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View Full Version : Venting for a oil burning furnace????



HKdrummer
05-31-2010, 06:15 PM
So as some of you may have seen in previous posts, I just purchased my first home. It currently has an almost brand new (3 year old) oil burning, forced hot water furnace in the basement. Now It is currently vented into the chimney which runs from the basement up past the roofline (obviously)

Now when I had my home inspection the inspector pointed out that the chimney needed re-pointing (which I knew of) and recommended that instead of having the chimney re-pointed I could take it down to the attic floor and just have an HVAC technician vent the furnace out the side of the house and save myself the hassle and cost of fixing the chimney. Honestly I like this Idea because my attic is a walk up and has potential to be a finished game room[smile], and with the chimney gone would open a lot of usable space.

Have any of you vented your furnace this way? And/or is this even a possibility? I tried googling it and this came up a lot in reference to Gas furnaces but nothing about oil.


EDIT: On a side note thanks ahead of time for any advice or help. I've tried joining other forums and NONE have been nearly as gracious and helpful to the topic of the forum let a lone side/ off topics like these. So again thanks ahead of time.

yanici
05-31-2010, 06:22 PM
I've never heard of such a venting for oil. Maybe there is a way with double walled pipe but I gotta say it would be a new one on me.

HKdrummer
05-31-2010, 06:24 PM
I've never heard of such a venting for oil. Maybe there is a way with double walled pipe but I gotta say it would be a new one on me.

Thats kind of what I thought but the inspectors advice was based that new furnaces have such low CO emissions that they don't require full chimney venting. I mean if I had to keep the chimney it wouldn't be the end of the world BUT if I could lose it that would be nice

Pilgrim
05-31-2010, 06:59 PM
I've seen it done that way. They use a double wall pipe into a fan mounted on the outside wall that draws the gasses out from the furnace and blows it outside.

Good/bad, I dunno. All I know is chimneys last a long time and don't require electricity.

atilla
05-31-2010, 07:01 PM
if you decide to do any work on your own and need a hand shoot me a PM and i'll see what (if any) assistance i could offer. i was gung-ho about my place but the bedroom and office are still unpainted, then again i also bought it heading into winter and it wasn't a good idea to leave the windows hanging open. [laugh]

01SVTvert
05-31-2010, 07:11 PM
Neighbor has a power vent instead of a chimney for his oil burner. Kicks on at the start of ignition and stay on after burn until the pipe (and fan) cools down. They do add some noise but if you are going to use the attic it would seem like a good idea. Only issue I could see is that like any electric motor you may have to replace it at some point.

Roadblock
05-31-2010, 07:37 PM
We've got a direct vented oil furnace (out of a PVC pipe); but its also a 97% efficient condensing unit with a condensate neutralizer (basically a filter with material in it to turn the ph 4 condensate to a ph 7. The exhaust temperature is about 90-95 degrees where it exits the house and only about 105 where it exits the furnace.

The problem with a direct vent/power vent of a non-condensing furnace (under 90% efficient or so) is that the exhaust is still very acidic (can damage things nearby) and if the mixture is off at all- it can start staining things nearby.

I've been told that a nice stainless liner is the way to go for an oil burning furnace that isn't condensing.

We did a lot of research when we found out our chimney had some cracked tiles (in the oil furnace side) and decided the liner was the best way to go. Of course before that happened the heat exchanger started having issues (35 year old furnace)...so we just got our new condensing unit.

DUSTYDOG
05-31-2010, 07:44 PM
So as some of you may have seen in previous posts, I just purchased my first home. It currently has an almost brand new (3 year old) oil burning, forced hot water furnace in the basement. Now It is currently vented into the chimney which runs from the basement up past the roofline (obviously)

Now when I had my home inspection the inspector pointed out that the chimney needed re-pointing (which I knew of) and recommended that instead of having the chimney re-pointed I could take it down to the attic floor and just have an HVAC technician vent the furnace out the side of the house and save myself the hassle and cost of fixing the chimney. Honestly I like this Idea because my attic is a walk up and has potential to be a finished game room[smile], and with the chimney gone would open a lot of usable space.

Have any of you vented your furnace this way? And/or is this even a possibility? I tried googling it and this came up a lot in reference to Gas furnaces but nothing about oil.


EDIT: On a side note thanks ahead of time for any advice or help. I've tried joining other forums and NONE have been nearly as gracious and helpful to the topic of the forum let a lone side/ off topics like these. So again thanks ahead of time.

pm sent

djs764
05-31-2010, 07:52 PM
You can use a power vent to vent an oil furnace. I've been using one for 13 years now and you will get a little black soot on the siding around it but nothing to bad. Just make sure you clean the furnace every year and you should be good.As far as noise it's not that bad unless you're in the room next to where it's venting even then I don't even notice it anymore. I'm pretty sure code is 3' from any opening,3' from any inside corner and 1' above grade.


http://www.fieldcontrols.com/venting.php

twogunwilly
05-31-2010, 08:10 PM
a power vent is convenient if you can't go up but it is another mechanical thing to malfunction on the coldest day/night, A chimney is always best. free advice from a P&H contractor.

Roadblock you sure you don't use gas?

HKdrummer
05-31-2010, 08:26 PM
a power vent is convenient if you can't go up but it is another mechanical thing to malfunction on the coldest day/night, A chimney is always best. free advice from a P&H contractor.

Roadblock you sure you don't use gas?

Ideally I will be using the second chimney in the house for a pellet stove and will only use the furnace for my hot water or as backup to the pellet stove. Who knows there are lots of options I have on the plate right now just need to get the appropriate info from my town.

Roadblock
05-31-2010, 08:48 PM
Roadblock you sure you don't use gas?

Positive, I've got a Kerr Paradigm. It uses a Riello BF3 burner, an ECM Motor, and a 3-stage heat exchanger (stainless steal), and can use several different condensate neutralizers (many are used in industrial applications too). It is absolutely fantastic, I could not be happier.

There are some other condensing oil furnaces on the market lately but most of them use proprietary burner designs and whatnot. We chose this furnace because most of the parts are readily available.

JoeyD
05-31-2010, 11:24 PM
There is nothing wrong with a power vent on an oil burner.

xtry51
06-01-2010, 12:21 AM
Ideally I will be using the second chimney in the house for a pellet stove and will only use the furnace for my hot water or as backup to the pellet stove. Who knows there are lots of options I have on the plate right now just need to get the appropriate info from my town.

Power vent it direct from basement and use chimney for wood/pellet stove. This is what I did in my house. I have oil and a wood boiler. Power vents are no problem on newer (<10 year old) furnaces and in 2 years since doing it there is no soot mark near my vent.

RobXD
06-01-2010, 01:02 AM
power venter+fan in the can(fresh air intake)..you need plumber,electrician and 1000$-1500$(labor+material)....good luck

twogunwilly
06-01-2010, 09:40 AM
Ideally I will be using the second chimney in the house for a pellet stove and will only use the furnace for my hot water or as backup to the pellet stove. Who knows there are lots of options I have on the plate right now just need to get the appropriate info from my town.

you don't need the chimney for a pellet stove,you can just go outside with a vent.just reline the chimney with a stainless sleeve and use that for the furnace or boiler

thanks for the info on your system roadblock, I never heard of that unit, I do learn something everyday! It's too bad Canada has to lead in oil fire efficiency. I've put in a lot of energy star rated boilers and furnaces but that takes the cake!

Realtor MA
06-01-2010, 09:44 AM
High efficiency burners can be direct vented with PVC. Many people go this route in order to remove the chimney and gain some living area. Repointing the chimney is cheaper. If the chimney needs to be relined that's another story.

Climbnsink
06-01-2010, 12:20 PM
I had a similar issue with an older oil boiler and woodstove sharing a chimney. I considered power venting, but ended up installing a metal chimney for the woodstove instead. One consideration was this was in VT and the vent would have been under the snow line for much of the winter. Plus most of the folks I talked to were anti-power vent of course that could have been a biased sample or folks that dealt with an early generation of power vents. Looks like folks here have had good luck with them. I'd price out a metal chimney liner first it might be cheaper.