printer. (In which case, I think that means we just invented the universal assembler, and the universe will soon be consumed by 3D printers replicating themselves as they use up all available material.)

Broccoli Iglesias
07-08-2011, 09:40 AM
I was suspicious of that. I don't see how a scanner would know where two parts come together that must not physically be combined but allowed to still move freely.

That's quite impressive, but I won't be truly impressed until the 3D printer can print another 3D printer. (In which case, I think that means we just invented the universal assembler, and the universe will soon be consumed by 3D printers replicating themselves as they use up all available material.)

OMG! 12-21-2012 now it all makes sense.

inerlogic
07-08-2011, 09:45 AM
That's quite impressive, but I won't be truly impressed until the 3D printer can print another 3D printer. (In which case, I think that means we just invented the universal assembler, and the universe will soon be consumed by 3D printers replicating themselves as they use up all available material.)

a reprap can already pretty much do that, i for one welcome our new 3d printer overlords....

smcnally
07-08-2011, 09:58 AM
That's quite impressive, but I won't be truly impressed until the 3D printer can print another 3D printer.

http://tapatalk.com/mu/4b435e3a-0d15-1c2f.jpg

chris_1001
07-08-2011, 10:07 AM
I have one at work for prototyping parts. The technology has been around for a while. The material is usually the weak point. You can make stuff that cant be machined and you can make "assemblies" in one run.

Pretty cool stuff, it would be fun to make a 1911 on it. But I suppose the people at work would frown on it... And I have a database of CAD 1911 parts available to me...

garandman
07-12-2011, 08:39 AM
Cool/

atilla
07-12-2011, 08:46 AM
they definitely simplified the process for the video, i haven't seen one of the machines in action that they used but if they really got it done in 90 minutes that is insane considering how fickle their older models are.

TWtommers
07-12-2011, 09:43 AM
One of my vendors uses a similar printer in their office. They use better plastics, usually an ABS to print so the parts are much more durable but they're still not perfect. They are great prototyping tools though. It saves you a bunch of money when you find a flaw in a part before spending a fortune on an injection molding tool!

I've been trying to convince them to make action figures of all the guys in the office but they're not going for it yet.

mclina
07-12-2011, 10:06 AM
I have taken a couple of groups of scouts to visit Objet Geometries in Burlington. They have some pretty cool stuff there. This flute is pretty impressive:

http://createdigitalmusic.com/2011/01/a-flute-made-on-a-3d-printer-and-the-possibilities-to-come/

They also have some really cool bio-medical stuff.

xtry51
07-12-2011, 12:05 PM
We have a Uprint here at work, much cheaper than the ZCorp machines. Only $15k.

garandman
07-12-2011, 03:08 PM
I have taken a couple of groups of scouts to visit Objet Geometries in Burlington. They have some pretty cool stuff there. This flute is pretty impressive:

http://createdigitalmusic.com/2011/01/a-flute-made-on-a-3d-printer-and-the-possibilities-to-come/

They also have some really cool bio-medical stuff.Objet is an Israeli company with US HQ in MA.

garandman
07-12-2011, 03:10 PM
We have a Uprint here at work, much cheaper than the ZCorp machines. Only $15k.Neat little machine. Terrific for motorcycle parts. Just sayin'....


I have taken a couple of groups of scouts to visit Objet Geometries in Burlington. They have some pretty cool stuff there. This flute is pretty impressive:

http://createdigitalmusic.com/2011/01/a-flute-made-on-a-3d-printer-and-the-possibilities-to-come/

They also have some really cool bio-medical stuff.Objet is an Israeli company with US HQ in MA.

Gibbs
07-13-2011, 06:05 AM
We are on our fourth machine; two Z-Corp's and two Dimension's.

For those wanting to go all Jay Leno (apparently, he purchased his first 3D printer so as to produce one off parts for his car collection (http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/jay-leno/technology/4320759)--and already auctioned it on eBay a year and a half ago (http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=229433271039)) the cost for ABS+ thermoplastic is upwards of $3.56 per cubic inch of model material...plus electricity, your labor, and occasional maintenance costs.

...That video that made the rounds even inspired the new xkcd doodle:

http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/3d_printer.png